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Comment That's just how the media works (Score 1) 269

He has a valid point, to some extent. On the other hand, that's just how the media works - it's also more likely to report deaths by plane crashes, or terrorism, or mass shootings, because that's what people want to read about. Also, those other things have a long history of causing only a small relative number of deaths, while autonomous vehicles are new, and deserve some higher level of scrutiny in the early years.

Submission + - Crash: how automation is setting us up for disaster (theguardian.com)

Esteanil writes: We increasingly let computers fly planes and carry out security checks. Driverless cars are next. But is our reliance on automation dangerously diminishing our skills?

When a sleepy Marc Dubois walked into the cockpit of his own aeroplane, he was confronted with a scene of confusion. The plane was shaking so violently that it was hard to read the instruments. An alarm was alternating between a chirruping trill and an automated voice: “STALL STALL STALL.” [...] “We completely lost control of the aeroplane, and we don’t understand anything! We tried everything!”

The crew were, in fact, in control of the aeroplane. One simple course of action could have ended the crisis they were facing, and they had not tried it. But David Robert was right on one count: he didn’t understand what was happening.

Submission + - SPAM: This high-tech card is being rolled out by French banks to eliminate fraud

schwit1 writes: Your credit card security is pretty broken. It's not your fault, it's just really hard to keep people's money safe, especially online.

Part of the problem is that once your card details are stolen — whether through a phishing attack or by someone copying the digits on the back — fraudsters are free to go on a spending spree until you notice something's up. Normally by the time you get around to actually cancelling your card, it's all too late.

But what if the numbers on your card changed every hour so that, even if a fraudster copied them, they'd quickly be out of date? That's exactly what two French banks are starting to do with their new high-tech ebank cards.

The three digits on the back of this card will change, every hour, for three years and after they change, the previous three digits are essentially worthless, and that's a huge blow for criminals.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - New formula massively reduces prime number memory requirements.

grcumb writes: Peruvian mathematician Harald Helfgott made his mark on the history of mathematics by solving Goldbach's Weak Conjecture, which every odd number greater than 5 can be expressed as the sum of three prime numbers. Now, according to Scientific American, he's found a better solution to the Sieve of Erasthones:

In order to determine with this sieve all primes between 1 and 100, for example, one has to write down the list of numbers in numerical order and start crossing them out in a certain order: first, the multiples of 2 (except the 2); then, the multiples of 3, except the 3; and so on, starting by the next number that had not been crossed out. The numbers that survive this procedure will be the primes. The method can be formulated as an algorithm.

But now, Helfgott has found a method to drastically reduce the amount of RAM required to run the algorithm:

Helfgott was able to modify the sieve of Eratosthenes to work with less physical memory space. In mathematical terms: instead of needing a space N, now it is enough to have the cube root of N.

So what will be the impact of this? Will we see cheaper, lower-power encryption devices? Or maybe quicker cracking times in brute force attacks?

Submission + - Firefox 49 Postponed One Week Due to Unexpected Bugs (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Mozilla has announced this week that it is delaying the release of Firefox 49 for one week to address two unexpected bugs. Firefox 49, which was set for release on Tuesday, September 13, will now launch the following Tuesday, on September 20.

Work on fixing the two issues is ongoing. The first is a problem with a slow browser script, which is also the most time-consuming issue since the Mozilla team needs around a week of telemetry data to evaluate the fix. This is also the primary reason they've delayed Firefox 49 in the first place. The second problem relates to loading Giphy GIF images on Twitter, which open in a new blank page instead of the Giphy URL. This issue was first detected in Firefox 49 Beta releases.

Firefox 49 is an important release in Mozilla's grand scheme of things when it comes to Firefox. This is the version when Mozilla will finish multi-process support rollout (a.k.a. e10s, or Electrolysis), and the version when Firefox launches the new WebExtensions API that replaces the old Add-ons API, making Firefox compatible with Chromium extensions.

Submission + - Robot Sews 1st Garment (theindustrylondon.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A startup is announcing that they have used a robot to sew a T-shirt, producing the world’s first robotically-sewn garment. Despite decades of work and millions of research dollars, robots still can’t reliably handle fabrics. Sewbo figured out how to temporarily stiffen materials, making it easy for industrial robots to assemble clothes. This milestone marks the start of significant changes for the global garment industry.

Comment Re:Nice as a default, not as a mandate (Score 1) 275

Oh, to make things worse, they didn't announce this until AFTER the free Windows 10 upgrade period is over. Users who kept Windows 7/8/8.1 specifically so they could manage updates individually are going to be calling "foul" over this.

It's still available from the assistive technologies page. You have to vouch that you use assistive technologies, but there's no proof required, and under the circumstances there's no reason to feel guilty (but using the magnifier for a few seconds once a year technically qualifies if that's a problem).

Comment SSA needs to improve password policy (Score 2) 37

There is an undocumented 20-character limit on password length. Any longer password meeting all stated requirements is rejected (repeating only the stated requirements, not the actual reason). Although since the password has to be changed every 180 days, that's probably not enough time to crack it, if all printable characters are used (one can use a strong random username to add security, though). I'd rather be allowed to use an arbitrarily long password and not have to change it at all.

Submission + - Secure Skype alternatives 1

An anonymous reader writes: I have a Windows 8.1 phone and mostly use it for Skype calls and chats. A bit of browsing every now and then, and checking public transportation schedules. Nothing fancy in other words.

What can I do to be able to securely chat and place audio/video calls? What do you think is the best device to buy and what apps to use on it?

Submission + - Is Cortana spying on us? 2

siamesevodka writes: I just got the anniversary update installed [windows 10] and noticed cortana is installed again.I seen it was active again and wondered why. So I remembered it was hard for me uninstall or shut off the last time. So I asked cortana how to uninstall it. It replied that the anniversary update made sure it was permanently installed. So does this thing spy on us now even if we don't use it? Is it a back door for the NSA to keep tabs on me? Is microsoft whoring me out with their "free" software ? Is there a way to still shut it completely off or is George Orwell right?

Submission + - Solar Impulse completes solar-powered flight around the world

MikeChino writes: After 558 hours of total flight time, a solar-powered airplane just finished a record-shattering trip around the world. The Solar Impulse landed in Abu Dhabi at 4:05 am this morning, completing the final leg of an adventure spanning 43,041 kilometers. Upon landing and exiting the cockpit, Piccard said: “This is not only a first in the history of aviation; it’s before all a first in the history of energy. I’m sure that within 10 years we’ll see electric airplanes transporting 50 passengers on short to medium haul flights."

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