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Comment Re:Shudder. (Score 1) 188

That's all fine and dandy until the day comes at MSFT stops maintaining the WSL subsystem and/or lets subtle incompatibilities creep in.

Bring it up with Microsoft? What do Windows app developers do when Wine doesn't run their application correctly?

How does it compare to offering a build linked against the Cygwin library?

Zero extra work and no need for a separate box or VM, and a Windows licence, to test the build.

Comment Re:Shudder. (Score 4, Insightful) 188

Sounds horrible to me. Why bother?

Not sure what MS' motivation is, but it's good news for a lot of scientific software developers. Small teams or single researchers rarely have enough time to even keep the main development going, never mind keeping up with multiple OS targets. With this everybody can simply focus on Linux, and tell Windows users to just run it under the Linux layer and stop asking about a native port.

Comment Re:So basically (Score 1) 119

This is why when strangers photograph me, I flip them the bird, not a peace sign. Then they don't get my fingerprint, since it is not facing them.

Most parts of your skin has distinctive, unique patterns. You can get a unique print from your elbow, wrist, knuckles, knees... And you tend to leave such marks around too, if less commonly than fingers.

Comment Re:Sigh. (Score 1) 119

Finger prints are fine for identification, not verification. They're your username, not your password. If you do use them like that they are not dangerous.

But of course nobody does; US, Japan and other countries all use fingerprints to verify the password identity for instance. And as a result they catch multiple people here in Japan every year that entered the country with fake fingerprints. And since they just catch people that happen to get arrested for some other reason, it probably means there's hundreds entering the country using other peoples' ID and fingerprints each year.

Comment Re:First rule of journalism. (Score 2) 240

The only real option, baring some fundamental breakthrough [...] is massively more and simpler cores

The problem with that approach is that most problems are not infinitely paralleliseable, and some important problems fundamentally do not parallelise at all. You rapidly hit diminishing returns for more cores, and that's before you consider that you need to go beyond a shared-memory architecture beyond a dozen cores or so.

The newest generation of supercomputers already have big problems finding jobs that actually use all the hardware, and for the next generation people have more or less thrown their hands in the air already and say that except for a few very specialized workloads, the machines will be shared systems, not used for single jobs at a time.

Comment Re:Better be ready to be beat up when layed off wo (Score 1) 541

It's time to start thinking about how a society which want a social safety net can incentivize people people to not have children they can't afford.

Because we have such a problem with criminal lawlessness and uncontrolled breeding among trust-fund kids?

You already have a segment of people with, effectively, no need to ever provide for themselves. They don't seem to be causing any more trouble overall than anybody else, and most of them seem to manage to find something worthwhile to do with their lives.

Comment Toyota already has it (Score 4, Insightful) 361

At least Toyota already has this in their hybrid vehicles. And in Japan you have a toggle to temporarily turn it off (for when you arrive home late, for instance, and want to minimise noise). The "whine" you hear from a Prius or Aqua at low speed is actually the speaker; with it turned off they're almost completely silent.

Comment Re:Because Windows Sucks (Score 5, Insightful) 269

The only reason Linux is perceived as more secure than other operating systems is because most hackers don't care enough to spend time working to crack it, so there are less attempts.

Linux is a major server OS (arguably the largest), very big in embedded systems, and completely dominant on smartphones. Hackers are spending very significant time working to find exploits.

Comment Re:Or stay on LTS (Score 1) 78

I'm using LTS for all my work machines. The last round I rarely felt I missed out on anything compared to my updated machine at home. I think it's perfectly reasonable to stay with LTS if you want. You can still update to newer versions of, say LibreOffice and similar applications using snaps if you need it.

Comment Re:Softare and wording problem (Score 1) 210

The first generation Xperia phones actually did something similar. They kept the battery at above 90%, by charging up to 100% then letting it fall to 90% again before recharging it again. Much better battery lifetime than keeping it at 100%.

But lots of people complained that Sony had a lousy battery charger system that couldn't even keep the battery topped up. So to avoid the bad press they changed it and kept it at 100% all the time, like the rest of the manufacturers.

Comment Re:Thanks to (Score 1) 369

Ars Technica allows 30 minutes, I believe, and it doesn't seem to be abused. People that reply will quote the bit they reply to so it's clear what they refer to anyway.

So how about 30 minutes editing window, and a quick, one-button-press to quote the parent post? Just to encourage people to include the original bits in their replies?

For added protection you could colour the edited text in dark purple, say, just to make it clear to people what has been edited?

Comment Re:Great (Score 1) 89

Well, yes and no. You're limited to 100Mbit/s, which is if course a lot slower than gigabit ethernet, But normally a scientific cluster (which is what I'm interested in) isn't really limited by bandwidth as much as by latency. Going through the USB subsystem for all packets is going to give you worse latency than dedicated hardware. But then, I also use a cheap switch that's probably not a speed demon for retransmitting packets either.

And the thing is, the Pi is a fairly slow computer. I suspect that as a ratio of computing speed to transmission delays, the Pi has as effective communication as a "real" cluster of server systems connected with high-end hardware. The CPU is even slower than the network if you will.

Comment Re:Great (Score 1) 89

Any particular reason not to just do it in software, e.g xenserver or virtualbox? Virtual networking is kind of messy, but it leaves less cables around :)

VMs would work well, I agree. But this way I also get real(ish) network latency and delays in the same way a full-size system does. And an actual tiny cluster on my desk is a lot more fun :)

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