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Comment Re:Use computers instead? (Score 1) 247

I don't know who you hang out with, but the D&D players I know tend to be pretty superstitious about their die. And fairness doesn't really enter into it: if you roll any dice for no reason and get a high value, you are wasting those high values. If a dice is rolling badly for you, you "retire" it for the night.

it makes absolutely no sense, but it does. :-)

DRM

Details of Initial "Disc to Digital" Program Emerge 201

MojoKid writes with an excerpt from an article at Hot Hardware: "Walmart's burgeoning partnership with the Ultraviolet DRM system backed by major Hollywood studios and their plans to 'assist' customers in registering DVDs with the Ultraviolet system, made headlines not long ago. Walmart has also since announced additional details to the program and it's a clever attempt to drive more users to Vudu, Walmart's subsidiary movie streaming service. Here's how the service works. 'Starting April 16th, 2012 in more than 3,500 stores, Walmart customers will be able to bring their DVD and Blu-ray collections to Walmart and receive digital access to their favorite titles from the partnering studios. An equal conversion for standard DVDs and Blu-ray discs will be $2. Standard DVDs can be upgraded to High-Def (HD) for $5.' Anyone who doesn't have a Vudu account will have one created for them as part of this process. That's part of the genius to the plan. If customers embrace the offer, Walmart signs up hundreds of thousands, possibly millions of people for Vudu. Even better, from Walmart's perspective, is that first-time users who pony up $2 for a digital version of their DVDs are effectively paying to create Vudu accounts."

Submission + - Flowchart Guides Readers Through 100 Best SF Books

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "T. N. Tobias writes that over the summer, over 60,000 people voted at NPR to select the top 100 science fiction and fantasy books of all time. The result? A list of 100 books with a wide range of styles, little context, and absolutely no pithy commentary to help readers actually choose something to read from it. Now SF Signal has come to the rescue with a 3800 x 2300 flowchart with over 325 decision points to help you find the perfect SF or Fantasy book to meet your tastes. Don't like to scroll? There's an interactive version that let's you answer a series of questions to find the perfect SF book."
Security

Building a Better 'Anonymous?' 119

An anonymous reader writes "A hacktivism panel at the DefCon hacker convention was conspicuously missing its star member Aaron Barr, who dropped out under legal pressure from his former company HBGary Federal, debated how Anonymous could channel its efforts for the greater good. Members of Anon attending the discussion chimed in, too."

Comment Maybe, mabe not... (Score 3, Insightful) 97

I don't know how seriously the scientist took this research.

But I do remember that Richard Feynman wrote a paper on the wobbling movement of a spinning plate. He did this because he was depressed and had scientific writer's block. And nobody would deny the importance of his later work.

Science is science. If what they find is correct in the scientific sense, it really doesn't bother me too much.

I'd be worried if scientists started really competing for the Ig Nobel prizes. But I doubt that they ever will :-).

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