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Comment Re:Only a penny a page, duplex? (Score 1) 5

I'll be better able to figure it when the cartridge is empty. The savings come from not having to pay eight or ten bucks for copies that I'm proofreading.

They're already online as free e-books, HTML, and PDF, with printed copies available at a price.

Comment Cataracts and Suse (Score 1) 6

IIRC you're Canadian (if in the US you'll need insurance) and should be able to get CrystaLens implants for an extra $2,000. They cure nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and cataracts.

I ran Suse back in 2003 and liked it, but moved to Mandrake because my TV didn;t like it; I was using the TV as a monitor with an S-video cable. Still trying to find a distro that will run on an old Gateway laptop.

Comment Re:Lumen Database may be part of it (Score 1) 102

As for whether a site is tied closely enough to infringement to deserve demotion, the featured article doesn't give the complete algorithm, but it does take into account notices of claimed infringement: "the tech giants have committed to demote websites that have repeatedly been served with copyright infringement notices." I assume these are the same notices of claimed infringement that Google forwards to Lumen Database, particularly those pursuant to 17 USC 512.

That's what worries me. The ones who claim infringement are also those with a monetary reason to restrict others, including those who aren't really infringing but just close to it, and bad for their business.

Until and unless there are serious repercussions for incorrect takedown notices that impacts the one sending the notice as much, relative to their business, as the notice would impact the one hit by it, I see more problems than solutions.
If I made my livelihood on selling sheet music for my own songs, a handful of incorrect takedown notices that bumped me off Google would be devastating to my business, but would have no impact on RIAA/Stemra/ASCAP/Sony, nor the lawyers who work for them.

Comment Re:PKI? (Score 1) 26

Worse than that; in all likelihood.

While adoption has been patchy; the 'trusted computing'/TPM guys definitely have what it takes to deliver a cryptographically locked bootloader and a variety of other powerful-and-somewhat-creepy capabilities; so anyone who gets onboard with this will presumably move from shipping hardware with shitty firmware that doesn't get patches to shipping hardware with shitty firmware that doesn't get patches and cannot be fixed or replaced even if you have the requisite expertise with that platform. The sort of 'support' that bootloader locked android devices get now. Far too insecure to be remotely safe; far too secure for mere mortals to reflash the firmware with something else without a particularly elegant 'trustzone' compromise or hardware attacks.

I hardly mean to suggest that OpenWRT will save IoT or anything(IoT needs a lot more saving than is probably possible for anyone; and vendors are spitting out unsupported hardware far faster than 3rd parties and mainline kernel support can catch up); but if you think shoddy firmware is bad; it's hard to get excited about shoddy firmware that is effectively impossible to replace even for devices based on well supported hardware.

Comment Re:Anyone have a link to the price sheet? (Score 1) 102

The U.S. Constitution grants the power to define copyright infringement to Congress within the limits of the First Amendment. Congress has created statutory limits on copyright, some specific and others largely left up to the judicial branch.

But congress isn't going to decide on whether any web site is in violation or not.

Comment Re:I'm not surprised. (Score 1) 877

It's not appropriate for someone to send messages like this to a subordinate, period, the end. It creates a hostile work environment because they have to worry about whether they'll be penalized for saying no.

Repercussions for rejecting advances are already against the law. That's what needs to be enforced, not blocking the initial advance.

Comment Re:I'm not surprised. (Score 2) 877

FD: I would never be confused with a person who has movie-star good looks, but I've been hit on in the work place by coworkers, often subordinate employees.

That's how a good portion of relationships start.
If hitting on a coworker were illegal sexism, a good part of the slashdot audience wouldn't be here, because their parents never would have hooked up.

That said, respecting that someone is not interested should be as obvious as respecting that someone is interested. In either case, move on.

Comment Re:Why not blame the manufacturer? (Score 1) 260

Probably b'cos there is nothing that manufacturers can do about cosmic rays, which are beyond even gamma rays in the electromagnetic spectrum in terms of wavelength and frequency.

In addition to what others have pointed out, stop shrinking dies. The smaller a circuit is, the greater the risk that it will be impacted when hit by a neutron. Components from a decade or two ago are a heck of a lot more resilient against cosmic rays than today's components.

Sure, at lower speeds, but for a great many things you just need enough speed. Split out speed-requiring jobs on cutting-edge hardware, and run other critical services on more reliable hardware.

Comment Re:vGPU seems cool (Score 5, Informative) 90

My understanding is that it is more extensive: PCI(mostly 'e' these days) passthrough allows you to assign a physical device to a VM; but the device can't be shared: if a given piece of hardware is being passed through to one of the guests, none of the other guests or the host OS can use it.

This 'virtual GPU' stuff is supposed to make allocating GPU resources between VMs closer to how it is with CPU time or memory, where all the guests and the host can't exceed the capabilities of the machine they are running on; but they can all have access, with relatively modest overhead, to the same device.

I don't know if things work as pleasantly as desired yet; but in principle it should be a lot more convenient than full device passthrough. Especially in cases where you might be interested in the GPU for its computational capabilities, video transcoder, etc.

Comment Re:Why not blame the manufacturer? (Score 2) 260

If you think that finding a vendor that doesn't keep cutting battery life/SD card slots/headphone jacks/basic safeguards against electrical fire in order to make it thinner, cheaper, or both is hard; just try to find one that ensures sufficient borated polyethylene(with something else to sop up the resulting gamma rays) or other neutron shielding into their products.

There probably are some, making bits for nuclear reactors and industrial, scientific, and medical users of neutron sources; but it's a niche.

Comment Re:LibreOffice? (Score 5, Informative) 121

You can definitely embed Windows Metafile images in LibreOffice on Windows; but I'm not entirely sure if that is enough to make it vulnerable. WMF is dangerous because it is basically a package of GDI function calls, which might be good for efficiency or compactness; but has led to a number of creative and executable things being shoehorned in(as in this case; and repeatedly over the years).

However, there are several image handling libraries that can render or convert WMF images without access to GDI; so in those cases GDI bugs wouldn't be a problem(though you probably have other things to worry about).

This Libreoffice VCL documentation suggests that LibreOffice uses its own VCL WMF filters; but I sure wouldn't bet anything remotely important on that without testing it first; or knowing rather more about how LibreOffice is put together.

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