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Comment Re:Yay for metered connections! (Score 1) 110

34GB is a -DOZEN- AAA games? What? Where?

Just on my machine alone:

Doom: 54.0 GB
Fallout 4: 25.3GB
Withcer 3: 50.04

What AAA games are -you- playing? It's not unheard of for Steam to chew through a couple hundred GB a month for me, and that's just for updates.

Comment Re:Turbulent air not good for shooting (Score 1) 182

(In reply to ALL the replies to me)

Let me clarify for the record: I do NOT believe it was a bullet. I was merely stating that no one would hear a bullet with the loudness of a rocket. As I said, those things are -loud-.

Also, I think the whole conspiracy thing is a bunch of BS. Rocket science is -hard-, very hard. And things go boom all the time. Suck it up, Princess.

Comment Re:Could be done by a single person in theory (Score 1) 182

Not saying this theory is true, but have you ever heard a rocket? Especially a space bound rocket?

Those things are -loud- -- Even when sitting on the pad and going through pre-flight checks -- or anything where they're throttling the engines.

A .50bmg round wound sound like a chirp against all that background noise.

Comment Re:Time to update firewalls. (Score 1) 87

I have yet to see a single one that can decrypt SSL. I tried. A lot.

The only way to 'decrypt' is to force your own cert, which must be trusted on the devices (WPAD or manually) before it can actually do it without a browser throwing a fit. Unfortunately, once you have a mobile device enter, they tend to throw all kinds of hissy fits.

If I am wrong in assuming there is not a router that can actually decrypt ssl, then please, inform me. Because I looked for ages and even attempted to figure it out on my own. SSL is NOT perfect, but it does have a decent chain of trust.

Comment Re:Intentional MITM / Reverse Proxy (Score 0) 87

I could not agree more on the point of treating all devices at hostile and, for the most part, I do.

I should note, since I didn't note it earlier - this is a home network, not a business, thankfully. All devices are mac-white list only. I do have a separate, highly restricted and segregated "friends" (Guest) network for hostiles that I cannot control. They also don't have all the protections of my main network.

A single point of failure, however, does make me think though. I did not consider that fact. Maybe it's time to rework a little of my little slice of heaven and see if I can add some better protections. FWIW, though; each device is accounted for on my network (non-guest) and all traffic (I don't "look" at traffic. Just have scripts and stuff to make sure it's not doing anything bad) is monitored. The 'firewall' portion, DPI and whatnot, works quite hard on all the packets, but for the most part, I've ran a clean network for many years. I just make sure to check the data at least once a day and fix / check out any irregularities. It's also helpful that there's approximately one windows machine in the network and it has a few more checks on it.

Comment Re:Intentional MITM / Reverse Proxy (Score 0) 87

Thankfully, my network is more complex than most home networks. All my devices are set to ONLY work on my network. Wireless devices route through vpn to my network.

Thank you for the reply, either way.

I would love a better way to have a cert, a signed and proper cert, for my network, but I think the only choice is Let's Encrypt or whatever it's called now. I still am kind of leery about them. Some times, something that looks too good to be true, truly is. I will await the verdict in a year or so to see how they actually do.

So this runs to a different question: Any way to obtain a cert, for my network only, to authenticate my hosts and clients (At any given time, my network has ~25 clients, depending on which systems I have running at the time and which phones are powered on) before going out on that damn internet? I really don't want to pay for a cert, especially if it's fallible (Symantec.) -- Are they are any truly trustworthy ones left? Or should we just byte the bullet, roll our own cert and keep vigilant on logs (what I'm doing now)?

Submission + - New Linux Trojan Is All-Around Threat: DDoS Tool, Bitcoin Miner, Web Ransomware (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A trojan that targeted Drupal sites on Linux servers last May that was incredibly simplistic and laughable in its attempt to install (and fail) web ransomware on compromised websites, has now received a major update and has become a top threat on the malware scene. That trojan, named Rex, has evolved in only three months into an all-around threat that can: (1) compromise servers and devices running platforms like Drupal, WordPress, Magento, Jetspeed, Exarid, AirOS; (2) install cryptocurrency mining in the background; (3) send spam; (4) use a complex P2P structure to manage its botnet; and (5) install a DDoS agent which crooks use to launch DDoS attacks.

Worse is that they use their DDoS capabilities to extort companies. The crooks send emails to server owners announcing them of 15-minute DDoS tests, as a forewarning of future attacks unless they pay a ransom. To scare victims, they pose as a known hacking group named Armada Collective. Other groups have used the same tactic, posing as Armada Collective, and extorting companies, according to CloudFlare.

Comment Re:Sorry, no exceptions to mathematics. (Score 1) 388

I like this.

You've encouraged me, and inspired me, to do something like this my self now. Thank you, sir.

Would you mind giving a little more detail of what kind of things you keep (or should keep) on the USB stick? And what encryption set up? Veracrypt would be nice but might be overkill.

I've never thought of this type of thing before and now that I am, I realize it's something I really need to do for my wife. Because I won't be here much longer.

Comment Re:Bad code is everywhere (Score 1) 162

You're fucking kidding me, right? Go away, Troll.

Just because there is a 'coding standard' does not mean it has good naming standards. I'm not -downing- C -- I've already stated several times that I -love- C and prefer it over anything else. I've been writing C applications since 1990. Both professionally ( as in, for PAY on major projects ) and on my own projects. I think I have earned a right to not be 'inexperienced.'

Comment Re:Bad code is everywhere (Score 1) 162

I hate to admit it, but a lot of "Linux Fans" lack common sense; they simply go where their friends/peers go. That whole hipster thing. Meh. I see things for their value, and their cons. I use windows AND linux, and I like both.

I am NOT a fan of Java. But I see it's worth quite well. It has its use. A tool for every job. I, personally, prefer C, but that's because I've always used C (it's what I started on all those years ago) and it's what i always come back to. It's like that abusive Ex that you just cannot quit, but the sex is good, so you stay.

C function names....I could write a book on that rant. Truly. C is horrid when it comes to standards, conventions, etc with naming. Hell, even with arguments. LibC itself is a pain for those who aren't intimately familiar with it.

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