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Comment Re:Does it really violate net nuetrality? (Score 1) 74

Alright, if you don't care about billing and only how traffic is treated/shaped, how about you sign up for BiasNetISP. Where the BASIC plan is dirt cheap and affordable to all. But it restricts access to only a handful of websites: Facebook, Foxnews, Google, ESPN360, and the homepage of the church of the latter day saints. It also restricts any other Internet traffic other than web access. Shell out another $20/mo for Netflix traffic on their PREMIUM service. But hey! They pay lip-service to network neutrality and if you pay an extra $10K a year for ULTIMATE service, you get full unrestricted Internet access.

Long story short, traffic is restricted for some of their customers. That IS affecting how traffic is being treated in a very non-neutral "We get to decide where traffic goes" sort of way. Once the gatekeepers try and control what roads you use, they can abuse that power to squeeze money out of you.

You completed turned around my point. I don't want traffic shaped or blocked. But if someone is going to get unmetered access to a certain service, I don't really care.

You're falling for the "zero rating" marketing spin.

Imagine a health insurance plan where everybody pays $50, but fat people have to pay $10 extra.
Reaction: WTF?!!? That's not fair! You can't do that!!!

So they re-imagine the health insurance plan where everybody pays $60, but "health conscious" people can get a $10 discount.
Reaction: That's cool, sure wish I went to the gym more :eats more cheetos:

GP is saying these are the same damn thing, it's just that they have different marketing spins.
You are eating cheetos, saying that the second plan is just fine, because it doesn't affect you.

But their rates didn't change for AT&T and T-moble. So what's the problem?

Comment Re:Does it really violate net nuetrality? (Score 1) 74

Alright, if you don't care about billing and only how traffic is treated/shaped, how about you sign up for BiasNetISP. Where the BASIC plan is dirt cheap and affordable to all. But it restricts access to only a handful of websites: Facebook, Foxnews, Google, ESPN360, and the homepage of the church of the latter day saints. It also restricts any other Internet traffic other than web access. Shell out another $20/mo for Netflix traffic on their PREMIUM service. But hey! They pay lip-service to network neutrality and if you pay an extra $10K a year for ULTIMATE service, you get full unrestricted Internet access.

Long story short, traffic is restricted for some of their customers. That IS affecting how traffic is being treated in a very non-neutral "We get to decide where traffic goes" sort of way. Once the gatekeepers try and control what roads you use, they can abuse that power to squeeze money out of you.

You completed turned around my point. I don't want traffic shaped or blocked. But if someone is going to get unmetered access to a certain service, I don't really care.

For example, I'm a DirecTV customer on Verizon. I'm aware that if I was a AT&T customer that it would get me unlimited streaming of AT&T's services including DirecTV. That's fine. It makes me jealous as a Verizon customer, but it doesn't impede my ability or AT&T's customers the ability to choose whatever video streaming service they want to use. DirecTV, Netflix, Hulu, Amazon, etc will all still work and will not be throttled.

Comment Does it really violate net nuetrality? (Score 2) 74

I've always considered net neutrality to be more considered with how traffic is treated/shaped rather than how it is billed. I don't want service providers to change traffic priority that would benefit one content provider over another. But zero-rating, as far as I can tell, does not change traffic priority or speeds.

Comment Copper in the ground??? (Score 1) 303

It's doable, but I wouldn't. Electrical grounding issues can blow up your router and anything connected to it. I've seen it happen with distances as small as 30-40ft. I would bury fiber especially since cost doesn't seem to be a huge concern here. If that's not an option then I would just use some point-to-point wireless radios from your house to your office - like Ubiquiti or something similar.

Comment Re:So...free or less than 15%? (Score 5, Interesting) 97

I helped install and configure truck dispatching software in the late 90's / early 00's, and I am honestly surprised that profession still exists today. Lack of technology investment is the only answer I can come up with. There is nothing they did a decade ago that cannot be done by software.

They recommend the best routes for the drivers -> A large truck optimized version of Google maps could do this much better than any human
They keep track of fuel costs and other transportation costs to ensure each route is profitable -> Easily done by software
They know their driver's habits -> So would tracking software which would be far more objective
They look ahead for connecting loads -> Much better done by algorithms
They basically work 60-80 hours a week -> Algorithms work 168 hours a week
They negotiate load price -> As if Amazon couldn't do this in a more automated fashion. It's certainly in their core competency.

They have a friendly relationship with their drivers -> The one thing software would have trouble with, but virtually all communication could easily be moved to call centers.

I happen to be the IT Director for a transportation company. I can assure you that while they have lagged behind in the past, the industry is rapidly catching up.

Dynamic automated routing has been part of my company since 2005. Routes are selected by fuel contract price, tolls, hours of service, altitude, etc.
Fuel and fuel tax tracking has been automated for over a decade
Driver habits > Still tends to be manual due to drivers' needs that are constantly changing. Family home time, emergencies, vacations, etc.
load planning is pretty much fully optimized except for instances listed above.
Some loads can be automatically accepted or denied via EDI, but it depends on capacity and shipper requirements.
Our lane prices are set. We rarely negotiate on a load by load basis.

Driver relationships are crucial to keeping good drivers happy. Sure, there are lots of drivers (even in a driver shortage), but there is always a severe lack of *good* drivers. It's the most challenging part of the industry next to regulations. Call centers tend to piss off drivers. Some want to talk to the same dispatchers every day. Some only want to communicate via their mobilecomm device or smartphone app.

Modern transportation software like McLeod LoadMaster or TMW Suite is very advanced.

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