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Submission + - Portable Apps Are Now Available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

prisoninmate writes: Orbital-Apps.com announced the availability of their portable applications, in the ORB format, for the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system. Being the first time we introduce our readers to portable apps for Ubuntu, we would like to let them know how these apps actually work. First of all, the available apps are freely distributed via the Orbital-Apps.com website in the .orb compressed file format to save space on the USB thumb drive. They will automatically enter the "Portable/Persistent Mode" when they are run from the USB stick, which means that all settings will be stored on the thumb drive. Of course, this means that no installation is required, but you'll need to first download the ORB Launcher.

Submission + - Fake Hacker Found Guilty Following Gutsy Mitt Romney Extortion Scheme (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Michael Mancil Brown, 37, of Franklin, Tennessee, faces up to thirty years in prison, a fine up to $250,000, and orders of restitution to victims, because of a daring stunt he pulled off in 2012 that involved fake hacking, the PricewaterhouseCoopers consulting firm, and US presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

Back in 2012, Brown had the bright idea to write a letter alleging to have hacked PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) servers and stolen tax documents prior to 2010 for Mitt Romney and his wife, Ann. The "hacker" asked for $1 million in Bitcoin, and after publishing details about his fake hack online, he almost received it from a "third-party", but not before the FBI arrested him and then uncovered his lie.

Submission + - That Time I Got Publicly 'Hacked' (darkreading.com)

ancientribe writes: All it takes is one lapse in judgment: you can't help yourself, and you log into that unsecured WiFi to check your email, and boom, your credentials are compromised. A "cautionary tale" of how one cybersecurity editor who knew better, went there.

Submission + - ISS Completes 100,000th Orbit Of Earth (phys.org)

An anonymous reader writes: The International Space Station, the space laboratory that showcases cooperation between Russia and the United States, on Monday orbited Earth for the 100,000th time, Russian mission control said. Traveling at an altitude of about 250 miles (400 kilometers) and a speed of about 17,500 miles (28,000 kilometers) per hour, the space station circles the Earth once every 90 minutes. The ISS has now travelled 2.6 billion miles "or about the distance of 10 round trips to Mars," NASA said on the station's official Twitter feed. From two modules, it has grown to 15 modules, occupying a space the size of a football pitch and represents around $100 billion in investment. "Such a long lifespan of the ISS proves that mankind has the necessary technologies for constant presence in orbit, that we have the potential for further space exploration," said Matyushin.

Submission + - Highly-Conductive Shark Jelly Could Inspire New Tech (gizmag.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers from UC Santa Cruz, the University of Washington, and the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason found shark jelly to have the highest proton conductivity ever seen in a biological material. The jelly's conductivity begins to approach that of leading proton-conducting polymers. Tiny organs in the skin of sharks, skates and rays, called the ampullae of Lorenzini, are key to the ability. Scientists believe that the jelly is what has been able to allow these animals to detect weak electric fields produced by their prey, as the organs, which are visible as pores in the skin, are connected to electrosensory cells via long, jelly-filled canals. Marco Rolandi, a co-author on a paper detailing the findings in Science Advances, sees potential use for the "shark jelly" in the development of new or enhanced materials or even the creation of new sensor technology. "The observation of high proton conductivity in the jelly is very exciting," Rolandi said. "We hope that our findings may contribute to future studies of the electrosensing function of the ampullae of Lorenzini and the organ overall, which is itself rather exceptional."

Submission + - Raspberry Pi Zero Gains Camera Support, Keeps $5 Price (engadget.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Raspberry Pi Zero has received its first major hardware upgrade today: a camera connector. The new addition of a camera connector works well with the two new Sony imaging modules announced last month. The board will retain its $5 price, too. Eben Upton, Raspberry Pi founder, said in a blog post that "through dumb luck, the same fine-pitch FPC connector that we use on the Compute Module Development Kit just fits onto the right hand side of the board." The team was able to close the feature gap between the Zero and larger Pi boards by moving the surface components towards the left, and rotating the activity LEDs. The CSI connector on the Zero is 3.5mm smaller than the adapter on the Pi 3, so you will need to invest in a new cable if you've already invested in a camera module for an existing project.

Submission + - Senate Report On CIA Torture Is One Step Closer To Disappearing (yahoo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: According to Yahoo News, the CIA inspector general's office "mistakenly" destroyed its only copy of a mammoth Senate torture report at the same time lawyers for the Justice Department were assuring a federal judge that copies of the document were being preserved. Agency officials described the deletion of the document to Senate investigators as an "inadvertent" foul-up by the inspector general. "CIA inspector general officials deleted an uploaded computer file with the report and then accidentally destroyed a disk that also contained the document, filled with thousands of secret files about the CIA's use of 'enhanced' interrogation methods," reports Yahoo News. The Senate Intelligence Committee and Justice Department knew about the incident last summer, sources said. However, the destruction of a copy of the sensitive report was never made public, nor was it reported to the federal judge at the time who was overseeing a lawsuit seeking access to the still classified document under the Freedom of Information Act.

Submission + - known bug in latest windows 10 update render some PCs useless

jerome writes: Latest patch tuesday inflicted pain on some users : PC taking 20 minutes for booting, sluggish desktop (sluggish as in "3 minutes to open a menu"), and no way to restore proper behaviour. It turns out Microsoft knew this could happen but, unfortunately, the suggested fix does not work for some people.

Submission + - Iran Arrests Eight For 'Un-Islamic' Instagram Modeling (bbc.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Tehran cybercrimes court said the country has arrested eight people working for online modeling agencies deemed to be "un-Islamic." The women models were arrested for starring in photos on Instagram and elsewhere without wearing their headscarves, which has been required in public since 1979. A total of 170 people have been identified by investigators for being involved in online modeling, including 59 photographers and make-up artists, 58 models and 51 fashion salon managers and designers. The court's prosecutor Javad Babaei announced the the threats on TV, claiming modeling agencies accounted for about 20 percent of posts on Instagram from Iran and that they had been "making and spreading immoral and un-Islamic culture and promiscuity." He added, "We carried out this plan in 2013 with Facebook, and now Instagram is the focus."

Submission + - Here's why airport security takes so long (zdnet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: With the number of passengers vastly outweighing the number of TSA agents, the situation is only getting worse. It's so bad that the TSA is now warning travelers at some airports, like Chicago O'Hare and Midway, to show up at their departure airport up to three hours before their flight leaves — all because there aren't enough staff to man the security posts.

Submission + - Philadelphia Union Accused of Using Drones to Intimidate Enemies (heatst.com)

schwit1 writes: Hotel developer Mihir Wankawala clicked on the link a friend had sent him and watched in shock: Drone-shot video shows dozens of union protestors, the view rising to peer in the windows of the historic hotel property Wankawala was carefully refurbishing. The whole video, which the unions posted to YouTube, is ominously set to Rockwell’s “Somebody’s Watching Me.”

“I guess they were trying to show their power,” says Wankawala, who says he sought bids from union and non-union contractors and discovered that using solely organized labor would increase his costs by around 30 percent. “I’m the new kid on the block. This is my first project [in Philadelphia]. I think they were trying to send a message that you have to use union labor to get your project done.”

Such scare tactics are nothing new; for decades, Philadelphia’s construction unions have used violence, vandalism, harassment and intimidation to dominate the construction industry.

Submission + - A review of new features in FreeBSD 10.3 (distrowatch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: DistroWatch has a review of some of the more significant features which appeared in FreeBSD 10.3. The review covers Linux compatibility, managing jails with iocage and ZFS-powered boot environments.

"The release announcement for FreeBSD 10.3 mentioned several features and improvements which caught my attention. Specifically the availability of ZFS boot environments, 64-bit Linux compatibility and jail improvements were of interest to me. I was especially eager to try out FreeBSD's new jails technology using the iocage front-end. The iocage software has been presented as an improvement on (and replacement for) Warden, a friendly front-end for handling jail environments."

Submission + - The 2015 Nebula Awards

Dave Knott writes: The winners of the 2015 Nebula Awards (presented 2016) have been announced. The Nebulas are voted on by members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America and (along with the Hugos) are considered to be one of the two most prestigious awards in science fiction. This year's winners are:

Best Novel: Uprooted , Naomi Novik
Best Novella: Binti , Nnedi Okorafor
Best Novelette: “Our Lady of the Open Road,” Sarah Pinsker
Best Short Story: “Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers,” Alyssa Wong
Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation: Mad Max: Fury Road , Written by George Miller, Brendan McCarthy, Nick Lathouris
Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy: Updraft , Fran Wilde
Kate Wilhelm Solstice Award: Sir Terry Pratchett
Kevin O'Donnell Jr. Service Award: Lawrence M. Schoen
2016 Damon Knight Grand Master Award: C.J. Cherryh

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