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Comment Re:And yet (Score 1) 406

However, taking ALL of the data into account ( from all sides ), you can start to get a clearer picture of what's really going on.

Argument to moderation. You are assuming both sides are equally trustworthy (or non-trustworthy) and are basically symmetrical in their levels of manipulation. For example, Group A might be withholding information. Group B might be providing false information. The truth, therefore, is not somewhere between partial and wrong information.

That kind of thinking is exactly what makes propaganda effective. Congratulations on being a stooge.

Comment Re:Well, there goes the 4th Amendment again... (Score 1) 204

I understand your position, but unless you have an outstanding warrant, and tried to hide the bag of cards under the seat when the officer came to your vehicle, you probably wouldn't really have a problem, now, would you? There would be no probable cause. Now, if they did want to confiscate them for 72 hours in order to obtain a warrant to scan them, and that was a huge inconvenience to you, then you can grant them permission to do it right away and not have that problem.

I understand the knee jerk reaction to resist police - I like the fourth amendment a lot, and think it's abused at other levels of government, not just by the police, but without getting into that discussion, while I don't like the thought have having to prove your innocence instead of the government proving your guilt, you would have your two options: wait the (possibly) 72 hours for the warrant, or acquiesce to request. At some point you're not proving anything except that you can be belligerent and waste everybody's time and tax payer dollars. If, on the other hand, time wasn't an issue, and you want to make your point, you're free to make them do the legwork. Sorry - sometimes life is inconvenient. You don't like getting hassled by the police, but I'm sure you like when they catch bad people.

Comment Re:Well, there goes the 4th Amendment again... (Score 1) 204

The problem here is one of the Chicken and the Egg. How do you know the cards are counterfeit without first searching them? How do you search them without first knowing they are counterfeit?

You search them because it's not only out of the ordinary (which isn't illegal, of course), but ALSO because the passenger had an outstanding warrant. Combine the two, and you clearly have probable cause.

Comment Re:Well, there goes the 4th Amendment again... (Score 1) 204

And a lawful gun owner having a single gun in the car vs. a trunk full of weapons are entirely two different things. Amount certainly matters, and amount certainly raises suspicions - and especially when combined with an outstanding warrant = probable cause. It's really quite simple.

Comment Re:Well, there goes the 4th Amendment again... (Score 1) 204

Because of probably cause because of an outstanding warrant. Additionally, you can't say it's OK for one or two cards, just not all of them - then it become arbitrary and capricious. There is a disconnect between the letter of the law and the intent of the law, and in this case if there was no probably cause, there should be NO cards scanned. However, there WAS probably cause, so there's really not much to discuss, here.

Comment Re:Well, there goes the 4th Amendment again... (Score 1) 204

There's a reason there's a notion of probable cause; if you're talking about you and me (assuming you don't have an outstanding warrant), then you're argument is mine, we agree completely. But this case was not throwing out the fourth amendment - the passenger in the car had a warrant, and the driver handed the bag to the officers instead of saying "no."

Comment Re:That's definitely not accurate... (Score 0) 401

Yet more advocacy for government intervention? I work in the U.S. and enjoy 28 paid days off per year. That's well over a month when you count weekends, and doesn't count holidays. Some of the people where I work (television) have 24/7 schedules - meaning they don't get holidays (because we're still broadcasting), so they get like 35 PTO days. No government intervention required. Competition is good - both for employees and the company.

At the same time, some small start up isn't going to have the resources to give people that much time off; they need the opportunity to grow into a larger company that can. What that typically means for employees is they get to be in on the ground floor of an emerging company, and if it works then they will be the executives of the larger company in the future - for that possibility they are trading benefits for those ground floor opportunities. The free-er the free market is, the better it has been for employees and consumers - the only government intervention required is to keep it free (fighting price fixing and collusion). As Milton Friedman put it - no other system yet tried has ever done more for the common man than the free market. It's not perfect - but nothing else has ever had the track record of raising the levels of the average person than free market capitalism.

Comment Re:Ellen Pao (Score 1) 611

For the vast majority of supporters, a vote for Trump is not a vote for sexism or racism

Of course, it isn't, but that's because they can't reconcile the idea that they're good people and still voting for an evil monster.

Right... the exact same thing Hillary voters are doing. Your confirmation bias is showing.

Comment Re: "Gay Culture" is blind devotion then? (Score 1) 611

Of course - whether or not you realize it. You see the way they're dressed, the way they wear their hair, you notice their demeanor and attitudes towards others. White or black or Asian or otherwise, you notice that someone's wearing their pants around their asses and sporting a gold "grill," you notice the burka or yamulcha or skull cap, the people they're with and what they are doing, their tattoos and piercings, and you're judging them the whole time. Not just negative judgements, but positive and neutral judgements - you're assessing what you see, and that's just human nature (and it's good human nature, even if it's wrong every once in a while). White or black or Asian or otherwise, you think differently about someone with their pants around their asses and someone wearing a nice suit or dress. And it's not just OK to judge people that way, it's right to judge people that way, because these are the things that they have control over, unlike their race. And judging isn't "wrong," either, you judge everything every day, because you can have positive reactions, too - and would you call them wrong, also?

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