Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
DEAL: For $25 - Add A Second Phone Number To Your Smartphone for life! Use promo code SLASHDOT25. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! ×

Submission + - Spark Energy Corporation Review - Consumer Alert New York State (anotepad.com)

carmecote08 writes: It has come to our attention that Spark Energy’s brand is being misrepresented, and consumers in New York state state are receiving calls from a third party (or parties) that are not authorized agents of our company. We take our company brand and reputation very seriously, and we are investigating this matter thoroughly. Any assistance consumers contacted by these agents can provide is greatly appreciated, including:

Name of the caller
Name on the Caller ID
Number on the Caller ID
Date and time of the call

We want to take this time to remind consumers that Spark Energy does not request the following information to process a customer enrollment over the phone in New York State, and we urge them not to provide any personal information of this sort: social security number; driver’s license number; home address. If you have been called by someone claiming to be with Spark Energy who requested this type of information, we urge you to contact one of the three (3) credit bureaus to review your credit report for any unusual activity and to request a fraud alert.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this has caused, and look forward to clarifying this matter as soon as possible so that we can continue to provide New York residents with choice when it comes to their electricity and natural gas needs.

If you have information regarding this matter, please contact us at 1.877.547.7275 or customercare@sparkenergy.com.

About Spark Energy Information

Spark Energy, L.P. is a Houston-based, independent, multi-state certified retail energy and natural gas supplier. With more than a decade of experience, the company works to consistently deliver low-cost energy rates, quality products and superior customer service to hundreds of thousands of satisfied customers across 16 states. Spark Energy is dedicated to positively impacting the communities it serves by building relationships, inspiring philanthropy and promoting good will both inside the company and throughout the community. For more information, visit www.sparkenergy.com.

Submission + - Over 14K Let's Encrypt SSL Certificates Issued to PayPal Phishing Sites (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: During the past year, Let's Encrypt has issued a total of 15,270 SSL certificates that contained the word "PayPal" in the domain name or the certificate identity. Of these, approximately 14,766 (96.7%) were issued for domains that hosted phishing sites. Other CAs have issued a combined number of 461 SSL certificates containing the term "PayPal" in the certificate information, which were later used for phishing attacks. This number is far smaller compared to misused Let's Encrypt certs.

Assuming that current trends continue, Let’s Encrypt will issue 20,000 additional “PayPal” certificates by the end of this year, bringing the total up to 35,000 over the past two years. To blame for this situation is Let's Encrypt, who said in a mission statement it doesn't intent to police the Internet. Browser makers are also to blame [1, 2], along with "security experts" who tell people HTTPS is "secure," when they should point out HTTPS means "encrypted communication channel," and not necessarily that the destination website is secure.

Submission + - Toronto school board ends all new US trips for students (bbc.com)

alqaly writes: Toronto school board ends all new US trips for students
Canada's largest school board is cancelling new school trips to the United States until further notice.

The Toronto District School Board announced the decision citing "uncertainty" with regards to who may be affected by US President Donald's Trump's latest travel restrictions.

Twenty-five already scheduled trips will go ahead as planned.

The school board joins the Girl Guides of Canada and a few other schools in temporarily halting travel to the US.

Under the new US travel ban, citizens from Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen would not be permitted to enter the US, unless they have already been issued valid visas, for a 90-day period.

However, the ban is suspended pending a number of court challenges.

In a statement released on Thursday, Director of Education John Malloy said that the district school board faced "a difficult choice".

"We strongly believe that our students should not be placed into these situations of potentially being turned away at the border," said Mr Malloy.

"For the trips that will be continuing, should students with the appropriate documentation be denied entry to the US for no legitimate reason, the entire trip will return to Toronto and will not proceed."

The board is among the largest in North America with some 246,000 students in 584 schools throughout Toronto.

Trump travel ban: Five questions about the revised executive order
Is it more difficult now for Canadians to enter the US?
The school board says that, should the US travel restrictions be fully implemented, pre-approved trips will also be cancelled.

Oregon, Washington, Minnesota, New York, Massachusetts, and Hawaii have all launched legal challenges against the Trump administration's executive order.

Some individuals from those countries would be exempt from the order, including legal permanent residents of the US and dual nationals travelling on a passport from a country not on the list.

Last week, Canada's Girl Guides announced they would not be travelling to the US until further notice.

Greater Essex County school board in south-western Ontario decided last month to cancel a handful of trips over concerns about equity.

The Ottawa-Carleton District school board recently sent a letter to parents asking whether their children would participate in upcoming trips across the border to determine whether plans should go ahead.

https://instagram-photos-2016....

Submission + - Terrifying anti-riot vehicle created to quash any urban disturbance (ibtimes.co.uk)

drunkdrone writes: A formidable remote-controlled anti-riot vehicle called the Bozena Riot has been designed to make light work of angry mobs with a giant expanding shield and packing an arsenal of crowd dispersal tools.

Built by Slovakian company Bozena, the high-tech security system keeps law enforcement units safe with its shock-absorbing barrier, which can be expanded out to 7.5 metres to protect 36 officers and features a rising platform to give riot police an elevated view of their surroundings and provide tactical advantage against aggressors.

The shield has ports for firing non-lethal projectiles and is equipped with tear gas guns to "guarantee control of crowds" when things get dicey. Mounted loudspeakers can be used either to issue instructions to officers or to appeal to crowds, and the vehicle can optionally be equipped with smoke grenade launchers and a radio jammer for blocking mobile communications.

Submission + - Why You Should Care About The Supreme Court Case On Toner Cartridges (consumerist.com)

rmdingler writes: A corporate squabble over printer toner cartridges doesn’t sound particularly glamorous, and the phrase “patent exhaustion” is probably already causing your eyes to glaze over. However, these otherwise boring topics are the crux of a Supreme Court case that will answer a question with far-reaching impact for all consumers: Can a company that sold you something use its patent on that product to control how you choose to use after you buy it?

Here’s the background: Lexmark makes printers. Printers need toner in order to print, and Lexmark also happens to sell toner.

Then there’s Impression Products, a third-party company makes and refills toner cartridges for use in printers, including Lexmark’s.

Submission + - Those IRS Scam Calls May Soon Disappear

Trailrunner7 writes: The FCC has moved one step closer to implementing a system that would prevent robocalls that spoof the caller ID of numbers that don’t initiate outbound calls, a move that could significantly reduce the volume of scam calls reaching businesses and consumers.

The commission on Thursday issued a notice that seems public comment on the concept of a Do Not Originate list, which would establish a set of phone numbers that never are used to initiate calls. This would help prevent fraudsters from spoofing the caller IDs of numbers owned by organizations such as the IRS, FBI, banks, and charities, a tactic that they use regularly to make their phone fraud schemes seem more plausible. The policy would allow carriers to block calls from numbers on the DNO list, something that they’re not allowed to do under FCC rules right now.

The proposal is an outgrowth of work done by the Robocall Strike Force, a group that the FCC and a number of carriers established last year in an effort to find answers to the robocall problem. The group has come up with a number of ideas, but the one that has the best potential to have an immediate effect is the DNO list. A trial of the DNO list concept last fall produced a 90 percent decrease in the number of IRS scam calls. Now, the commission is looking to allow carriers to implement this system on a permanent basis.

Comment Re:makes suing security researchers a feature ... (Score 1) 237

I think you've misunderstood: the law permits vendors to sue anyone, good guy or not, who releases a security hole. The law does not require they sue anyone: that's voluntary.

W3C is a voluntary organization: they can make it a membership requirement that members not sue people who publicize secuity breaches. A company that wants to use the law can resign, at the cost of doing so publicly.

It's called "moral suasion", and is a tradition way of protesting a law. One famous example is from the fight against slavery in the US, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_suasion

Comment Re:makes suing security researchers a feature ... (Score 1) 237

The proposal was that W3C should require "its members promise not to use DRM standardization as a way to get new legal rights to sue people for legitimate, legal activities like reporting security defects", close captioning and the like (EFF's wording).

It's the reporting of security holes that's at risk: the researcher can be legit or a crook, but if they publish, they've admitted a DMCA breach and can be sued.

Comment Canadian law arguably prohibits this (Score 2) 320

CASL, our anti-spam law, specifically requires informed consent before anyone installs anything on someone else's computer. There's a class action suitin the wings, waiting for "private right of action" to allow suits this summer.

The CRTC is the only organization that can lay charges, and you should see the rats scurrying around trying to keep the right to lay suits from coming into force (;-))

Slashdot Top Deals

VMS is like a nightmare about RXS-11M.

Working...