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Comment Apple (Score 3, Insightful) 150

Apple's been boiling its frogs (sorry, I mean, customers) longer, and has moved from the ability to install any app you want, to the ability to install any app you want IF you set up preferences to allow it, to an inability to set up preferences to allow it, but if you try, a button appears (which you have to go into preferences to find) that may allow it (doesn't alway appear)...

They're one or two steps away from "app store only."

The frogs.... sorry, the customers... just one step from boiling now.

Interesting to see Microsoft begin to turn up the heat.

I guess pretty much everyone's a frog now.

Customer. I meant customer.

Comment Re:No surprise... (Score 1) 156

Intel appears to edge out in single core performance, but by less than 5-10% depending on processor and we still haven't seen single core performance of Ryzen 5 or 3.

Well so far AMD has intentionally only compared their own 8C chips with Intel's 8C desktop chips that have been clocked very conservatively, all the good chips go to the way more profitable server market and not against the far more price-similar quads. So the quad core i7-7700k is still king of the hill in single threaded with Ryzen 1800X trailing offering about 80% performance (2.02 vs 1.62) in Cinebench single threaded. Of course 8x80% is much more than 4x100% so if your applications use multithreading well Ryzen leaves the 7700k in the dust by a substantial margin. It will be interesting to see if they can bump frequency further on quads, it's a bit the Phenom x6 again with more cores at lower speeds. But a much better attempt at that.

Comment Re:Good grief (Score 2) 273

SLS is up to 2.5 times the LEO capacity of a Falcon Heavy, which SpaceX has never actually launched. SLS is in a different class.

The block 2 version that's at least a decade away, yes. The one they plan to launch late next year is in pretty much the same class (70 vs 54 tons), by the time the 130 ton version is ready SpaceX should have a Raptor-based competitor to match. Maybe not ITS-size, that's a bit megalomania (300 ton reusable, 550 ton expendable) but even a "Raptor 9" would give NASA a run for the money. But yeah... I want to see the Falcon Heavy fly now too, it's been pushed back quite a few times.

Comment Re:This won't fly. (Score 1) 226

The proposal is only a wipe. If this happened accidentally you can log back into icloud or your google account and resync. Crisis averted.

So to protect all your information, put it in the cloud. The NSA loves you.

How would they know the code?

Well what should happen when you type the wrong code over and over? Here it's company mandated that four wrong attempts = wipe. Somebody's figured out the hard way what happens when the kid gets hold of your phone, bye bye vacation photos (abroad, too expensive to cloud sync).

Comment Re:Maybe, but maybe not (Score 1) 280

Sure but my Uber account works in 20+ countries worldwide, I don't have to sign up for the local transit whatever. That's a huge plus. (...) As someone traveling in Hawaii, California, Texas, London and Hungary

...you might be in a niche market. Everything you said about billing sure but for most people most the time it's a very limited geographical area. You can search for "taxi <city>" and install the local app ten times waiting to get off the plane, not that airports lack taxi queues. And I usually pay by a credit card that's linked to the travel and expense system no matter what the currency is, it not only works for taxi rides it works for everything else. I'm not saying it's not nice to have... but in terms of make or break for Uber's business model I think it's totally irrelevant.

Comment Re:Too good to be true. (Score 1) 193

This seems to be an incredible invention that will be a game changer. Passive cooling on the order of what this article talks about would seem to be too good to be true. If it is true these guys should be filthy rich soon.

Well the article certainly lacks critical sense:

And because it can be made cheaply at high volumes, it could be used to passively cool buildings and electronics such as solar cells, which work more efficiently at lower temperatures.

Cool solar cells.... by blocking the sunlight *facepalm*. Also I'm thinking how big a deal is the "not blocked by the atmosphere" really, I mean it's not like heat reflected of a little building significantly changes the ambient temperature. And finally production cost is one thing, but how it works in real dust-covered conditions and if it can survive being exposed to the weather all year long is another matter. I don't think it's quite as revolutionary as the article might suggest.

Comment Not sticky: ethically obvious (Score 3) 244

That's a stickier problem in electronics because of drm and other various anti piracy measures. At what point does an antipiracy device become a hinderance to repair?

From the point where it is actually implemented, onwards.

Which is higher priority?

The rights of people who have done no wrong are (okay, should be) higher priority.

Ideally, create fair laws that describe the bounds of legitimate behavior. Punish people who break these laws. Don't do things to people who are not breaking the law that prevent them from doing legitimate things based on the idea that someone, somewhere, might break the law.

The problem with DRM (Digital Rights Management) as it is presently constituted, is that the only rights that are being managed are those of the publishers. The rights of the consumer are being roundly trampled. It's appalling, really.

Comment Broken business models? (Score 1) 244

A business model that needs laws to prop it up is broken.

Copyright and Rights Licensing

Upon which the GPL is based, as well as just about the entire entertainment industry. It's difficult to imagine a studio spending tens or hundreds of millions on a production based on the hope that no one would copy and distribute the resulting product without seeing to it that they were compensated.

Patents

Upon which the drug industry, chip industry, etc., is based.

While these mechanisms are clearly not optimum, they do seem to benefit society in general. Certainly they are strong supporting factors for progress in the fields that they act as rights bulwarks for.

I really don't see that business models based on associated laws are inherently broken. Would you care to elaborate on your position?

Comment Re:Not really a success for the AI (Score 1) 72

No, this is like a self-driving car that only works in GTA because it has a pipe into the hard data for locations of obstacles and other vehicles etc.

Wouldn't that still mean you've reduced an AI problem into a computer vision/identification problem? Like making a video recording of a chess board and saying if we could identify where the pieces are, we'd know what to play. I imagine the computer could look at the framebuffer and "derender" the picture back into game state a lot faster than a human, then feed that into the same algorithm. Would that really be meaningfully different?

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