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Comment Re:Better be ready to be beat up when layed off wo (Score 1) 535

It's time to start thinking about how a society which want a social safety net can incentivize people people to not have children they can't afford.

Because we have such a problem with criminal lawlessness and uncontrolled breeding among trust-fund kids?

You already have a segment of people with, effectively, no need to ever provide for themselves. They don't seem to be causing any more trouble overall than anybody else, and most of them seem to manage to find something worthwhile to do with their lives.

Comment Toyota already has it (Score 4, Insightful) 361

At least Toyota already has this in their hybrid vehicles. And in Japan you have a toggle to temporarily turn it off (for when you arrive home late, for instance, and want to minimise noise). The "whine" you hear from a Prius or Aqua at low speed is actually the speaker; with it turned off they're almost completely silent.

Comment Re:Because Windows Sucks (Score 5, Insightful) 269

The only reason Linux is perceived as more secure than other operating systems is because most hackers don't care enough to spend time working to crack it, so there are less attempts.

Linux is a major server OS (arguably the largest), very big in embedded systems, and completely dominant on smartphones. Hackers are spending very significant time working to find exploits.

Comment Re:Or stay on LTS (Score 1) 78

I'm using LTS for all my work machines. The last round I rarely felt I missed out on anything compared to my updated machine at home. I think it's perfectly reasonable to stay with LTS if you want. You can still update to newer versions of, say LibreOffice and similar applications using snaps if you need it.

Comment Re:Softare and wording problem (Score 1) 210

The first generation Xperia phones actually did something similar. They kept the battery at above 90%, by charging up to 100% then letting it fall to 90% again before recharging it again. Much better battery lifetime than keeping it at 100%.

But lots of people complained that Sony had a lousy battery charger system that couldn't even keep the battery topped up. So to avoid the bad press they changed it and kept it at 100% all the time, like the rest of the manufacturers.

Comment Re:Thanks to (Score 1) 369

Ars Technica allows 30 minutes, I believe, and it doesn't seem to be abused. People that reply will quote the bit they reply to so it's clear what they refer to anyway.

So how about 30 minutes editing window, and a quick, one-button-press to quote the parent post? Just to encourage people to include the original bits in their replies?

For added protection you could colour the edited text in dark purple, say, just to make it clear to people what has been edited?

Comment Re:Great (Score 1) 89

Well, yes and no. You're limited to 100Mbit/s, which is if course a lot slower than gigabit ethernet, But normally a scientific cluster (which is what I'm interested in) isn't really limited by bandwidth as much as by latency. Going through the USB subsystem for all packets is going to give you worse latency than dedicated hardware. But then, I also use a cheap switch that's probably not a speed demon for retransmitting packets either.

And the thing is, the Pi is a fairly slow computer. I suspect that as a ratio of computing speed to transmission delays, the Pi has as effective communication as a "real" cluster of server systems connected with high-end hardware. The CPU is even slower than the network if you will.

Comment Re:Great (Score 1) 89

Any particular reason not to just do it in software, e.g xenserver or virtualbox? Virtual networking is kind of messy, but it leaves less cables around :)

VMs would work well, I agree. But this way I also get real(ish) network latency and delays in the same way a full-size system does. And an actual tiny cluster on my desk is a lot more fun :)

Comment Re:Great (Score 1) 89

It's really easy to set up. Take a few Pi's, add a small switch (get one that takes 5V). Connect them up, and use a single larger power brick that can power all Pis and the switch. Either make some kind of enclosure, or - as I did - rack them up with spacers, drill holes in the switch lid and mount the rack of PI's to it.

One wrinkle is that you probably want to keep the switch only for the internal network. I use a USB-Ethernet dongle on the login node for external communication. it's just as fast as the on-board Ethernet in practice (it's internally treated as a USB device anyhow), and you can set up the login node to act as router and gateway to the other nodes.

Then you can install and play with whatever cluster-related software you like: Slurm, OpenMPI, Ansible, GNU Modules, XscalableMP, ZeroMQ and so on.

Comment Re:Great (Score 1) 89

It's fairly common in complex robotics to have a set of tiny MCUs like the AVR (that Arduino is based on) to control one or two joints, then a larger single-board computer to send commands to those units, and receive status updates about angles and speeds.

The Arduino and Raspberry Pi are well suited to those two roles.

Comment Great (Score 3, Interesting) 89

I just finished a small Raspberry Pi cluster, with two RPi 3 compute nodes and an Rpi 2 front-end node. Not because it has such great computational capabilities - it doesn't - but because it's a low-cost way to get a "training system" that I can abuse without messing up anything on the real cluster I also use.

These new Pi's would be even better; could have a single backplane that the nodes slot into. Ideally you'd be able to route both power and ethernet through the backplane as well, but I don't know how feasible that'd be.

Comment Re:I Know Where The 22,000 Went! (Score 1) 474

Why is it society's responsibility to teach you job skills?

Because long-term unemployment is a societal burden, not just an individual one? And it's a missed economic opportunity for society as well as the individual?

It is a shared responsibility because mismatches between worker skills and opportunities is a shared economic burden.

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