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Comment Re:Public information? (Score 1) 81

a cop can stand there and listen to what you say, even record it if they want. It's a public place.

The difference is that it used to take some effort to track what one person was saying in those public places. With technology making it nearly free, we're all facing every public moment of our entire lives being stored forever in some law enforcement database.

I'm fine with the local police getting copies of business' surveillance tapes, interviewing people, and checking telco logs to piece together my actions, AFTER there has been some credible accusation that I've committed a felony. But doing it all day, every day, in minute detail, storing it forever, etc., is massively crossing a line into police-state territory.

Your argument is akin to peeping toms protesting their innocence because you don't have an expectation of privacy when absolutely anybody could have been standing on a ladder, with a high-powered scope, taking pictures through the crack between the curtains, so it's all your fault, not theirs.

Comment Re:'"We are looking into the matter" (Score 1) 114

I had to read this carefully before I realized that the US state of Georgia was complaining, rather than the country of Georgia.

The word "state" appears EIGHT times in the title and summary. You can read it quite carelessly, and it's still difficult to miss the context.

There's plenty of problems to complain about, here... This is not one of them.

Comment Re:"Feel forced?" (Score 1) 230

No one sat down and said they wantd to make taxis more expensive 'just because'. There are reasons for that extra cost that protect the public

There's certainly some of that, but all too much of it is rent-seeking, lack of modern technology, and hanging onto depreciated business models.

The insane price of NYC taxi medallions for example. Technology allowing drivers to rate passengers, therefore allowing expensive trouble passengers to be left without a lift. Technology allowing passengers to get prices and comparison shop rather than being locked-in to the rates of whichever taxi pulls up, and depending on the route they take. Better utilization by telling drivers where passengers are. Technology that forces passengers to pay without cab drivers needing to tackle cheats. etc.

I have no love for Uber / Lyft abusing their employees, skirting innumerable laws, and throwing money around to try and get themselves exemptions, but it's easy to make the case that the traditional taxi system was incredibly inefficient and rather corrupt, for no good reason.

Comment Sop fucking abusing the term AI (Score 1, Insightful) 94

Code + Data is NOT Artificial Intelligence no matter how many times you call it that.

The joke that passes for A.I., which really should be called Artificial Ignorance, in contradistinction to a.i. (actual intelligence), is nothing more then a glorified dynamic table lookup.

Comment Change how tickets are sold (Score 5, Interesting) 212

If the tickets are being sold for $60, but people are willing to pay $150, then why aren't they offered first for $150? I see the big problem being the middlemen sucking money out without adding value. Let the entertainers get that money.

If I were in charge of tickets for something like a pro sports team, the system I would use would be to put the tickets on sale at some ridiculous price, and announce that the price would drop 1% every four hours, or something like that. Then if you want the perfect seats and don't care that they're $1000, you can get your pick on the first day. Wait a few weeks, and they're $500. Wait until the day of the game, and anything left is $20. There's no need to set different prices on the better seats--they will sell earlier at a higher price.

A system like that would make scalping at a profit nearly impossible.

Comment Re:Depends on price (Score 1) 335

You missed the parts where:

* I get to pause the movie for food / bathroom / etc.
* I get to control the volume,; treble, AND bass.
* I get to turn on/off sub-titles
* I get to to adjust the PQ (Picture Quality) to my likes. Movie to dark? Just turn up the brightness.
* I get to avoid all the stupid annoying kids that won't STFU. 4 months ago a kid was snoring loudly next to me. WTF.
* I get to laugh as loud or as soft as I like and I don't to worry about disturbing someone.
* I get to to wear nothing, full clothes, or anything in between.
* I get to to drink as much, or as little, as I want.
* I get to avoid all the other idiots on the road
* I don't waste gas
* I don't pollute by driving a archaic gas vehicle

--
Region Locking is Price Fixing.

Comment Re:More likely medical practice, not evolution (Score 1) 273

There are reasons why that's a poor idea. E.g., wider hips pose mobility issues. The system really needs a thorough redesign so that birth doesn't need to fit through the pelvic girdle, but that's far beyond us. The current system was designed for creatures with horizontal body position and small head size. For that it works fine. As it is... it puts strong constraints on development.

Don't think that this is the only place where history impacts evolution, though. Spiders have to drink their dinner because their brain is in a circle around their esophagus (or whatever you call that part of a spider). This worked out fine originally, but spiders became successful, and started growing and getting smarter, so their brains got larger, and now they need a liquid diet. If they get any smarter they won't be able to eat at all.

And speaking of the esophagus, consider the human trachea. Ever have something "go down the wrong pipe"? That's because of a very old design decision that's now apparently impossible to evolve a solution for. The lungs share the plumbing with the gut in the neck and head. There are lots of other similar features calling for a re-factoring of the design, but evolution doesn't work that way. All the intermediates must we not only working, but competitive WRT the prior model. No intermediate regressions allowed. (Except, of course, at times like after a major extinction event, when the selection pressure temporarily becomes quite low.)

Comment Re:Banish cars from the city center (Score 1) 235

Allow service vehicles, public transportation, cabs and bicycles, and everyone will be happy.

Okay, sure. Just as soon as I figure out how to get my SUV registered as a "service vehicle"...

Don't even try to tell me it won't happen... There's widespread fraud just in handicapped placards, because parking a few feet away is too much hassle for some people. You think the ultra-wealthy will resign themselves to riding the bus with the peasants? Not a chance, they'll find any means to maintain their status, privilege and convenience.

Comment Re:You know what? (Score 1) 572

You are correct that it is already too late to prevent global warming. It's been happening to some degree since we started farming rice. OTOH, a mild global warming has been advantageous. Without it we'd be entering an ice age. The ramped-up-on-steroids global warming that we've been pushing since the start of the industrial revolution, however, is something else again. We don't know just how bad it's going to get, but I do know that the actual projections have had the higher ends trimmed to avoid political repercussions. (Were the lower ends also trimmed? If so I haven't heard so.) Some of the model results that were excluded actually DO have Antarctica melting, and not just around the edges. Well, that's a lot worse than the mean projections, but the mean projection is that its going to be more than the 2 degrees Celsius that people talk about, probably closer to 4 degrees. That's nearly 8 degrees Fahrenheit. And that's going to mean LOTS of ice melting, and lots of deserts where there used to be farmland. It means that Canada will probably become good farmland...if it can get enough water. Oh, yes. It also means that the temperatures are going to get so high that we can't rely on any of the current models, because wind and ocean currents will shift too much. So we can't be sure where it's going to be wet, where it's going to be dry, or how wet or how dry.

My personal expectation (I'm no specialist, and a bit of a pessimist) is that we'll see over a meter sea level rise before the end of the century. Please note that this is not more extreme than some of the models predict, as some of them talk about 10's of meters, though I'm not sure of the timeline for that. I'm sort of expecting the Tethy's sea to form again for the first time since the Jurassic, but it would be a pretty shallow sea, I'm guessing less than a meter deep in most places...but how deep, of course, depends on the actual rise in sea levels. Maybe some genetic engineer will recreate the pleasiasaur to swim in it.

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