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Comment Re:$$$ Workstations (Score 1) 310

... basically we need a technology that re-enables single threaded performance.

And we need lower prices. Low prices drove the computer boom, not raw power.

In the past, process shrinks led to cheaper CPUs. This is not happening any more.

Tablets/(smart)phones are selling good, because they got cheep. Then their power increased somewhat, and that led two more expensive phones. Beside that, they wear out more quickly and brake more often -- this is what sustains their sales.

Submission + - Google Chrome memory tweaks in next version

justthinkit writes: Google Chrome is arguably the best browser and the biggest memory hog. Presently. But the Google engineers are hard at work, optimizing the next version of Chrome. Will this be an important, or just another incremental, upgrade?

Submission + - Commodore C64 Survives Over 25 Years Balancing Drive Shafts In Auto Repair Shop (

MojoKid writes: One common gripe in the twenty-first century is that nothing is built to last anymore. Even complex, expensive computers seem to have a relatively short shelf-life nowadays. However, one computer in a small auto repair shop in Gdansk, Poland has survived for the last twenty-five years against all odds. The computer in question here is a Commodore C64 that has been balancing driveshafts non-stop for a quarter of a century. The C64C looks like it would fit right in with a scene from Fallout 4 and has even survived a nasty flood. This Commodore 64 contains a few homemade aspects, however. The old computer uses a sinusoidal waveform generator and piezo vibration sensor in order to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain or force by converting them to an electrical charge. The C64C interprets these signals to help balance the driveshafts in vehicles.

Submission + - (Not Quite) Open Source Hardware? 1

Ichijo writes: One hardware project that calls itself "open source" doesn't want to make its hardware design source files publicly available because doing so would, in their words, "make it very trivial for e.g Chinese companies to start producing cheap clones... we’d be getting support requests for hardware we had no idea of the quality of." This answer was in response to a request by a user who wants to use the design in his own projects.

Have any other open source hardware projects run into support issues from people owning cheap "clones"? Have clones been produced even without the hardware design source files?

Submission + - What is employers obsession with programming languages? 1

An anonymous reader writes: Just got off the phone with a recruiter for a company and the lady asked if I had 3-4 years C++ and 3-4 years Java experience. Okay, so first off, C++ and Java are two different programming languages used for two completely different purposes.

C++ being used mainly for low-level platform specific programming and Java being platform independent. My response was I programmed in C++ throughout college, but haven't worked any jobs specifically writing C++ and I've had Java experience in past jobs, but mostly used C# which was similar.

She said, "Oh well we are only looking for those two languages so thanks anyways". Is it just me or is this absolutely insane? It's like wanting to hire a mechanic who has 3-4 years experience working with just 1978 ford trucks. I mean really? How did we get to this point as engineers?

As any developer worth their weight in salt can attest, the languages are so similar it's kind of difficult to distinguish between them looking at syntax alone and if you've got a computer science background or equiv what's it really matter if the underlying OOP concepts are the same.

Is this just a result of incompetent managers and ignorant recruiters or as engineers have we set ourselves up by succumbing to a label such as Java Engineer or C# Programmer.

Should I just say yes, and move forward with the interview? I mean, I could probably answer most C++/Java programming questions unless they are truly looking for people who spend all their time memorizing specific libraries or API's which in my opinion is insane. I equate that to trying to memorize a phone book. You can but why would you want to?

Not only is it frustrating as a job candidate, but it seems to really be limiting your hiring pool to a small few who by chance happen to work in a couple different programming languages over the course of their career. How do most of you handle this sort of thing?

Submission + - Switzerland Votes For Legal State Surveillance In Referendum

Mickeycaskill writes: Secret service agents are able to legally hack computers in Switzerland after the country voted for a law that allowed them to do so in order to prevent terrorist attacks.

Switzerland practices ‘direct democracy’, a model which allows citizens to propose a referendum to be held on any law.

Two thirds of voters came out in favour of the law despite critics warnings that it could lead to arbitrary surveillance. It is likely this was galvanized by the spate of terrorist attacks that have occurred in Europe this year.

“It gives Switzerland modern tools to respond to current threats,” Defence Minister Guy Parmelin said.

Submission + - Ask Slashtot: How to determine if your IOT device is part of a botnet? 1

galgon writes: There has been a number of stories of IoT devices becoming part of
Botnets and being used in DDOS Attacks. If these devices are seemingly working correctly to the user how would they ever know the device was compromised? Is there anything the average user can do to detect when they have a misbehaving device on their network?

Submission + - Android-x86 6.0 Released to Let You Run Android 6.0 Marshmallow on Your PC

prisoninmate writes: Android-x86 6.0 has been in the works since early this year, and it received a total of two RC (Release Candidate) builds during its entire development cycle, one in June and another in August. After joining the Remix OS team, Chih-Wei Huang now has all the reasons to update and improve its Android-x86 system for the latest Android releases. Therefore, as you might have guessed already, Android-x86 6.0 is the first stable version of the project to be based on Google's Linux kernel-based Android 6.0 Marshmallow mobile operating system, and includes the most recent AOSP (Android Open Source Project) security updates too. Under the hood, Android-x86 6.0 is using the long-term supported Linux 4.4.20 kernel with an updated graphics stack based on Mesa 12.0.2 3D Graphics Library, and offers support for Samsung's F2FS file system for SSD drives, better Wi-Fi support after resume and suspend, and initial HDMI audio support.

Submission + - India Test Fires First Scramjet Engine (

William Robinson writes: India test fired Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV), a research rocket with a solid booster carrying advanced scramjet engines, which is Air Breathing Propulsion System that uses hydrogen as fuel and oxygen from the atmosphere air as the oxidiser. Since 70 per cent of the propellant mass is oxidiser, using oxidiser directly from air makes flights significantly cheaper. Also air breathing technique makes is less prone to failure because it uses less moving parts. India is fourth country to test this technology after US, Russia and EU.

Submission + - Mediterranean diet better for the heart than taking statins, major study suggest (

An anonymous reader writes: A Mediterranean diet could be better than statins at reducing the risk of an early death for millions of Britons, research suggests.

Leading heart experts said patients should be prescribed the diet — rich in fruit, vegetables, fish, nuts, whole grains and olive oil — before being put on drugs.

In the first major study to look at the impact of the Med diet on survival of heart patients, experts found it cut the chances of early death by 37 per cent.

Previous research has found just taking statins cuts mortality by 18 per cent. Experts said the figures were not directly comparable, and that many heart patients could get maximum benefit by doing both.

Submission + - SPAM: Poll: Favourite use of Pi

boaworm writes: Options:
* As a basis for calculus
* Multiply any estimate before submitting to management
* As dessert

Submission + - The Rise and Fall of the Gopher Protocol (

An anonymous reader writes: Tim Gihring at MinnPost talks to the creators of what was, briefly, the biggest thing in the internet, Gopher. Gopher, for those who don't know or have forgotten, was the original linked internet application, allowing you to change pages and servers easily, though a hierarchical menu system. It was quick, it was easy to use, and important for this day and age, it didn't have Flash.

Submission + - Linux 4.8 Prepares NVIDIA Pascal & Raspberry Pi 3 SoC Support, AMD Overclock (

An anonymous reader writes: The Linux 4.8 feature merge window was open the past two weeks and it culminated with this evening's release of Linux 4.8-rc1. Now that the merge window is over, it's easy to grasp a good look at the Linux 4.8 features. Coming to the Linux 4.8 kernel is initial NVIDIA Pascal support via the open-source Nouveau driver, initial support for the Broadcom SoC found in the Raspberry Pi 3, AMD GPU overclocking support for the open-source driver, multiple new security safeguards, file-system improvements, and more.

Submission + - SPAM: Bulk of melted fuel in Fukushima no. 2 reactor at bottom of pressure vessel

AmiMoJo writes: Most of the melted nuclear fuel inside the No. 2 reactor at the disaster-hit Fukushima No. 1 power plant is likely located at the bottom of its pressure vessel, plant operator TEPCO has revealed. According to a study that used a cosmic ray imaging system, an estimated 130 tons of the so-called fuel debris remains at the bottom of the vessel. A decision on how to remove fuel from the reactors is due by 2017. Reactors 2 and 3 are expected to be flooded with water to make the process easier, but reactor 1 will have to be done dry, which is much more difficult and unprecedented.

Submission + - Inside the BlackHat Las Vegas NoC where even the Zeus trojan is cool (

mask.of.sanity writes: Neil Wyler and Bart Stump are responsible for managing what is probably the world’s most hostile wireless network. They are part of a team of 23 who run the network operations centre at the Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas taking place this week, and reveal how they need to loosen their normally strict defensive rulebooks for the conference networks to prevent only the worst attacks from taking place.

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