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Comment Re:Not a drone... (Score 1) 644

Just on the offchance that you're asking in good faith, a drone is an unmanned aerial vehicle. The FAA is generally looking at regulating the larger ones (I don't recall offhand what the cutoff size is). If you make a paper airplane and chuck it over someone's fence, that's a drone but it's not big enough to interest the FAA. If you add a camera and a couple motors to your paper airplane it continues to be a drone. If you buy a $1500 quad-copter, that's also a drone and you may need to fill out paperwork with the FAA. If you take a standard 2-seater helicopter, and rig a robot pilot for it with no passengers, that is also a drone. I have no idea whether it's still a drone if a passenger gets in but I suspect it is.

Hope that helps.

Comment Re: see what the Union free work place get's you! (Score 5, Insightful) 297

Having a fiduciary duty to make a profit does not extend to or excuse a violation of law, or asking others to violate law. That's what you "fiduciary duty" people seem not to get; that duty does not supercede law, ethics or morality in any way. Stop making excuses for the sociopaths making the world a worse place for your kids to live, and stop holding their actions up as a paradigm that you and everyone else should follow. Seriously. Just stop.

Comment New business, still not paying taxes (Score 3, Insightful) 115

I guess nobody's told the big guys that the majority of small businesses fail, fail hard, and fail quickly, but not quickly enough to be cheap. Anyone want to bet that within 4 years, 50% of their currently-american software folks will be outsourced and within 8 years that number will be closer to 75%?

Comment Re:What exactly about Mind Control is unscientific (Score 3, Interesting) 148

We are complex machines about which we almost have sufficient understanding to consistently do simple maintenance and repair operations which typically rely primarily on the machine's self-repair mechanisms. We do have the ability to turn these machines off, but we are then unable to turn them back on.

While we have observed that the operations of these machines is sometimes affected by their environment, the difference between the scope of what we know and can do at this time vs "mind control" is the difference between saying, "gee, this computer doesn't run as well when it's really warm out" vs saying "I'm going to write a piece of software for this computer".

It is true that various entities -have- tried various mind control and behavior control experiments before, but the simple fact of the matter is that it's something we have consistently failed to accomplish for decades. For example, look at drug rehab programs. The relapse rate for drug rehab programs is between 40 and 60 percent. If we were actually able to program someone's mind, this would be a prime candidate for reeducation.

Comment ...And that's terrible (Score 1) 2

If you try to keep your exchanges calm and professional (even though it can be quite difficult at times) you are more likely to make headway in any legitimate problem with a customer service rep, who faces angry exchanges of insults all day and will greatly appreciate your unusual courtesy. If you spend more than 5 minutes talking to a rep and can't seem to make any headway, ask to be escalated to their supervisor. Remember that even if someone in the company did something wrong, or something got screwed up, it is likely not the fault of the person you're talking to.

In this case, I suspect that the censorship was not because of any issue with Tmobile but because of the "tirade of insults." After complaints regarding your original post, your followup was probably (correctly) marked as spam and you were silently relegated to the troll corner.

Comment Re:The problem with doing this... (Score 1) 30

As a US college student who -could- have specialized in information security, and didn't, I have to admit that my research into the matter suggested that infosec (aka hacking) is basically for people who would rather stroke their own egos than get paid, remain employed and stay out of jail.

If and when this situation changes -- for example, if I start seeing a bunch of job openings for IT security experts instead of the current bounty system that is so popular with large companies -- then I might reconsider my specialization. Basically, security right now is a hobby for tech people who think starcraft is too mainstream.

Comment Re:Useless, leeching middleman... (Score 0) 103

I would point out the many flaws in your logic, but your use of the word "degenerate" in that context suggests you adhere to a mindset where pointing out the flaws in your logic would only make you angry, and not actually lead you to revise your logic. It is possible that I am mistaken. If that is the case, please elucidate and I will debate your points.

Comment Re:So forgetting a password (Score 1) 796

Nope, because the man could quite possibly be innocent. He may not have a body to produce. And if that's the case, holding an innocent man in jail indefinitely because the man doesn't have a body to prove that he is a murderer is a gross miscarriage of justice. Just reading that, it's blindingly obvious that holding an innocent man in jail indefinitely for failure to incriminate himself is stupid. The same principle applies here.

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