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Comment f!rstPo$t (Score 0) 140

Half of what TFA is suggesting is, essentially, making passwords case-insensitive. Which as far as I'm concerned is a good thing, I despise case-sensitivity in all its forms in computing, to a human filename is the same as Filename and FILENAME. It's only binary technical smart-asserry that distinguishes them. (I'm a C# coder and I have no problem with the IDE auto-correcting and formatting the cases on my variables so that code is readible and consistent, thus avoiding compile errors)

Comment Re:Generators (Score 2) 637

Why is writing it down so bad? Specifically if these are your personal logins and they're in a little black book in a drawer in your house. Aren't they MORE secure, because no amount of remote hacking can read ink off a piece of paper? And if $thief has broken into your house, they're not going to go looking for said little black book - they're going to grab a laptop and a DSLR and get out.

Comment Re:Blocks? (Score 2) 112

Plus it runs like a dog on anything but a monster PC. While the console edition (being a native port) runs fine on my Xbox 360. When MS acquired it I was hoping for a native DirectX C++ port (with mod compatibility, magically somehow), but all they've managed is porting pocket edition to Windows 10 App Store. Meh

Comment Why do modern monitors need refresh rates? (Score 2) 96

CRT displays relied on phosphorous glowing for a short period after being blasted by electrons. You had to keep redrawing the screen to refresh the pixels. But modern monitors are based on LED technology - they don't need refreshing - you just turn them on and off. So why have refresh rates at all? Why doesn't the device simply send frames to the monitor as and when they are ready and the monitor just display what it's told. If I don't send a new frame for an hour the monitor should just sit there for an hour showing the same picture without any refreshing or switching or scanning or any of that.

Comment Re:Little people, I know... (Score 1) 49

While you are technically correct it's not actually the law in the UK . The PRS are the people who will come round and check (not the BPI) and they're not so much a licensing authority as a club that most of the artists, bands, labels etc are members of. It's basically a protection racket dressed up in shiney clothes. If you limited your musical output to non-PRS-registered artists then TECHNICALLY you wouldn't need a PRS license. Technically is in capital letters, because you are little people and they are loaded.

One fun fact is that if you are a PRS artist and you perform your own work live in a PRS registered venue then you get paid from the PRS's coffers because on that date $venue broadcast your music. Even if the venue ALSO pay you in person for your performance.

So if you want to get rich quick, make some music, register it with the PRS then sit in a PRS registered pub all day playing your own music to the lonely bloke and dog.

Comment Re:deja vu (Score 1) 394

We had graphics calculators waaay back in the 90s and we were allowed to use them (even encouraged for certain hardcore physics and maths exams) - on the way in they'd check the screen of your calculator to make sure the programmable memory was empty.

So I wrote a program that rendered a fake home screen with a fake zero-bytes-used status.

Comment Re:Front end? (Score 2) 92

Wait, what? You're saying that if I went to http://example.com/x/y/z Directly I'd get the exact same HTML rendered out as if I'd gone to http://example.com/ and clicked a link to /x/y/z ?

So basically, after forcing all this ajax on everyone for years you're finally getting back to Web 1.0 with proper links that actually link to stuff instead of linking to a pile of javascript

Comment it's an antitrust workaround (Score 1) 105

...to head off those court cases where various people and countries suspect that Google is giving its own products "undue prominence" in search results - by putting their own products in a separate column to the right (and perhaps then dialing down alleged prominence algorithm) they're now no longer in violation of anything

Comment Re:Let me get this straight... (Score -1) 127

Jesus, this again. No. You are wrong. Unless I lock my daughter in her room for her entire life does that mean someone has the right to rape her? I mean, technically, nothing would be being taken from her.

This webcam search is no different. Just because something is present in the universe and not physically hidden, locked, encrypted doesn't mean anyone can (legally or morally) dick about with it

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