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Comment Re:Reckless endangerment (Score 1) 198

It's not messed up. Well, not always. When you talk about intent, you're confusing conviction and sentencing.

Consider drink driving. If you get pulled over and blow over the limit, it's not exactly crime of the century. If you're drunk and you run over a pedestrian, it's a far more serious matter. Having said that, there are plenty of examples of habitual drunk drivers receiving custodial sentences, while a first time offender who runs someone over escapes jail.

Sentencing has to consider culpability, the prospect of rehabilitation, the rights of the victims, the need to protect society, and a range of other factors. It's not uncommon for an attempted murder to attract a more severe punishment than an actual murder.

The Courts

Techdirt Asks Judge To Dismiss Another Lawsuit By That Guy Who Didn't Invent Email (arstechnica.com) 80

Three months ago Shiva Ayyadurai won a $750,000 settlement from Gawker (after they'd already gone bankrupt). He'd argued Gawker defamed him by mocking Ayyadurai's claim he'd invented email, and now he's also suing Techdirt founder Michael Masnick -- who is not bankrupt, and is fighting back. Long-time Slashdot reader walterbyrd quotes Ars Technica: In his motion, Masnick claims that Ayyadurai "is seeking to use the muzzle of a defamation action to silence those who question his claim to historical fame." He continues, "The 14 articles and 84 allegedly defamatory statements catalogued in the complaint all say essentially the same thing: that Defendants believe that because the critical elements of electronic mail were developed long before Ayyadurai's 1978 computer program, his claim to be the 'inventor of e-mail' is false"...

The motion skims the history of e-mail and points out that the well-known fields of e-mail messages, like "to," "from," "cc," "subject," "message," and "bcc," were used in ARPANET e-mail messages for years before Ayyadurai made his "EMAIL" program. Ayyadurai focuses on statements calling him a "fake," a "liar," or a "fraud" putting forth "bogus" claims. Masnick counters that such phrases are "rhetorical hyperbole" meant to express opinions and reminds the court that "[t]he law provides no redress for harsh name-calling."

The motion calls the lawsuit "a misbegotten effort to stifle historical debate, silence criticism, and chill others from continuing to question Ayyadurai's grandiose claims." Ray Tomlinson has been dead for less than a year, but in this fascinating 1998 article recalled testing the early email protocols in 1971, remembering that "Most likely the first message was QWERTYIOP."

Comment Re:This Announcement Hot on Heels of Bilderbergers (Score 2) 759

I didn't forget it, this calculation is based on instantaneous or average power, so EROI of the panels isn't relevant . . . nevertheless . . .

Nonsense

It turns out the EROI break even point for poly- and monocrystalline panels is 4-7 years over a lifespan of 20 - 30 years and for lower cost thin-film panels it's 2-4 years over a lifespan of 10-15, assuming installation outside the arctic / antarctic circle.

Comment Re:This Announcement Hot on Heels of Bilderbergers (Score 5, Informative) 759

Nonsense

United States area = 9 trillion square meters (approximate)
United states average insolation over 24hrs = 100w (pessimistic)
United States average energy draw all forms of energy = 3.4 trillion watts
Photovoltaic conversion factor = 15% (pessimitistic)

area * insolation * conversion factor = 135 trillion watts average over 24hrs

135 trillion watts > 3.4 trillion watts, even given these wildy pessimistic assumptions.

of course covering the whole of the USA with solar panels is ridiculous, then you have storage to deal with, but yeah, your sums are out by several orders of magnitude.

Google

Worst Companies At Protecting User Privacy: Skype, Verizon, Yahoo 113

First time accepted submitter SmartAboutThings writes "Apple and Microsoft are one of the worst companies at protecting our privacy, according to EFF's privacy report. Dropbox, Twitter and Sonic have some of the best scores." "Sonic" is California ISP Sonic.net, which tops the field with the EFF's only 4-star rating. Of ISPs with national presence, ATT and Comcast come in with a single star apiece, and Verizon gets a goose egg.

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