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Comment Real Conspiracies vs. Imagined Ones (Score 1) 680

It is actually comical that the views espoused by these nutty deniers are in fact part of an actual conspiracy amongst oil companies such as Exxon to delay action on climate change as much as possible. Their actions have deeply damaged the level of public discourse in America, and have thus damaged democracy itself.

Comment Re:Nah (Score 4, Insightful) 175

Here is a google search for "car fires". Thousands of pictures of gasoline cars on fire. Here is another search for "Lamborghini Fires". There are many. How many recent Tesla fires can you mention? I'll bet is is approximately two. And yet they are reported ad nauseum. And filthy trolls like you act as if they happen all the time. They don't.

Comment Re:Driving yes, but charging?' (Score 1, Informative) 990

The Tesla Model S90D has a range of 302 miles. That is an up-market car, but when the Tesla Model 3 comes out, it will have a base range of more than 200 miles, and will certainly have options for increased range with a larger battery. The Model 3 is set to cost $35000 base.

As for batteries, the life of the batteries is actually quite good, if the battery packs have a cooling system. Heat kills lithium ion batteries, so if you keep them cool they last a long time (btw. don't buy a Nissan Leaf...last I heard, they don't have battery cooling). Tesla makes their own batteries, and they are aiming for the batteries to last the life of the car. I have heard of Tesla Model S cars with 250000 km on the original battery.

As for hydrogen, please not this again. Read this or this. TL/DR: From a physics point of view, hydrogen is fundamentally inefficient. It is difficult to compress, store, and transport. It is also made from fossil fuels as a bi-product, which is one reason why the idea doesn't seem to want to die, in spite of having problems that CANNOT ever be solved...the fossil fuel industry is pushing it.

Comment Re: Driving yes, but charging? (Score 1) 990

You are being wilfully obtuse if you don't acknowledge the convenience of charging at home. How complicated is it? Come home and plug in your car. When you get up the next day, your car is full. You don't have to drive to a gas station. Your car would have been in the garage at home anyways. The only difference is that you no longer have to go to the gas station and you no longer have to pump gas. Just wake up and go.

Perhaps you do not understand the definition of obtuse. So here is what google gave me:




annoyingly insensitive or slow to understand.

"he wondered if the doctor was being deliberately obtuse"

synonyms: stupid, slow-witted, slow, dull-witted, unintelligent, ignorant, simpleminded, witless;

Comment Re:Driving yes, but charging? (Score -1) 990

The oil industry and fossil car industries are desperate that people not realise how convenient it is to have a charger in your garage. You come home every day and plug in your electric car. When you get up the next day, your car is fully charged. No going to gas stations. No side trips. No waiting. And the cost of electricity is about 70 to 80% less than the equivalent cost of a gasoline car per mile. I can smell the fear in the desperately obtuse propaganda posts being made in this discussion.

Comment Re:Driving yes, but charging? (Score 1, Interesting) 990

How dumb are you that you think that the time you spend charging an EV and the time you spend filling a car are comparable, when the EV can be charged overnight at home, or at work, while you are in your office?

Perhaps this: 'It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.' — Upton Sinclair

Seriously, when I see someone being so wilfully obtuse, I really start to suspect that their motivations are not really towards understanding the truth. It is well documented that wealthy parties such as the Koch brothers are putting a fair amount amount of money towards anti-electric car propaganda campaigns. Is it really a stretch to imagine that some posters (and moderators) are either getting paid, or are mindlessly acting on propaganda paid by oil industries?

Comment Re:Driving yes, but charging? (Score 2) 990

I spend less of my time charging my EV than you spend filling your car's gas tank.

I arrive home, plug in and leave it. I don't have to stand by the car waiting for it to fill. In the morning, I unplug it. A few seconds to plug in and another few seconds to unplug. How long do you spend standing by your car at the gas station?

Why is this moderated as "off-topic". It is perfectly on topic. When you have charging installed at home and/or at work, you spend almost no time "fuelling" your car, in that the only things you have to do is do plug the car in, and unplug it when you leave. Your car would have been parked in any case. Thus for those of us who can install a dryer plug and a charger in our garage, or who can find charging at work, electric cars are in fact more convenient for daily commuting than gasoline cars.

Comment Re:Gopher and Dungeons and Dragons (Score 1) 225

I remember Gopher. I think I used in around 1990-91. I also remember using Usenet... alt.wesleycrusher.die.die.die It was neat to have an actual email address in 1990.

In 1992, I picked up a paper pamphlet that described the idea of hypertext and the NCSA Mosaic browser. I read that the new protocol allowed individual words in paragraphs to become clickable links to entirely new pages. I distinctly remember thinking "holy shit! This is powerful". Having messed about with Gopher, I realized the limitations of Gopher's framework of folder navigation. Imagine if the New York Times used Gopher folders for its website. Click on the "Newest Stories" folder. Click on the International folder. Click on a story document. Then go back up. Gopher was cool because I could hop about around various networked computers. However, hypertext was so much more elegant and flexible in comparison.

Comment Re:Bork (Score 1) 281

Further suggesting that this problem is intentional

Messing with Steam. Now effing up Linux partitions. Of course this is intentional corporate policy. It just reminds me why I will never deliberately give MS a single cent of money. It also reminds me to use alternatives to Office, such as Google Docs, LaTeX, and Open Office.

Comment Re:Wooo AstroTurfing (Score 1) 128

Jobs worshipper detected. Your turtleneck is a bit too tight this month.

No not necessarily. I personally do not like IOS. I think it is an overly restrictive black box-ish OS that puts too much control over MY computer in the hands of Apple. I also do not like that Apple seems to be pushing for OSX and IOS to merge. I use a OSX and Linux, and if Apple pisses me off to much, I will shift more towards Linux, and perhaps towards a Chrome-book/Android (never Microsoft!).

However you cannot deny the magnitude of what Jobs accomplished as a leader of Apple. He led his company to create the Mac. Then he was kicked out, and MBA Schulley nearly bankrupted the company. Meanwhile he led the creation of the brilliant NeXT OS. He returned to Apple, used NeXT OS to create OSX, and subsequently led Apple to its becoming the world's most profitable company.

The moniker "fanboy" is really an insult which is empty of thought. If I admire a person or a company, I can assure you I have well considered reasons.

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