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Submission + - 10 Steps To Becoming A Horrible IT Boss 1

snydeq writes: Good-bye, programming peers; hello, power to abuse at your whim, writes Bob Lewis in a send-up of an all-too-familiar situation: The engineering colleague who transforms into a greasy political manipulator upon promotion into management. 'It’s legendary: A CIO promotes his best developer into a management role, losing an excellent programmer and gaining a bad manager. The art of management isn’t so much about assembling a dream team, helping others be successful, or solving technical problems. It’s about aligning everything you do in service of the business—the business of yourself.' What tales do you have of colleagues who broke bad all the way to the top?

Submission + - ATSC 3.0: Cord Cutter's Dream or Tiered Internet Nightmare? (audioholics.com)

Audiofan writes: The FCC has approved an innovation in digital broadcast television that could change everything you thought you knew about network TV. ATSC 3.0 is the first fully interactive, 2-way, IP-based broadcast standard. It all sounds so great! When content from every corporation that wanted to crush the Net Neutrality Act rides into your home on a mini-Internet approved and subsidized by the same government that wants to spy on you and store all your personal information for later use against you — what could possibly go wrong?

Submission + - 185,000+ Vulnerable Wi-Fi Cameras Just Waiting To Be Hijacked (helpnetsecurity.com)

dinscott writes: A generic wireless camera manufactured by a Chinese company and sold around the world under different names and brands can be easily hijacked and/or roped into a botnet. The flaw that allows this to happen is found in a custom version of GoAhead, a lightweight embedded web server that has been fitted into the devices.

The list of vulnerable devices includes 1250+ camera models from over 300 vendors, including D-Link, Foscam, Logitech, Netcam, and Polaroid.

Submission + - SPAM: Fix for Apple's New File Browser

JonnyWoodman writes: It seems that Apple no longer provides an intuitive file-browser on Macs — confusing many users as they try to organize or locate their files. Now some third party file browsers are becoming available.

Apple changed the default operation of their "Finder" file-browser so that it no longer shows directories. It has become more of searching tool than a browsing tool.

However, rather than find and install a third party tool, you can restore browsing capability by changing a questionably chosen "Finder" default setting.

See: How to Fix Apple's Latest File Browser

Submission + - SPAM: Neanderthals ate vegetables, gave themselves medicine

phantomfive writes: A DNA analysis of tarter (hardened plaque) on Neanderthal teeth shows that some of them were mainly vegetarian. It also shows that they self-medicated with natural occurring aspirin, and possibly even penicillin. According to the study they a,so shared food with, or even kissed, homo-sapiens. There is also evidence of cannibalism.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Remote Destruction? H*ll No! (zdnet.com)

es330td writes: Soon, you can buy gadgets that can self-destruct when stolen

From TFA:

The self-destruct mechanism consists of an expandable polymer, which crumples the device's chips within a few seconds. When the mechanism is remotely triggered, heater electrodes that draw power from the device's battery activates the polymer, which rapidly expands to seven-times its original size when heated to 80C (176F).

There's zero possibility hackers will figure this out, right?

Submission + - Man doxxes laptop thief by taking control remotely and pilfering her Facebook (ibtimes.co.uk) 1

drunkdrone writes: A Canadian man took matters into his own hands after his laptop was stolen when he logged into it remotely and posted the thief's misdeeds online. Stu Gale, from Cochrane, Alberta, had his computer swiped after leaving it in an unlocked car and days later received a notification informing him that someone had logged onto the device.

The 51-year-old computer security expert tried to access his computer by beginning a remote connection, which allows someone to connect to and take control of a device from another location. To begin with the thief kept closing the pop-up window, but she eventually left the room, unwisely while still logged into her Facebook account.

Submission + - NYC Spent $69M on Special Ed Software That Cost $75M in Labor Judgments (observer.com)

BradyDale writes: One in seven students in NYC schools are in special education, each of whom has lots of individualized service goals each year to help them achieve an appropriate education. That's tough to keep track of, so in 2008 NYC schools procured services to build software to help track it.
The poorly designed software has made matters worse. So far, it has earned $75M in labor arbitration settlements over time teacher's wasted wrestling with the system outside of school.
Now, the city's public advocate has sued to find out if students get the services the law entitles them to.

Submission + - Squirrel 'Threat' to Critical Infrastructure

randomErr writes: The real threat to global critical infrastructure is not enemy states or organisations but squirrels. Cris Thomas has been tracking power cuts caused by animals since 2013. His Cyber Squirrel 1 project was set up to counteract what he called the "ludicrousness of cyber-war claims by people at high levels in government and industry", he told the audience at the Shmoocon security conference in Washington. Squirrels topped the list with 879 "attacks", followed by birds with 434 attacks and then snakes at 83 attacks.

Submission + - SPAM: IETF Stunning Announcement: Emergency Transition to IPv7 Is Necessary!

Lauren Weinstein writes: In answer to a question regarding the timing of this proposed transition, Seville noted that the IETF planned to follow the GOP’s healthcare leadership style. “We feel that IPv4 and IPv6 should be immediately repealed, and then we can come up with the IPv7 replacement later.” When asked if this might be disruptive to the communications of Internet users around the world, Mr. Seville chuckled “You’re catching on.”
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Are Social Media's "Ads For Eyeballs" Valuations About To Be Eviscerated? (zerohedge.com)

alternative_right writes: There’s a peculiar tone emanating from the social media space. It’s a little hard to hear, but if you listen closely, it’s there none the less. That sound is the sudden gasp of realization that the most dominating reasoning and defense that encompassed the entire social media space may in fact being laid-to-waste right before their screens. That horror?

The eyeballs for ads model doesn’t work.

Submission + - What happened to UI? Who are the people who approve modern UI?

Artem Tashkinov writes: Here are the staples of the modern user interface (in varying degree apply to modern web/and most operating systems like Windows 10, iOS and even Android):
  • Too much white space, huge margins, too little information
  • Text is indistinguishable from controls
  • Text in CAPS
  • Certain controls cannot be easily understood (like on/off states for check boxes or elements like tabs)
  • Everything presented in shades of gray or using a severely and artificially limited palette
  • Often awful fonts suitable only for HiDPI devices (Windows 10 modern apps are a prime example)
  • Cannot be controlled by keyboard
  • Very little customizability if any

How would Slashdotters explain the proliferation and existance of such unusable user interfaces and design choices?

Submission + - It's not you, Slashdot, it's me. 5

BuckB writes: When I was a young man, I read Slashdot in order to amaze my friends with useful facts. It was even my homepage for awhile. Sure, there was time when I cheated and went to cnet or wired. With Slashdot, I could count on high quality debate on controversial topics, even though I knew in my heart that most of the readers were Apple fans, while I am a closeted Microsofterian. Now the stories are mainly non-tech — no, that's the real reason — the stories are now mainly fake or click-bait or alarmist, and the discussions are completely uninformed, insulting, to the point of being indistinguishable from an MSNBC forum.

I'll still remember you fondly. And I'll check back now and then. You'll do fine without me, find more people who enjoy insulting contributions and upvoting rumors and gossip. But maybe, just maybe, you'll think back to when you were a leader and attracted the kinds of people like me.

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