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Submission + - White House says AI could hurt jobs (forbes.com)

bizwriter writes: The "Administration’s Report on the Future of Artificial Intelligence", out today from the White House, looks at AI, potential impacts for the future, and what the country should do. The thinnest section was on impacts on the economy, including jobs, and how income inequality could worsen as a result. There are few ideas of how to deal with the issue other than unnamed "policy interventions" and a call for additional study.

Submission + - A lot of influencer marketing is based on fraud (inc.com)

bizwriter writes: Social network influencers are all the range among marketers. Slip someone can cash and they'll talk about your product so you can reach all their followers. Except, in a lot of cases, most of those followers are fake, as are the comments and likes. Just ask Mr. Potato, who had 10,000 followers in two weeks for the cost of a burger and beer.

Submission + - Sharing economy workers don't see big payoffs (forbes.com)

bizwriter writes: Although Uber, TaskRabbit, and others hype the money workers can make, the reality falls far short according to studies. And that's before people have to come to grips with being small business owners who have to cover costs and keep up with tax payments.

Submission + - Wealthy Family Sues Apple for Alleged Racial Profiling (inc.com)

bizwriter writes: Few companies do PR better than Apple. But sometimes the giant makes a glaring mistake. Here's a recent example that should serve as a warning that you always, always, always pay attention to how customers think they're being treated. An example is if you have a wealthy mother and her daughter claim that they've been physical restrained and detained while on a shopping trip. Call it Buying While Black.

Submission + - Tech Site Gigaom Runs Out of Money, Shuts Down (inc.com) 1

bizwriter writes: Tech media site Gigaom suddenly announced that it had run out of money and was shutting down. Stunned staff, still reeling, too to Twitter to offer what little they knew. Creditors have taken possession of the assets.

Submission + - 5 white collar jobs robots already have taken (fortune.com)

bizwriter writes: University of Oxford researchers Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne estimated in 2013 that 47 percent of total U.S. jobs could be automated and taken over by computers by 2033. That now includes occupations once thought safe from automation, AI, and robotics. Such positions as journalists, lawyers, doctors, marketers, and financial analysts are already being invaded by our robot overlords.

Submission + - Toxic Chemicals Taint Many Halloween Costumes, Products (dailyfinance.com) 1

bizwriter writes: Getting ready for a night of trick or treating with the kids or grandkids? Better check that store-bought costume or bag, because it may be packed with toxic chemicals, according to a study out today by the nonprofit Ecology Center's HealthyStuff.org project.

Submission + - The Latest Climate Change Denial Fact Twisting (forbes.com)

bizwriter writes: A new report from libertarian think tank Heartland Institute claims that new government data debunks the concept of global climate change. However, an examination of the full data and some critical consideration shows that the organization, whether unintentionally or deliberately, has inaccurately characterized and misrepresented the information and what it shows.

Submission + - CEOs who make outragous pecentages of company revenues (dailyfinance.com)

bizwriter writes: Top earning Charif Souki of Cheniere Energy had a compensation package last year of almost $142 million, even as company revenue was $267 million with a loss of $554 million. His pay package was more than half company revenue. It turns out that hundreds of companies devote 1 percent or more — sometimes a lot more — of their revenue to pay their CEOs, including heads of such tech companies as Zynga, Splunk, TripAdvisor, Progress Software, and zulily.

Submission + - The 69 Words GM Employees Can Never Say (aol.com)

bizwriter writes: General Motors put together its take on a George Carlin list of words you can't say. Engineering employees were shown 69 words and phrases that were not to be used in emails, presentations, or memos. They include: defect, defective, safety, safety related, dangerous, bad, and critical. You know, words that the average person, in the context of the millions of cars that GM has recalled, might understand as indicative of underlying problems at the company. Oh, terribly sorry, "problem" was on the list as well.

Submission + - Facebook post engagement drops but monthly engagement up for companies (inc.com) 1

bizwriter writes: PR and ad agency Ogilvy reported that the audience reach for unpaid company posts on Facebook is dropping significantly. It led to marketers panicking that all their efforts to get liked on the social network would be worthless. But a new report counter-intuitively shows that even as per-post reach drops, total monthly reach can grow.

Submission + - Lawyer Loses It in Letter to Patent Office (cbsnews.com)

bizwriter writes: If innovation is fascinating and has enormous implications for business, reading patent applications themselves will make most people's eyes glaze over. But every now and then something quirky happens. Take this attorney who, angry over a patent examiner's rejection of his client's application, wondering if the examiner is drunk or just mentally slow.

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