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Comment Re:I'll keep saying it - Global Free Press Foundat (Score 1) 330

The greatest benefit Bill Gates or Warren Buffet could leave to human kind is to use most of their money to fund a global free press foundation.

Yeah, with Democrat cronyist leftists like Gates and Buffet funding it there's no way it would have an ideological bias.

Comment Re:Umm (Score 1) 330

Yes every President lies at some point. But few lie about things so easily disproved.

Right. Like "If you like your health plan, you can keep your health plan." Or, "It wasn't a preplanned terrorist attack - it was a demonstration against an internet video that got out of hand spontaneously." I could go on and on, but you get the point. Thanks to that stupid crap, we ended up with Trump.

Comment Re:Hmm (Score 1) 375

I'd be enormously surprised if Chinese businessmen working in manufacturing industries dependent upon American and European clients aren't interested in news relating to how easy it'll be to export to the US and to European nations in the near future. I would, absolutely, expect them to show more interest than they've done in the past given the ramifications for Trump, who appears to oppose the degree of international trade we have, and Brexit, which will change the relationship of nations and thus have massive ramifications for trade.

Just because the "average" Chinese person doesn't care, doesn't mean that a significant minority will suddenly have a lot more interest in US and European events than they did previously. With China being a fairly populous country, you'd expect that to amount to a lot of new readers.

Comment Re:Hard to read (Score 4, Insightful) 375

You mean they should stop reporting on the President of the United States when he does something with serious consequences if whatever he did happens to be a bad thing?

That's... not the way the press is supposed to act in a free society, FWIW. The Press is supposed to cover what the government does and what the impact of that is. You might not like that, but the rest of us prefer it that way.

Comment Re:Kowtowing (Score 3, Insightful) 375

People have been claiming newspapers are obsolete in some shape or form for 50 years, ever since television became everyone's primary method for keeping up with the news. In practice, newspapers, while hit, never went away, while TV news has become supplanted by the Internet.

And who is dominating news on the Internet? Oh, yeah, the newspapers. Most of us have at least one newspaper's website that's on our rotation of sites to check every day, despite the attempts to get us to use news apps or search engine news aggregators - both of which suffer in that they mix the latest from, say, the Daily Mail, with that of The Guardian or Washington Post.

As for this:

Few people spend the time to read the entire article when they are looking for headlines and sound bites

Few do, But few have ever done. You think, if you teleported back to a New York Subway car in the 1940s, every strap hanger was reading the New York Times on the way to work? Go to a London Underground Tube Train in the 1950s, and every passenger was reading The Times, Guardian, or Telegraph?

There's always been a range of newspapers providing news in different formats for different readers, and the most popular have always been the ones screaming headlines that today we'd call "clickbait", and whose articles are scarcely a few sentences long.

The New York Times is an exception, because it caters for the market of people who want more. It's always been a small minority that reads it. The difference between the days of paper and today are that all of a sudden the NYT can have an engaged audience that spreads far beyond the range a printed, time critical, newspaper can be delivered within, and that without page limits, its no longer limited to coverage of the region it serves.

Which is why the New York Times is doing very well right now, when 20 years ago it wasn't.

Comment Re:Sounds like old news... (Score 2) 128

Because those features are required if you're going to implement full applications in the browser, as, for example, Google Docs (and Office 365 Online) are classic examples. They don't implement them for marketers, they're implemented because developers are trying to do advanced things in HTML and Javascript.

And while I know many on Slashdot would prefer applications not be built with web technologies, that's the way the world's going right now, for better or worse. Increasingly users are expecting the applications they use to be delivered over the web, accessible from any standards compliant web browser.

And it'll probably continue that way until or unless the concept of web pages and online apps gets separated, but that would require a good understanding of the needs of the former, and an agreement by vendors on an API (like Android's) for the latter, and that's not going to happen soon.

Comment Re:ECC (Score 1) 260

No boot ROM means that a hardware device constructed from discrete logic and analog chips directly demodulates digital data from the radio, addresses the memory, and writes the data. Once this process is completed, it de-asserts the RESET line of the CPU and the CPU starts executing from an address in memory. Really no ROM!

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