Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:I wonder... (Score 1) 199

Tivo is in a mad rush to somehow become a distant second place with no direct competitor.

I got DirectTV over a decade ago to feed a DirecTivo. On not being able to replace them as they wore out, one tuner at at time, I bought a newer tiro (Romio[?]) and switched to cable. (When asked why I was cancelling, I told him point blank, "Your DVRs suck." They are at least an entire generation behind in what they offer).

I quickly became underwhelmed by the new Tivo.

Where once it was easy to set a wishlist for all Series Premiers, now you have to search by that for text, which until a few weeks ago, had a staggering failure rate (picked up a couple a season).

With the older Tivos, you could tap the record button to record anything upcoming in the listing, and tap twice to get a season pass. Now, to record a single program is a couple of clicks, and a season pass several.

I'll definitely be looking for other options when this one wears out.


Comment Re:I thought this was obvious? (Score 1) 151

That 3% was all over the lace when I went into their store to activate phones a couple of weeks ago.

I want today that I also initialed it but it may just be that I read things before signing.

And it's not even automatic throttling at that point, but rather lower priority on the available bandwidth: if there's enough bandwidth you still get LTE.

Im also looked at MetroPCs, which was quite clear that their data was lower priority on the network than Tmobile accounts.


Comment Re:Macs come with plenty of languages (Score 1) 370

>Still waiting for a viable successor of Hypercard ...
>(and please don't post links to that company that is
>changing its name every 2 years and claims it
>RealCoder or LifeCoder or however it is called now is
>a Hypercard successor, it is not, it is rubbish)

I assume that you're misrefsrring to the program that came out as MetaCard on the NeXT, was then known as Runtime Revolution, and is now called Livecode.

It's IDE is sometimes misbehaved, but calling it "rubbish" is simply ignorant.

It is indeed far more complicated (and capable) than HyperCard, but is backwards compatible.

It supports a few SuperCard-isms, as well.

There are both open source (well, GPL 3) and commercial versions.

It is not, however, the "just dive in" that HyperCard was, although there is periodic talk about a stripped-down version for that.

I'm using it because It can compile for Mac/Windows/Linux with *very* minimal blocks (I have one on startup to deal with the different basic folders, a couple of lines for the different count in the top line of useable space, and a block to allow ~ on windows).

No, it won't be my choice for the long term, but being able to write once, and then to use that same code base for iOS and Android helper apps, is what seals it. Also, the ability to simply add fields hypercard-style is critical to my generation of new forms.

hawk, who writes a commercial product in it

Comment Re:Me too :wq (Score 1) 130

They can also send you off to medical care . . .

After a few long days editing on a full sized CKIE (control key in exile) keyboard, I found myself at the campus quack. Muscle strain in my pinkie, it turned out, from rotating much of my (large) hand and reaching that control key in the far corner . . .

By some strange coincidence, the janitors must have drooped my keyboard that day, as a little piece magically appeared next to it that sure looked like a physical toggle for the capslock key (surely *I* would never tamper with university equipment), and I was finally able to remap it to put the control key back where God Meant it to be . . .


Comment Re:Setting content restrictions in iOS (Score 1) 181

Strawberry? I don't even want to know . . .

Years ago. even pre-google iirc, I was putting graphs into an article with LaTeX.

It wasn't wrapping the text around the way I was used to in Word 5.1, so I went looking (probably with ALtaVista) for an extension.

I searched for "LaTeX wrap figure"

Oh, dear . . .


Comment Re:The end justifies the means (Score 0) 306

It's probably not that meaningful, anyway. Somewhere around 20-40% of the info in these documents will turn out to be wrong or misleading in some critical way. Mostly, it'll just be a case of "name files", with info about different people with the same (or similar) names entered in the wrong place. People will learn pretty quickly to deny anything they don't like. Of course, others will believe whatever they want about you, especially if it was in some "secret" document. But they too will learn that the info about them is also full of errors. More importantly, your friends and relatives will learn the same thing.

I've yet to see any official document about me (including medical records) that didn't have some bizarre thing with unknown origin. The people who keep the records just respond with a grin and a comment starting with "Yeah ....".

Actually, my favorite example, which my wife loves telling other people, is one of those "not even wrong" things that a nurse wrote down after a routine exam, saying that I was 5'13" tall and weighted 135 pounds. I am in fact about six feet one inch, but 135 pounds would make me one of the scrawniest six-footers on the planet. She'd used one of those old-fashioned scales with sliding weights, and had forgotten that she'd slid over a third 50-pound weight. But I've since then seen several personal histories that include that 135-pound weight back then. Once such things get into the database, they're almost impossible to correct. This is especially true of medical records. This can be really annoying to those that've had a "false positive" diagnosis somewhere along the line. But such things are pretty good at teaching you how much you can trust the "official" data about other people.

(I sometimes wonder if official records in other "advanced" countries are as screwed up as they are here in the US. I'd guess that they probably are.)


people do have their names :)

Not really; according to the US Census Bureau, there are about 1800 Americans with my (first+last) name. And probably a whole bunch of them have the same middle name, which is also one of the top 10 men's names in the US. My parents didn't have much imagination when it came to baby names.

OTOH, my wife continues to use her birth name for most purposes (which is fine by me). She likes the fact that, as far as she can determine, she's the only living human with that name. (And it's not even some unpronounceable "foreign" sounding name. She also likes to point out to people that her name is a syntactically correct English sentence. She has even found archived newspaper images that have her name at the top of a story. ;-)

But anyway, most of us don't "have" our names in any meaningful sense. We're just one of many who are using the name for a few decades, until we drop out of the crowd that are using it.

In college, I had a friend who was a member of the Bill Smith Club, whose only membership criterion is that you be named (or married to someone named) Bill Smith (or William Smythe or Wilhelm Schmidt or anything else that maps onto the name).

Comment Re:doh! (Score 2, Informative) 528

Obama didn't release his birth certificate for one very good reason, he is very clever and Trump is very stupid.

The fact is that the Republicans will always invent some crazy idiotic 'scandal' that they obsess about and endlessly throw up smoke. The birther conspiracy was mind numbingly ridiculous. It would require someone to go back in time to plant the birth notice in the papers. Or for some group of conspirators to go to an enormous amount of trouble in order to make a particular black kid president.

So rather than release the birth certificate and let the Republicans invent a new scandal, Obama held onto it and let them obsess about a scandal nobody else thought made the slightest sense, knowing that he could knock their house of cards down any time he chose. Which of course he did a week before the Bin Laden raid which was guaranteed to end the story.

George W. Bush opened torture chambers across the world and collected photographs for a sick sexual thrill. Yet nobody ever talks about that. None of the people complaining about Hilary ever complained about GWB refusing to comply with Congressional investigation or the deletion of 5 million emails.

So here is what is going to happen. Trump is going to go down to the biggest defeat since Carter and he is going to drag the rest of his party down with him. And afterwards there is going to be a new civil rights act that prohibits Republican voter suppression tactics and the gerrymandering that give them a 5% advantage in elections. And by the time it is all done the Republican party will have two choices, either boot the racist conspiracy theorists and Trumpists out or face two decades in the wilderness.

Comment Re: interstellar mission (Score 1) 347

I doubt you millennials will get us to Mars let alone out of the solar system. Science is hard and you are soft.

Actually, the same could be said about every generation/cohort. Most of the population are usually the anti-thinking sort who contribute nothing much to our knowledge. The advances have always come from a tiny minority who are typically not much respected by their cohorts. There's a tiny minority of "millennials" who are involved in making the advances that most of us won't live to appreciate. They're not hard to find if you hang out with the right crowds, but most people (including the /. crowd) would never bother with that.

Comment Re: Question (Score 2) 519

Let's face it, there weren't all that many heroines in WWI, or even WWII for that matter. Yes, there were the WACS, but women were kept away form combat.

None the less, many were heroic on the home front, and married the returning doughboys, some of whom were addicted to morphine. Many returning soldiers were indeed addicted to their heroines, and pampered them the rest of their joint lives.

Some of these doughboys were addicted to various forms of opium pain killers taken from their injury, including heroin . . . :)


Comment Re:Here's an idea (Score 1) 118

I've never blocked anything just for being an ad.

I do block anything that blinks or moves, including those carousals on news sites, and those bouncy-floating sidebars.

The consequence is that I see so few ads that I' surprised when one happens.

On the rare occasion I need a website on my phone, I use ghostly. I'm just plain not a product, and do not want to be tracked.


Slashdot Top Deals

A complex system that works is invariably found to have evolved from a simple system that works.