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Submission + - Canadian fined for not providing boarder agents smartphone password

da_foz writes: A Canadian was reentering Canada when he was arrested and charged with hindering or obstructing border officials. At the time traces of cocaine where found on his bags and was carrying $5,000 in cash. He provided his smartphone to border agents as requested, however refused to provide the password.

It is unclear if he provided the password while agreeing to the fine.

Submission + - Largest US Insurance Company to Leave Obamacare (cnn.com)

FlyHelicopters writes: "UnitedHealthcare, the biggest health insurer in the United States, said Tuesday that it plans to exit most of the Affordable Care Act state exchanges where it currently operates by 2017.

And according to estimates from the Kaiser Family Foundation, it could mean higher insurance premiums in several states — most notably Alabama, Arizona, Iowa, Nebraska and North Carolina.

UnitedHealth rivals Aetna (AET) and Humana (HUM) are merging. So are Cigna (CI) and Anthem (ANTM). That means that the industry could be about to go from five big players to only three."

Submission + - Ad technology company claims ad blockers are "breaking the Internet" (telegraph.co.uk)

whoever57 writes: London, UK based ad technology company Oriel has published a claim that ad blockers break web applications in ways other than merely not displaying ads. They show examples such as airline sites that will not allow check-in because of the effects of an ad blocker. The original report is here. The CEO of Oriel is quoted saying that he discovered this accidentally when attempting to check into a flight, which raises the question: why would the CEO of an ad technology company use an ad blocker?

Submission + - Slithering Serpentine Robot Snakes Its Way to Seabed Inspections (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: It looks like something you'd want to steer clear of in a video game, and most likely real life as well, but this menacing mechanical snake isn't out to hurt anybody. Developed to cut the costs of maintaining underwater equipment, the Eelume robot is designed to be unleashed permanently on seabeds where it will glide through tight spaces tending to gear that is difficult and expensive to reach for us humans.

Submission + - Facebook Struggles to Stop Decline in 'Original' Sharing (fortune.com)

AmiMoJo writes: Less than a year ago, leaders at Facebook convened to address a serious problem: people using the social network were posting fewer things about their personal lives for their friends to see, according to confidential company data about content sharing. Thus began an effort to deal with this long-term threat to Facebook’s primary moneymaker, the News Feed. Facebook set up a team in London to help develop a strategy to stop the double-digit decline in "original" sharing that happens on Facebook.

Comment Growing up (Score 0) 38

This really just feels like kids growing up.
They're having an 'oh crap' moment when they realize they need to own up to the mess they've made, deal with it, and get on with life. I'd say the difference in these cases if you try and compare with 20+ years ago is that in these cases the trouble they're able to cause is magnified by the wide reach and inter-connectivity of our current software systems.

Do they need to be held accountable for what they've done? Yes!
Should they be given the opportunity to atone by trying to make things better? Likely.

Submission + - Google Will Start Ranking 'Mobile-Friendly' Sites Even Higher In May

An anonymous reader writes: Google today announced it is rolling out an update to mobile search results in May that “increases the effect” of its mobile-friendly ranking signal. The goal is to “help our users find even more pages that are relevant and mobile-friendly,” though the company didn’t share exactly how much of an impact it expects the change to have.

Submission + - Genetically Modified Mosquitoes To Be Tested in Florida (thelatestnews.com)

cokomoko writes: As a consequence of the Zika virus threat, a British-based biotechnology company is to begin tests on a genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquito, designed to try to stop transmission of the disease. Although trials have been carried out on a small scale, a large trial will be conducted in the U.S. (in Florida at an isolated peninsula north of Key West). The need for a trial is important, because it is unknown if the full-blown plan will work unless a scaled-up pilot is run.

Submission + - Most Vehicles Will Allow OTA Software Updates Within Six Years (computerworld.com)

Lucas123 writes: By 2022, using a thumb drive or taking your vehicle to the location you bought it for a software update will seem as strange as it would be for a smartphone or laptop today. By 2022, there will be 203 million vehicles on the road that can receive software over-the-air (SOTA) upgrades; among those vehicles, at least 22 million will also be able to get firmware upgrades, according to a new report by ABI Research. Today, there are about 253 million cars and trucks on the road, according to IHS Automotive. The main reasons automakers are moving quickly to enable OTA upgrades: recall costs, autonomous driving and security risks based on software complexities, according to Susan Beardslee, a senior analyst at ABI Research. "It is a welcome transformation, as OTA is the only way to accomplish secure management of all of a connected car's software in a seamless, comprehensive, and fully integrated manner," Beardslee said.

Comment LifeStraw (Score 2) 89

How is this any different from the LifeStraw?

Having the filter in a piece of paper seems less practical and more prone to error i.e. water spilling over the side. You also require multiple containers. A dirty container from which to pour the water, and a clean container for storage.

Note: I am in no way affiliated with LifeStraw and have never used the product.


Submission + - FTC Fines RockYou $250,000 For Storing User Data In Plain Text

An anonymous reader writes: Do you remember the RockYou fiasco? You probably don’t as it happened in late 2009. Let me refresh your memory: social game developer RockYou suffered a serious SQL injection flaw on its flagship website. Worse, the company was storing user details in plain text. As a result, tens of millions of login details, including those belonging to minors, were stolen and published online. Now, RockYou has finally settled with the Federal Trade Commission.

Submission + - RealNetworks crushes Dutch webmaster for hyperlink (pcadvisor.co.uk)

suraj.sun writes: RealNetworks has sued the owner of a website in The Netherlands for displaying a hyperlink to a competing freeware package. As the company seeks compensation for its claimed losses, the 26-year-old man is borrowing money from family to survive.

The case started in 2010 when RealNetworks demanded that the computers belonging to Hilbrand Edskes and his family be confiscated. A Dutch judge granted this in an ex-parte ruling, based on an alleged violation of copyright law and trademark law. The company claims that Edskes was hosting the infringing software. The move to secretly obtain the order was meant to ensure that evidence wasn’t deleted.

Edskes has a website, Codecpack.nl, that links to a wide variety of freeware programs. One of these is "Real Alternative", a competitor of the mediaplayer RealPlayer from RealNetworks.

However, Edskes wasn’t hosting the software, but just redirected to other sites for the actual download. The complaint turned out to be based on a hyperlink to the software. To date there have been two court sessions, and in December Edskes will have to testify under oath.

PC Advisor: http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/tech-industry/3299285/realnetworks-crushes-dutch-webmaster-for-hyperlink/

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