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Submission + - Deepest water found 1000km down, a third of way to Earth's core (newscientist.com)

schwit1 writes: JULES VERNE’s idea of an ocean deep below the surface in Journey to the Centre of the Earth may not have been too far off. Earth’s mantle may contain many oceans’ worth of water – with the deepest 1000 kilometres down.

“If it wasn’t down there, we would all be submerged,” says Steve Jacobsen at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, whose team made the discovery. “This implies a bigger reservoir of water on the planet than previously thought.”

This water is much deeper than any seen before, at a third of the way to the edge of Earth’s core. Its presence was indicated by a diamond spat out 90 million years ago by a volcano near the São Luíz river in Juina, Brazil.

Submission + - Old DOS games inspires visual artist's work (wordpress.com)

farrellj writes: For all you old DOS Gaming fans!

Here is what the artist has to say about the micro-paintings:
"The 90s were the golden age of graphic adventures for LucasArts, Westwood Studios, Sierra and many more. These were games written by playful geeks for geeks – entertainment for the emergent technocracy that was daring, quirky and intelligent.

To commemorate early PC gaming heroes and heroines, I’ve created this series of tiny paintings of some of my favourite DOS games."

Check it out here:
https://synescape.wordpress.co...

Submission + - Barnes & Noble to release a $50 Android tablet for Black Friday

Robotech_Master writes: Barnes & Noble has decided to imitate Amazon yet again, as it comes out with a $50 Android tablet just in time for the holidays. The specs are similar to slightly better than the $50 Fire, but the kicker is this tablet will ship with plain-vanilla Marshmallow Android 6.0 and the Google Play utilities--unlike the Fire, which limits its users to only those apps Amazon deems suitable to offer. Might this be enough to rescue the ailing Nook brand?

Submission + - Groundbreaking Paper on arXiv derives Gravity from Holographic Principle (arxiv.org)

vikingpower writes: Dutch prodigy and Amsterdam University Professor Erik Verlinde published a paper on arXiv, yesterday November 7, titled "Emergent Gravity and the Dark Universe". In the paper, Verlinde derives gravity from the so-called Holographic Principle, which — simply put — states that gravity emerges from the interplay between and entropy re-arrangement of sub-atomic "strings" that live in a negatively curved space-time. At that level, "...spacetime and gravity are emergent from an underlying microscopic description in which they have no a priori meaning" . Most importantly, Verlinde's paper has as a consequence that Dark Matter, nemesis of many an astronomer, is nothing more than an illusion. Verlinde, who was awarded the Dutch national Spinoza science prize in the recent past, already completed the tour de force of deriving Newtonian gravity from the same principles in a 2010 paper, also on arXiv. We are probably looking at Nobel-prize material here, as Verlinde is acknowledged by his peers to "go one better than Einstein's General Theory of Relativity".

Submission + - The NES Mini is a $60 single board computer (and it runs Linux)

romiz writes: As the first samples of the NES Mini reach reviewers, its hardware specifications are now easy to find. With a quad-core ARM Cortex-A7, 256 MiB of RAM, and 512 MiB of NAND Flash, it is typical of the hardware found in Linux single board computers, like the RaspberryPi 2. Surprisingly for Nintendo, there does not seem to be any custom components in it, and it looks like it even does run Linux. The GPL license for the kernel and many other open source components is visible in the legal information screen. The source, however, is not available on Nintendo's open source page yet.

But it is the re-edition a 1980s video console: there is no network access, no hardware expansion port, and the 30 games cannot be changed. Changing the system runnning on it will probably be difficult.

Submission + - China Launches New Heavy Lifting Rocket (space.com)

hackingbear writes: China launched its second new rocket in the year. The Long March 5 rocket, lifted off from the Wenchang launch center on Hainan Island, off China's southern coast, at 8:43 a.m. EDT (1000 GMT; 8:43 p.m. Beijing time), carring to orbit an experimental satellite called Shijian-17, which is designed to test electric-propulsion technology. Capable of 25 metric ton payload to LEO, LM 5 is among the most powerful rockets in service. Besides scheduled launch of China's upcoming space station, the Long March 5 will also loft Chang'e-5, a robotic sample-return mission to the moon. Chang'e-5 is currently scheduled to lift off sometime next year, Chinese space officials have said.

Submission + - Mimicking nature turns sewage into biocrude oil in minutes (newatlas.com) 1

Big Hairy Ian writes: Biofuels are often touted as an alternative to fossil fuels, but many depend on raw materials that would quickly become scarce if production were scaled up. As an alternative to these alternatives, the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has found a way to potentially produce 30 million barrels of biocrude oil per year from the 34 billion gal (128 billion liters) of raw sewage that Americans create every day.

Submission + - Poll: Should Samsung update old phones an extra year?

tacarat writes: Since people can't update their phones to the newer model, should Samsung provide an extra year of meaningful firmware and security updates?
1) Yes
2) No
3) I switched manufacturers
4) Cowboy Neal

Comment Re:$$$ Workstations (Score 1) 310

... basically we need a technology that re-enables single threaded performance.

And we need lower prices. Low prices drove the computer boom, not raw power.

In the past, process shrinks led to cheaper CPUs. This is not happening any more.

Tablets/(smart)phones are selling good, because they got cheep. Then their power increased somewhat, and that led two more expensive phones. Beside that, they wear out more quickly and brake more often -- this is what sustains their sales.

Submission + - Google Chrome memory tweaks in next version

justthinkit writes: Google Chrome is arguably the best browser and the biggest memory hog. Presently. But the Google engineers are hard at work, optimizing the next version of Chrome. Will this be an important, or just another incremental, upgrade?

Submission + - Commodore C64 Survives Over 25 Years Balancing Drive Shafts In Auto Repair Shop (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: One common gripe in the twenty-first century is that nothing is built to last anymore. Even complex, expensive computers seem to have a relatively short shelf-life nowadays. However, one computer in a small auto repair shop in Gdansk, Poland has survived for the last twenty-five years against all odds. The computer in question here is a Commodore C64 that has been balancing driveshafts non-stop for a quarter of a century. The C64C looks like it would fit right in with a scene from Fallout 4 and has even survived a nasty flood. This Commodore 64 contains a few homemade aspects, however. The old computer uses a sinusoidal waveform generator and piezo vibration sensor in order to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain or force by converting them to an electrical charge. The C64C interprets these signals to help balance the driveshafts in vehicles.

Submission + - (Not Quite) Open Source Hardware? 1

Ichijo writes: One hardware project that calls itself "open source" doesn't want to make its hardware design source files publicly available because doing so would, in their words, "make it very trivial for e.g Chinese companies to start producing cheap clones... we’d be getting support requests for hardware we had no idea of the quality of." This answer was in response to a request by a user who wants to use the design in his own projects.

Have any other open source hardware projects run into support issues from people owning cheap "clones"? Have clones been produced even without the hardware design source files?

Submission + - What is employers obsession with programming languages? 1

An anonymous reader writes: Just got off the phone with a recruiter for a company and the lady asked if I had 3-4 years C++ and 3-4 years Java experience. Okay, so first off, C++ and Java are two different programming languages used for two completely different purposes.

C++ being used mainly for low-level platform specific programming and Java being platform independent. My response was I programmed in C++ throughout college, but haven't worked any jobs specifically writing C++ and I've had Java experience in past jobs, but mostly used C# which was similar.

She said, "Oh well we are only looking for those two languages so thanks anyways". Is it just me or is this absolutely insane? It's like wanting to hire a mechanic who has 3-4 years experience working with just 1978 ford trucks. I mean really? How did we get to this point as engineers?

As any developer worth their weight in salt can attest, the languages are so similar it's kind of difficult to distinguish between them looking at syntax alone and if you've got a computer science background or equiv what's it really matter if the underlying OOP concepts are the same.

Is this just a result of incompetent managers and ignorant recruiters or as engineers have we set ourselves up by succumbing to a label such as Java Engineer or C# Programmer.

Should I just say yes, and move forward with the interview? I mean, I could probably answer most C++/Java programming questions unless they are truly looking for people who spend all their time memorizing specific libraries or API's which in my opinion is insane. I equate that to trying to memorize a phone book. You can but why would you want to?

Not only is it frustrating as a job candidate, but it seems to really be limiting your hiring pool to a small few who by chance happen to work in a couple different programming languages over the course of their career. How do most of you handle this sort of thing?

Submission + - Switzerland Votes For Legal State Surveillance In Referendum

Mickeycaskill writes: Secret service agents are able to legally hack computers in Switzerland after the country voted for a law that allowed them to do so in order to prevent terrorist attacks.

Switzerland practices ‘direct democracy’, a model which allows citizens to propose a referendum to be held on any law.

Two thirds of voters came out in favour of the law despite critics warnings that it could lead to arbitrary surveillance. It is likely this was galvanized by the spate of terrorist attacks that have occurred in Europe this year.

“It gives Switzerland modern tools to respond to current threats,” Defence Minister Guy Parmelin said.

Submission + - Ask Slashtot: How to determine if your IOT device is part of a botnet? 1

galgon writes: There has been a number of stories of IoT devices becoming part of
Botnets and being used in DDOS Attacks. If these devices are seemingly working correctly to the user how would they ever know the device was compromised? Is there anything the average user can do to detect when they have a misbehaving device on their network?

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