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Comment Re:Not a SQLite problem (Score 1) 56

did not know that SQLite did not fully delete.

One way or the other, it is most unlikely the reason is some deliberate action by WhatsApp or evidence of its collaboration with police.

Interestingly, DBase and Clipper weren't deleting records in DBF-files either — only marking them as deleted... But, hey, every new generation of programmers thinks, those before them were mostly morons and never encountered the "unique" problems they are facing.

Comment Re:Since neither is getting elected (Score 1) 247

This is the tragedy - as long as the government doesn't go for the guns, the populace will never use their guns for their intended purpose. It sends a wonderful message to government that the guns will never be used against them as long as they don't try to take them. That means they can screw the country over as much as they want (short of taking guns), without threat of resistance. Yaaaaaay.

Comment Re:Current U.S. corporate tax equally fraudulent (Score 0, Interesting) 172

They also knew how to escape this theft (income and wealth taxation is theft). Nobody ever paid the insane marginal corporate taxes. Nobody paid the 94 or 96% corporate taxes, nobody paid 50% corporate taxes, etc. American Revolution was fought over a puny tax, what was it 3 or 4%? The modern tax... theft system is completely out of control compared to those times. What was the point of fighting against taxation without representation at 4% then just to become a slave today?

Comment So fire the school principals! (Score 1) 55

Instead of charging the lowest available price, "AT&T charged the school districts prices for telephone service that were magnitudes higher than many other customers in Florida," the FCC said.

If true, then the school principals and techies in the affected school-districts should be fired.

Whoever approved the bills for payments didn't do their job. They should've asked the question: why is my school billed at a higher rate, than I'm paying at home? But they didn't, because it is not their money and their captive "customers" have no other choice anyway... No wonder, the per-pupil costs of public schools quadrupled since 1960-ies — with no improvement in quality to show for it...

That said, $170K seems like small potatoes. It is the sort of money, AT&T may choose to pay (without admitting guilt) just to save money on lawyers. FCC may have a case, or they may be engaged in malicious prosecution — chances are good, we'll never know.

Comment Re:"Model rocket" eh (Score 1) 76

It just goes to show, depending on who builds it, something may be an enlightened amateur rocket or a dangerous enemy weapon.

- false. This rocket is long, but it only weighs 1200 pounds. V-2 weighed almost 27,600 pounds and it had a 1000kg warhead on it that could be delivered to a 300km distance from launch.

I don't think it's just the name here that makes the difference.

Comment VoIP phones (Score 1) 55

we now have just two left: AT&T and Verizon.

Not true at all — any Internet-service provider would do. I use two different ones, actually, with 4 different phone numbers. The total monthly cost is about $7 (of which the biggest single part is the "911 fee"). A single phone system handles all the complexity and can route incoming calls to different accounts to different extensions. A problem solved years ago.

My Internet is, incidentally, through Verizon's FiOS, but Comcast cables are going to our neighbors' house from the same pole, which delivers Verizon's fiber to ours. Should FiOS misbehave, I'll switch to Comcast in a jiffy... I wish there were even more options, but so far we are fine...

Comment Re:I think the most popular product... (Score 0) 354

shoes, hats, underwear,
shirts,
pants,
coats,
gloves,
bricks,
nails,
glasses of all types,
pens,
pencils,
keys,
lightbulbs,
hammers,
bolts and nuts and washers,
knives,
spoons,
cups,
plates,
lighters,
mirrors,
shelves,
coat hangers,
clothing pins,
needles ...
I can go on, but all of the things I mentioned beat iPhones by orders of magnitude.

Comment Makes sense... (Score 1) 109

enable police in the UAE to go after anyone who uses VPNs to access blocked services

That using a VPN to work-around the blocks is made illegal makes perfect sense. The blocks' existence is the real outrage here, not the fact, that it is illegal to evade them.

Comment Bestest ever of all time, ha? (Score 0) 354

Ok, so how about this:

Bread: >100 Trillion pieces for sure (over 8000 years of history of humans making bread)
Milk: > 100 Trillion glasses for sure (over 8000 years of history of humans using non human milk) ...
Shoes. I don't know, almost everybody has feet, almost everybody wears maybe 100 pairs of shoes in their lifetime.....

I mean iPhone is the *best selling product ever* is not even close.

Submission + - SPAM: UK judge calls for an "online court" without lawyers

mi writes: A senior judge has called for the establishment of an online court that does not have lawyers and can deal with claims of up to £25,000.

The proposal is the centrepiece of a package of reforms to the civil justice system, drawn up by Lord Justice Briggs, a Court of Appeal judge.

Just how exactly will this court ensure no one is, in fact, a trained professional on the Internet, where no one knows, who you really are, is not explained.

We discussed the idea last year. Apparently, it is still alive.

Link to Original Source

Comment Re:And you shouldn't be.... (Score 1) 254

Nope. You are referring to one extrapolation a journalist made, when they assumed all streets in the UK have as many cameras as a single inner-city street. This has led to the commonly-spread, factually-inaccurate, rarely-refuted meme of Britain being drenched in state-owned cameras. It's patently untrue. The vast majority of cameras are in private hands, watching their property for thieves and/or vandals, etc. They are also covered by EU data protection regulations (for now), which are squarely on the side of the data subject (the public in this case).

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