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Comment Re:Take action (Score 2) 185

What were you smoking? Win2K Pro was a fucking GREAT OS, rock solid, no eye candy bullshit, it just did what a great OS should do which is STFU and get out of the way so you can run your programs. XP was Fisher Price trash for kiddies, XP X64 (which was really Win 2K3 Workstation, MSFT got wind of so many of us turning 2K3 into desktops they just decided to sell it) was a damn fine OS, 7 is still a kick ass OS, and 8/8.1 is a good OS IF and ONLY IF you strip out the crapstore and spyware garbage and slap on Classic Shell, otherwise its UI will irritate the hell out of you.

But one thing we can all agree on is this...Windows 10 is trash. That is all it is, its trash. It gives you NOTHING better than the previous OSes, even its touted "features" are nothing but datamining trojan horse shit, takes away your ability to keep busted updates (which appears to be damned near a weekly thing with that POS) from being installed, has fucking ADWARE baked into the damned thing, has made BSOD a common condition again which I thought had died with XP, there is honestly not a single positive I can say about that piece of garbage.

Comment Re:Fine them?!?! (Score 1) 156

Thanks, perhaps that was what they meant and I read too much into it.

In that case, I would completely agree, there needs to be a real deterrent to make it clear that this behaviour isn't acceptable, and it does need to be meaningful for rich people as well. Things like losing the right to drive and ultimately, if they continue to drive anyway, their freedom for some period of time, not just fining them 10% of this year's earnings or crushing their car.

Comment Re:I read the version with the photos (Score 1) 4

Yes, it was. I had the maid show me how to work the coffeemaker later. I'd have known if I'd bothered to read the coffee packet.

Some of the blur may have been because I was so shaky after hiking outside with all those books and falling down. That last photo is bad because there wasn't much light,

Comment Re:I read the version with the photos (Score 1) 4

The blurry pics are from Patty's new Samsung. I reduced resolution as well, because when I run out of hosting space at mcgrewbooks.com where the photos actually are (they won't fit in the mcgrew.info's 10 megs) it will cost a lot more. The Sith is cropped way down, he was across the room.

That first picture, the worldcon logo, came from Google. The covers to "Random Scribblings" are GIMPed photos I took with the same phone I took to Worldcon.

I would have probably made a fool of myself if I'd gone to the first Midamericon in 1969 in St. Louis, but I was seventeen.

Comment It's because drugs AREN'T fine. (Score 1) 1

Most of today's junkies are far different than they use to be, although old school junkies still exist. These days, the drug pushers are doctors and pharmaceutical companies who are handing out very potent, addictive drugs like candy. Once the oxycodone gets you, you discover that heroin bought on the street is a lot cheaper than what "Doctor Pusher" is pushing.

So your garden variety "would never take drugs" upstanding citizen winds up dead of a heroin overdose. Having a place like that might save some lives and get addiction treatment for some of them.

It's hard for people to be rational about drugs.

Comment Re:empty lives? (Score 1) 156

I've played plenty of games over the years that I have enjoyed greatly and wanted to play more. You know what I never found, though? I never found that I couldn't resist the urge to play them at the same time as I was in control of a heavy, fast-moving metal object in a crowded area full of vulnerable people.

Anyone who truly can't control that urge demonstrably has serious mental health issues that make them a danger to themselves and others, and they need to be taken into care and properly looked after for everyone's safety and preferably to help them recover.

But let's be honest, how many people really couldn't resist that urge and have genuine mental health problems, and how many could have controlled themselves just fine but simply didn't care and knowingly did something extremely dangerous without regard for the potentially tragic consequences?

Comment Fine them?!?! (Score 1) 156

Fine them and remove their licence? Seriously? They killed someone and it looks like they did it in a way that was entirely avoidable with no mitigating factors. This should be tried as whatever form of manslaughter/murder in the local laws represents causing death through gross negligence.

At a minimum, people like this should be locked up on public safety grounds, and should be prohibited indefinitely from controlling any vehicle if and when they are released until they can show that they are now safe and responsible.

Comment Re:Standard protocol (Score 2) 92

Considering that the entire selling point behind Signal is that it's supposed to be resistant to "an adversary like the NSA," I would think their ability to trivially associate a key with a real person would kind of turn that on its head.

Any global passive adversary can do traffic analysis on any communication network. Signal's message encryption should stand up against the NSA unless there are any vulnerabilities in the implementation that the NSA has found and not told anyone about or unless they have some magical decryption power that we don't know about (unlikely). Protection of metadata is much harder. If you connect to the Signal server and they can watch your network traffic and that of other Signal users, then they can infer who you are talking to. If they can send men with lawyers, guns, or money around to OWS then they can coerce them into recording when your client connects and from what IP, even without this.

In contrast, Tox uses a DHT, which makes some kinds of interception easier and others harder. There's no central repository mapping between Tox IDs and other identifiable information, but when you push anything to the DHT that's signed with your public key then it identifies your endpoint so a global passive adversary can use this to track you (Tox over Tor, in theory, protects you against this, but in practice there are so few people doing this that it's probably trivial to track).

No system is completely secure, but my personal thread model doesn't include the NSA taking an active interest in me - if they did that then there are probably a few hundred bugs in the operating systems and other programs that I use that they could exploit to compromise the endpoint, without bothering to attack the protocol. I'd like to be relatively secure against bulk data collection though - I don't want any intelligence or law enforcement agency to be able intercept communications unless at least one participant is actively under suspicion, because if you allow that you end up with something like Hoover's FBI or the Stazi..

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