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Submission + - A battery made of molten metals (mit.edu) 2

Z00L00K writes: This story came out a while ago, but didn't seem to surface:

A novel rechargeable battery developed at MIT could one day play a critical role in the massive expansion of solar generation needed to mitigate climate change by midcentury. Designed to store energy on the electric grid, the high-capacity battery consists of molten metals that naturally separate to form two electrodes in layers on either side of the molten salt electrolyte between them. Tests with cells made of low-cost, Earth-abundant materials confirm that the liquid battery operates efficiently without losing significant capacity or mechanically degrading — common problems in today’s batteries with solid electrodes. The MIT researchers have already demonstrated a simple, low-cost process for manufacturing prototypes of their battery, and future plans call for field tests on small-scale power grids that include intermittent generating sources such as solar and wind.


Submission + - Imagination Technologies Previews New 7nm Process Furian GPUs (imgtec.com)

dryriver writes: Imagination Technologies' 28nm process PowerVR GPUs were mostly known for applications like low power mobile gaming (smartphones, tablets) until today. Imagination Technologies has just announced a new GPU architecture named "Furian". Furian GPUs will go as low as 7nm and target 4K 120FPS VR HDR gaming instead of lower end mobile gaming. They will also accelerate ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) and Neural Net based realtime computer vision applications. Imagination technologies claims great advances in GFLOPs density, fill rate and gaming performance density — 90% increase over the old Rogue architecture on that last one. Vulkan and OpenVX are supported. Just how powerful the new Furian GPUs will be hasn't been announced yet. Will Furian possibly compete with Nvidia, AMD and Intel GPUs in the PC gaming space?

Submission + - Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach their Kids About Money (amazon.in)

Somesh Mukharjee writes: Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach their Kids About Money that the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!
We absoultely recommend this book as a step 1 into financial literacy. Have you been wondering why despite years of working and significant raises, your savings are still absymmal. Why at the end of each month you still seem to be out of money? Then this book is for you

Submission + - How the IBM 1403 Printer Hammered Out 1,100 Lines Per Minute (ieee.org)

schwit1 writes: The IBM 1460, which went on sale in 1963, was an upgrade of the 1401. Twice as fast, with a 6-microsecond cycle time, it came with a high-speed 1403 Model 3 line printer.

The 1403 printer was incredibly fast. It had five identical sets of 48 embossed metal characters like the kind you’d find on a typewriter, all connected together on a horizontal chain loop that revolved at 5.2 meters per second behind the face of a continuous ream of paper. Between the paper and the character chain was a strip of ink tape, again just like a typewriter’s. But rather than pressing the character to the paper through the ink tape, the 1403 did it backward, pressing the paper against the high-speed character chain through the ink tape with the aid of tiny hammers.

Over the years, IBM came out with eight models of the 1403. Some versions had 132 hammers, one for each printable column, and each was individually actuated with an electromagnet. When a character on the character chain aligned with a column that was supposed to contain that character, the electromagnetic hammer for that column would actuate, pounding the paper through the ink tape and into the character in 11 microseconds.

With all 132 hammers actuating and the chain blasting along, the 1403 was stupendously noisy, ... The Model 3, which replaced the character chain with slugs sliding in a track driven by gears, took just 55 milliseconds to print a single line. When printing a subset of characters, its speed rose from 1,100 lines per minute to 1,400 lines per minute.

Submission + - Exercise is good but it won't help you lose weight, say doctors (theguardian.com)

schwit1 writes: Being dangerously overweight is all down to bad diet rather than a lack of exercise, according to a trio of doctors who have reopened the debate about whether food, sedentary lifestyles or both are responsible for the obesity epidemic.

In an article for a leading health journal the authors – who include British cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra, an outspoken critic of the food industry – accuse food and drink firms such as Coca-Cola of having wrongly emphasised how physical activity and sport can help prevent people becoming very overweight.

The truth, they say, is that while physical activity is useful in reducing the risk of developing heart disease, dementia and other conditions, it “does not promote weight loss”.

Submission + - Software Goes Through 'Beta Testing.' Should Online College Courses? (Some Do) (edsurge.com)

jyosim writes: Coursera has recruited a volunteer corp of more than 2,500 beta testers to try out MOOCs before they launch. Other free online course providers have set up systems that catch things like mistakes in tests, or just whether videos are confusing.

Traditional colleges have shied away from checking online course content before going live, citing academic freedom. But some colleges are developing checklists to judge course design and accessibility.

“It would be lovely if universities would consider ways of adopting the practice of beta testing,” says Phillip Long, chief innovation officer and associate vice provost for learning sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. One factor, though, is cost. “How do you scale that at a university that has thousands of courses being taught,” he asks.

EdSurge asks: How much beta testing makes sense for courses, and what’s the best way to do it?

Submission + - Is Your TV Watching You? Vizio Busted for Spying on Customers (audioholics.com)

Audiofan writes: On February 6, Vizio went from being the toast of TV buyers everywhere to an electronic spy inside the homes of millions. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that Vizio will pay out a settlement of $2.2 million for illegally selling data collected on some 11-million consumers including viewing habits as well as demographic info on customers. Learn how to protect yourself from your own smart TV, because it's not just Vizio, just about brand of smart TV has similar capabilities.

Submission + - ASUS takes on Raspberry Pi with its 4K-capable, Kodi-ready Tinker Board (betanews.com)

BrianFagioli writes: If you love Raspberry Pi, but require a little more power for your projects, then ASUSâ(TM)s Tinker Board could be just what youâ(TM)re looking for.

Although thereâ(TM)s no shortage of Raspberry Pi alternatives, the low-cost Tinker Board is better than most because its quad-core 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 processor has the oomph to handle 4K video and 24-bit audio, and it comes with twice as much RAM as the latest Pi.

Submission + - SPAM: Deepest water found 1000km down, a third of way to Earth's core

schwit1 writes: JULES VERNE’s idea of an ocean deep below the surface in Journey to the Centre of the Earth may not have been too far off. Earth’s mantle may contain many oceans’ worth of water – with the deepest 1000 kilometres down.

“If it wasn’t down there, we would all be submerged,” says Steve Jacobsen at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, whose team made the discovery. “This implies a bigger reservoir of water on the planet than previously thought.”

This water is much deeper than any seen before, at a third of the way to the edge of Earth’s core. Its presence was indicated by a diamond spat out 90 million years ago by a volcano near the São Luíz river in Juina, Brazil.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Old DOS games inspires visual artist's work (wordpress.com)

farrellj writes: For all you old DOS Gaming fans!

Here is what the artist has to say about the micro-paintings:
"The 90s were the golden age of graphic adventures for LucasArts, Westwood Studios, Sierra and many more. These were games written by playful geeks for geeks – entertainment for the emergent technocracy that was daring, quirky and intelligent.

To commemorate early PC gaming heroes and heroines, I’ve created this series of tiny paintings of some of my favourite DOS games."

Check it out here:
https://synescape.wordpress.co...

Submission + - Barnes & Noble to release a $50 Android tablet for Black Friday

Robotech_Master writes: Barnes & Noble has decided to imitate Amazon yet again, as it comes out with a $50 Android tablet just in time for the holidays. The specs are similar to slightly better than the $50 Fire, but the kicker is this tablet will ship with plain-vanilla Marshmallow Android 6.0 and the Google Play utilities--unlike the Fire, which limits its users to only those apps Amazon deems suitable to offer. Might this be enough to rescue the ailing Nook brand?

Submission + - Groundbreaking Paper on arXiv derives Gravity from Holographic Principle (arxiv.org)

vikingpower writes: Dutch prodigy and Amsterdam University Professor Erik Verlinde published a paper on arXiv, yesterday November 7, titled "Emergent Gravity and the Dark Universe". In the paper, Verlinde derives gravity from the so-called Holographic Principle, which — simply put — states that gravity emerges from the interplay between and entropy re-arrangement of sub-atomic "strings" that live in a negatively curved space-time. At that level, "...spacetime and gravity are emergent from an underlying microscopic description in which they have no a priori meaning" . Most importantly, Verlinde's paper has as a consequence that Dark Matter, nemesis of many an astronomer, is nothing more than an illusion. Verlinde, who was awarded the Dutch national Spinoza science prize in the recent past, already completed the tour de force of deriving Newtonian gravity from the same principles in a 2010 paper, also on arXiv. We are probably looking at Nobel-prize material here, as Verlinde is acknowledged by his peers to "go one better than Einstein's General Theory of Relativity".

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