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Comment Re:It's not just reality that's biased... (Score 1) 385

The same people who say "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it" tend not to get as outraged about issues of protest involving free speech.

There were plenty of left leaning folks who disapproved, perhaps the most famous being Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: "It's dumb and disrespectful."

But the idea that you should be allowed to criticize the government or society is something leftists generally agree on.

Hmmmm, that seems to contradict the idea that "Leftists are against free speech."

Weird

Comment Re:It's not just reality that's biased... (Score 4, Interesting) 385

BTW... Apparently Slashdot also has a left-leaning bias. Wont' let me say "Nig.ers" with two 'g's.
Remember that as you read all the other posts here. This is a left-leaning site.

So you're saying since Slashdot doesn't let you use a racial slur, it's left-leaning? So you're saying right-leaning users want to use racial slurs but are thwarted by this left-leaning site?

That's what I thought.

Comment Re:The Actual Quote (Score 1) 805

I see what you mean. I enjoy nuance as much as the next guy, maybe even more so, but differentiating between bigot and racist may be too fine in the current discussion. They have the same behavioral effect to minorities.

But I guess the test is if he makes positive nationalistic statements about black Americans. My gut tells me that won't happen.

Comment Re:I completely agree (Score 1) 805

Exactly. An additional layer of nuance is who gets to decide. Should "we" (the host country) decide that college grads would build a better society back at their home? I think we're not smart enough to decide that. We should leave it up to the individual. If they decide to stay, it should help increase the intellectual capital of our own country (only 34% of Americans have college degrees) making us more competitive globally. And if they become citizens, it should not drive down wages because they still need to buy a Tesla and a house in Palo Alto.

Comment Re:The Actual Quote (Score 1) 805

I agree completely. Context is everything. For instance, the murder rate in Baltimore is inextricably wrapped up in race and discussions need to be had without the defensiveness over race. Your other examples are just as valid.

Why I bring it up *here* in the case of Bannon is the willful ignorance of the context. "What? Huh? He overstated the prevalence of Asians in positions of power to scare people (foreigners are taking over AND they're everywhere) and implied that they are not conducive to 'civic society'. But that's not racist. 'Civic society' means blah blah blah"

It's one thing to say, yeah, that's racist but he's not important or he changed his mind or that's not who he really is. But saying "I don't see it" is intellectually disingenuous.

Of course, I always think the Slashdot crowd has higher order reasoning skills. And then I remember this is Slashdot.

Comment Re:I completely agree (Score 1) 805

FORCING the best and the brightest to leave does NOT help the US if THEY DON'T WANT TO GO. If their opportunities are better here to help themselves, the US, and the world, then let them stay. If and when they think they can better serve themselves or the world by returning to their place of birth (hey, they might be US citizens by then, so no longer their homeland) and preaching the gospel of America, then they'll be much better ambassadors.

I understand that's a hard concept for the average Trumpie to understand but if you think about it really hard maybe you'll get it.

You might want to check which side of the partisan divide you're on here, because the Republicans are the ones normally wanting to send foreigners back and the Dems want them to stay....

Comment Re:The Actual Quote (Score 5, Insightful) 805

This is how racial code words work. You are blind to their meaning because you are not impacted by them. They're "just words." Because you will "obviously" never be excluded from "civic society" like Asian CEOs would be excluded. Presumably because I'm guessing you're not Asian or any other minority (or you're Omarosa).

Some examples of code words that will probably never affect you but seriously affect others:

Inner City: “You can’t publicly say black people don’t like to work, but you can say there’s an inner-city culture in which generations of people don’t value work.”

States’ Rights: "while “states’ rights” is a pretty racially neutral issue, you just have to look at what was happening at the moment to realize that everyone knew it translated to the right of states to resist federal mandates to integrate schools and society."

Forced Busing: on its face, was racially neutral, “the Northern analog of states’ rights,” which “allowed the North to express fevered opposition to integration without having to mention race.” After all, kids had been bused to school for quite a while. It was only when the plan took on a racial edge that it became controversial. Politicians didn’t have to say that outright, though—they simply dropped in the phrase to trigger resentment and gain supporters.

Cut Taxes: Dog-whistle politics is partly about demonizing people of color, but it’s also about demonizing government in a way that helps the very rich, says López. So, when Ronald Regan said “cut taxes,” what he was communicating to the middle class was, “so your taxes won’t be wasted on minorities.” A key Reagan operative admitted as much in an interview quoted in Lopez’s book, saying, ” ‘We want to cut taxes’ is a whole lot more abstract than, ‘N*****, n*****.’ ” It continues to be more abstract, and it continues to work.

Law and Order: is a way to draw on an image of minorities as criminals that was used by both Reagan and Clinton. He points to an inverse relationship in Congress between conversations about civil rights and criminal law enforcement. “What you see in the 1960s is that opposition to civil rights becomes ‘what we really need is law and order, to crack down’. ” Of course, the latter is less controversial and, at least on its surface, avoids the issue of race.

‘Welfare’ and ‘Food Stamps’: Welfare, says López, was broadly supported during the New Deal era when it was understood that people could face hardships in their lives that sometimes required government assistance, and, in fact, was purposely limited to white recipients. In this context, it wasn’t heavily stigmatized. Fast-forward to the 1960s, when Lyndon Johnson made it clear that he wanted it to have a racial-justice component. “Then it becomes possible for conservatives to start painting welfare as a transfer of wealth to minorities,” says Lopez. Remember those Reagan speeches about welfare queens? Today, says López, we hear “food stamps” used similarly.

Comment Re:Live here != Work here (Score 1) 805

We should have been sending them home, where they would have had the ability and drive to improve conditions in their home countries.

I almost got to the end with you there. But I would not have sent (or shipped) them home. The best outcome is to give them the freedom to decide how best to use their talents and training. Educating astrophysicists then sending them back to less advanced countries does not seem to be an optimum allocation human resources unless they feel they can make a difference there.

It's clearly better for the host nation to retain the best minds no matter where they're from.

Comment Re:Unintended consequences (Score 1) 52

If you breathe highly magnetic dust into your lungs and have hundreds or thousands of particles that can be attracted to each other within 1mm, that seems well within the realm of dangerous.

The reason I brought it up is because of the last major issue with neodymium magnets were the recall of Buckyballs. 1700 kids were sent to the hospital over a 5 year period (2009-2014) because of swallowing these magnets. That's about a kid a day, and the damage caused is gruesome.

https://gizmodo.com/how-buckyb...

" As it turns out, the powerful magnetic forces that make the balls so much fun to tinker with also make them absurdly dangerous if they end up inside your body. As gastroenterologist Bryan Vartabendian explains on his blog:

When two are ingested they have a way of finding one another. When they catch a loop of intestine, the pressure leads to loss of blood supply, tissue rot, perforation and potentially death.

If that sounds bad, it's really a very mild, clinical description when compared to the reality. The magnets are powerful enough that if you ingest two balls separately they're going find each other no matter what, ripping you apart like slow-moving magnetic bullets if necessary to do so."

Comment Re:Unintended consequences (Score 1) 52

Thanks for the science links. The reason I brought it up is because of the last major issue with neodymium magnets were the recall of Buckyballs. 1700 kids were sent to the hospital over a 5 year period (2009-2014) because of swallowing these magnets. That's about a kid a day, and the damage caused is gruesome.

https://gizmodo.com/how-buckyb...

" As it turns out, the powerful magnetic forces that make the balls so much fun to tinker with also make them absurdly dangerous if they end up inside your body. As gastroenterologist Bryan Vartabendian explains on his blog:

When two are ingested they have a way of finding one another. When they catch a loop of intestine, the pressure leads to loss of blood supply, tissue rot, perforation and potentially death.

If that sounds bad, it's really a very mild, clinical description when compared to the reality. The magnets are powerful enough that if you ingest two balls separately they're going find each other no matter what, ripping you apart like slow-moving magnetic bullets if necessary to do so."

Comment Unintended consequences (Score 3, Interesting) 52

What are the consequences of having super-strong magnetic dust all over the place? Can it get into your lungs? Into your eyes? What if a baby swallows some? Would walking next to a steel car cause perforations through the body?

Not sure I like the idea of more nano particles flying around.

Comment Re:If only (Score 1) 76

Apparently, we don't need coders.

"The university (of California) recently informed about 80 IT workers at its San Francisco campus, including contract employees and vendor contractors, that it hired India-based HCL, under a $50 million contract, to manage infrastructure and networking-related services. The affected employees will leave their jobs in February, after they train their contractor replacements."

https://news.slashdot.org/stor...

Comment Tape that holds computer accessories together (Score 2) 119

I've always wondered what the tape that holds computer accessories together during shipping is called.

For instance, when I get a new printer, the various hinged parts are held down by a tape that adheres strongly to the plastic parts but releases with no residue despite sitting in the box for months/years. I love the stuff but have no idea how to get a roll of it.

Anybody have a pointer?

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