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Submission + - India Test Fires First Scramjet Engine (thehindu.com)

William Robinson writes: India test fired Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV), a research rocket with a solid booster carrying advanced scramjet engines, which is Air Breathing Propulsion System that uses hydrogen as fuel and oxygen from the atmosphere air as the oxidiser. Since 70 per cent of the propellant mass is oxidiser, using oxidiser directly from air makes flights significantly cheaper. Also air breathing technique makes is less prone to failure because it uses less moving parts. India is fourth country to test this technology after US, Russia and EU.

Submission + - Mediterranean diet better for the heart than taking statins, major study suggest (telegraph.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: A Mediterranean diet could be better than statins at reducing the risk of an early death for millions of Britons, research suggests.

Leading heart experts said patients should be prescribed the diet — rich in fruit, vegetables, fish, nuts, whole grains and olive oil — before being put on drugs.

In the first major study to look at the impact of the Med diet on survival of heart patients, experts found it cut the chances of early death by 37 per cent.

Previous research has found just taking statins cuts mortality by 18 per cent. Experts said the figures were not directly comparable, and that many heart patients could get maximum benefit by doing both.

Submission + - SPAM: Poll: Favourite use of Pi

boaworm writes: Options:
* As a basis for calculus
* Multiply any estimate before submitting to management
* As dessert

Submission + - The Rise and Fall of the Gopher Protocol (minnpost.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Tim Gihring at MinnPost talks to the creators of what was, briefly, the biggest thing in the internet, Gopher. Gopher, for those who don't know or have forgotten, was the original linked internet application, allowing you to change pages and servers easily, though a hierarchical menu system. It was quick, it was easy to use, and important for this day and age, it didn't have Flash.

Submission + - Linux 4.8 Prepares NVIDIA Pascal & Raspberry Pi 3 SoC Support, AMD Overclock (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Linux 4.8 feature merge window was open the past two weeks and it culminated with this evening's release of Linux 4.8-rc1. Now that the merge window is over, it's easy to grasp a good look at the Linux 4.8 features. Coming to the Linux 4.8 kernel is initial NVIDIA Pascal support via the open-source Nouveau driver, initial support for the Broadcom SoC found in the Raspberry Pi 3, AMD GPU overclocking support for the open-source driver, multiple new security safeguards, file-system improvements, and more.

Submission + - SPAM: Bulk of melted fuel in Fukushima no. 2 reactor at bottom of pressure vessel

AmiMoJo writes: Most of the melted nuclear fuel inside the No. 2 reactor at the disaster-hit Fukushima No. 1 power plant is likely located at the bottom of its pressure vessel, plant operator TEPCO has revealed. According to a study that used a cosmic ray imaging system, an estimated 130 tons of the so-called fuel debris remains at the bottom of the vessel. A decision on how to remove fuel from the reactors is due by 2017. Reactors 2 and 3 are expected to be flooded with water to make the process easier, but reactor 1 will have to be done dry, which is much more difficult and unprecedented.

Submission + - Inside the BlackHat Las Vegas NoC where even the Zeus trojan is cool (theregister.co.uk)

mask.of.sanity writes: Neil Wyler and Bart Stump are responsible for managing what is probably the world’s most hostile wireless network. They are part of a team of 23 who run the network operations centre at the Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas taking place this week, and reveal how they need to loosen their normally strict defensive rulebooks for the conference networks to prevent only the worst attacks from taking place.

Comment Re:As a C programmer (Score 1) 315

Reading a few O'Reilly books might cut it for web monkeys, but then again, anything you can learn from an O'Reilly book can also be learned just as well by someone in India or eastern Europe. Real programmers can re-implement chunks of the standard c library with their own mods because they know what's going on.

Are you implying that there are no "real" programmers in eastern Europe or in India?

Submission + - When is 'Unnecessary' Code Necessary? 1

theodp writes: Catching himself terminating statements with semicolons out of habit when none were needed, Rick Wicklin asks: Do you write unnecessary code? And while Wicklin tries to skip certain unnecessary statements, there are others that he finds, well, necessary. "Sometimes I include optional statements in my programs for clarity, readability, or to practice defensive programming," he explains. Wicklin's post is geared towards SAS programming, but the question of when to include technically-unnecessary code — e.g., variable declarations, superfluous punctuation, block constructs for single statements, values for optional parameters that are the defaults, debugging/validation statements, non-critical error handling, explicitly destroying objects that would otherwise be deleted on exit, labeled NEXT statements, full qualification of objects/methods, unneeded code from templates — is a language-agnostic one. So when-and-why do you find it necessary to include 'unnecessary' code in your programs? And are you tolerant of co-workers' unnecessary code choices, or do you sometimes go all Tabs-vs-Spaces (YouTube) on them?

Submission + - SPAM: How Obama sold us the Iran deal

mi writes: Maybe, it is not just Vladimir Putin, who uses an army of online trolls to push his agenda. The New York Times piece — already dissected by Weekly Standard — details, among other things, that, as the officials were officially concluding, what has already been agreed upon with the Iranians, a "war room" in Washington dealt with reporters and lawmakers, selling the deal to the American public:

In the spring of last year, legions of arms-control experts began popping up at think tanks and on social media, and then became key sources for hundreds of often-clueless reporters. “We created an echo chamber,” he [Ben Rhodes, the main seller of the deal -mi] admitted, when asked to explain the onslaught of freshly minted experts cheerleading for the deal. “They were saying things that validated what we had given them to say.”

Of course, Slashdot-readers — the supposedly sophisticated lot of nerds — didn't escape the government-architected brainwashing either...
Link to Original Source

Submission + - SPAM: FOSSA - Now we need feedback from real Free Software experts

Noonian Soong writes: The "Free and Open Source Security Audit" (FOSSA) is a project by the European Union whose aim it is to increase security of Free Software used by European institutions. Unfortunately, after initially asking the public for feedback, communication broke down while the EU was reviewing information and their report now is full of misconceptions and factual errors.

Because the report shows such a lack of understanding of the underlying issues, the Free Software Foundation Europe is asking for feedback from people who are actually involved in Free Software so they can pass that information on to the EU who will hopefully rectify the current situation. The alternative is letting the EU spend the money dedicated to code review without any real impact.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Visual Studio 2015 c++ compiler secretly inserts telemetry code into binaries (infoq.com) 4

edxwelch writes: Reddit user "sammiesdog" discovered recently that the Visual Studio 2015 c++ compiler was inserting calls to a Microsoft telemetery function into binaries.
"I compiled a simple program with only main(). When looking at the compiled binary in Ida, I see a calls for telemetry_main_invoke_trigger and telemetry_main_return_trigger. I can not find documentation for these calls, either on the web or in the options page."
Only after the discovery did Steve Carroll, the dev manager for Visual C++, admit to the feature and posted a work around. The "feature" is to be removed in Update 3 of the product.

Comment Re:Moore's law dead? (Score 3, Interesting) 44

Moore said density (transistor count), not your "power". Must I always correct those who failed History?

No, you must not!

Moore's law is not a law, it's just an observation (and maybe self-fulfilling prophecy). And the observation of computers getting more and more powerful was also correct. So why not associate one with the other!

Submission + - Systemd now kills processes when you sign out (pcworld.com) 4

walterbyrd writes: The initialization software systemd has now been integrated into most popular Linux distributions, including the latest versions of Ubuntu. But a change in systemd 230 alters the way Linux and other UNIX-like operating systems have worked for decades, and some Linux users aren’t pleased.

Systemd now kills processes when you sign out Thanks to a new change, systemd will automatically kill a user’s processes when that user logs out. Previously, it was possible to start long-running processes that remained running, even when you signed out. You could use the tmux, screen, or nohup commands to ensure that a process remained running. Systemd will now kill all those leftover processes to clean things up.

This change is being debated in Debian’s bug tracker, and on Fedora’s mailing list. On Fedora’s mailing list, systemd’s Lennart Poettering explained that systemd is designed to be “a process babysitter.” Red Hat’s DJ Delorie expressed why he and some other Linux users are frustrated: “It’s becoming a user nanny instead. I wish it would stop trying to enforce its ‘my way or the highway’ approach to system rules. I’ve been playing whack-a-mole trying to keep up with all the tweaks I need (assuming I can find them) to let me do what I want to do with my own machine.”

There’s a new secret handshake Of course, systemd provides a way to disable this behavior and keep processes running, if that’s what you want. To do this, a system administrator can set the “KillUserProcesses=no” option in systemd’s configuration file at /etc/systemd/logind.conf. Linux distributions could also choose to disable this systemd feature for all their users, which is what some Debian and Fedora users are asking for. In both cases, the feature would be disabled systemwide.

If just a specific user wants to run processes that are left alone by systemd, that user has to enable “lingering” for their account, with the systemd-run command preceding the tmux, screen, or nohup commands. So, if you end up using a Linux distribution with systemd 230 or newer that has this option enabled, you’ll need to run tmux, screen, and nohup commands in a systemd-specific way. It would make sense for these tools to become systemd-aware to negate this new secret handshake, but they aren’t, and users will therefore need to use this new workaround.

Submission + - 202.0 Demetrios: The Big Cynical Adventure: A Big Cynical Review (The Gamer's L (the-gamers-lounge.com)

kube00 writes: Having been an afficionado of adventure games over the years, I understand that they aren't without their difficulties. For every Monkey Island or Space Quest, there are four that take the route of Phantasmagoria* and about six different games featuring puzzles with solutions that read like poorly translated stereo instructions. While it's the easiest genre to design for (no combat algorithms or anything like that, clean narrative with a few branches) it's also one of the easiest to screw up. All it takes is one puzzle where processor speed determines difficulty, or pouring whiskey into the gas tank of a car to fuel up a spaceship, or an
infuriating pixel hunt and instantly people will throw up their hands and
uninstall in annoyance.

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