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Comment Re:Pokemon Go to rake in nearly $13 Billion (Score 1) 78

Actually, you can earn multiples of 10 pokecoins per day. Every 21 hours, you can get 10 coins for every gym you control at the end of the 21-hour countdown timer. I've never managed to have more than 2 or 3 at a time when that happened, but I expect when I get some more powerful critters I'll be able to do better.

Submission + - EFF lawsuit seeks to overturn DMCA ban on breaking DRM

Robotech_Master writes: The EFF has just filed suit against the US government on the grounds that the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s anti-circumvention provision, Section 1201, represents an unconstitutional restraint on free speech.

The suit takes aim at the practice of outlawing breaking DRM, with the Librarian of Congress permitted to make exceptions to the prohibition every three years, as well as outlawing any explanation of how to break DRM. The EFF calls this “an unconstitutional speech-licensing regime.”

This isn't the first time the DMCA's anti-circumvention provision has been called in to question. Earlier this year, Congress asked for public comments on ways to improve the anti-circumvention process.

Submission + - Whoever feels like innovating e-books, please raise your hand!

Robotech_Master writes: I keep seeing complaint after complaint that e-books are stuck in a rut, and nobody is interested in 'innovating.' Amazon tends to get the lion's share of blame for this, as they're the incumbent in the e-book market, but what's keeping its competitors from trying as well? A good innovation could be a competitive advantage against Amazon, after all.

It seems to me that we're not seeing any innovation because most consumers are perfectly happy with their ten-year-old Kindle e-book tech, and Amazon's competitors have effectively already thrown in the e-book towel. Anyone who tries to come up with something new runs into the roadblock that consumers don't want something new if it's not compatible with the e-reading tech they already have.

And yet, we still see all these people crying out for innovation, but no one actually making a move to innovate. Well, here's the bell, there's the cat; knock yourself out.

Comment It just wouldn't work out (Score 1) 380

The problem as I see it is two-fold: first, the sudden presence of about a zillion just-as-good-as-the-original digital media files up for resale would collapse the market and put publishers out of business.

Second, and more importantly, there's no way to prevent people from cracking the DRM on their e-books and backing them up before selling the DRM-locked original. You can crack the DRM on library books now just as easily as you can the ones you buy from Amazon. I don't see that changing.

Submission + - SPAM: Amazon adds SD card e-book storage, automatic video downloads to Fire tablets

Robotech_Master writes: Amazon has added a couple of interesting new capabilities in its latest Fire tablet firmware. The $50 Fire tablet will now automatically store e-books on SD cards, when available, and will also automatically download Prime Video movies to have on hand in case you can't access Wi-Fi for a while.

Comment Re:no sympathy for suckers (Score 3, Insightful) 81

Unfortunately, the only way to get this content is either to pay for it legitimately and then have to illegally crack it, or to pirate it which is illegal from the outset. If you want the content, you have to make a deal with some kind of devil.At least if you do buy it, the people who originally made it get paid something.

Submission + - After software upgrade, Kobo customers are losing books from their libraries (teleread.com) 2

Robotech_Master writes: After a recent Kobo software upgrade, a number of Kobo customers have reported losing e-books from their libraries--notably, e-books that had been transferred to Kobo from their Sony Reader libraries when Sony left the consumer e-book business. One customer reported missing 460 e-books, and the only way to get them back in her library would be to search and re-add them one at a time! Customers who downloaded their e-books and illegally broke the DRM don't have this problem, of course.

Submission + - Harvard Bookstore launches Print + Digital bundle for Chris Anderson's new book (teleread.com)

Peter Hudson writes: Teleread, Publishers Weekly, Digital Book World, and Publishing Perspectives are reporting that the Harvard Bookstore is launching a program in partnership with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Shelfie where customers who purchase certain HMH books will get the ebook included free or at a substantially reduced price (Teleread reports that the majority of the bundled digital editions will be free or 99 cents). From Publishing Perspectives:

The new program is applicable only to certain New York Times bestselling titles including TED Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking by Chris Anderson (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, releasing today); Life of Pi by Yann Martel (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2002); Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2000); and How to Cook Everything The Basics: All You Need to Make Great Food by Mark Bittman (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012).


Comment Write-up is exactly right. It's a good thing. (Score 5, Interesting) 197

I said much the same thing on TeleRead. There are many, many devices and things that haven't "advanced" in decades but are a such a quiet everyday part of our lives that we couldn't imagine doing without them. Smartphones (and their close relations tablets and e-readers) are becoming just like that. Not everything in our lives has to be replaced by something shiny and new every couple of years.

Comment Re:Android 4? Really? (Score 1) 195

It's going to be open-source, and letting people who buy it upgrade to a later version of Android is explicitly given as a reason for that on the Indiegogo page.

In any event, for the kinds of simple e-reading tasks the device is meant for, 4.0.4 should still run pretty much any e-reading app on the market. With only 4 GB of internal storage and a slow-updating e-ink screen, it's not really meant to be a media tablet.

Submission + - $699 may be the right starting price for a 13.3-inch Android e-ink reader

Robotech_Master writes: GoodEReader editor Michael Kozlowski is running an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign to sell a $699 13.3" Android e-ink tablet. The campaign seeks $42,000--enough to fund the 60-device minimum order set by the OEM. But is it really a good deal for that much money? As an early-adopter or business-class device, it very well might be.

Submission + - How Barnes & Noble stole the first e-book I ever bought

Robotech_Master writes: I bought my first e-book in 1998, before my e-reading hardware had even arrived yet. Yesterday I discovered that Barnes & Noble has effectively stolen that book from me, mistakenly replacing it in my Nook library with another title I never bought.

B&N's customer service rep's most helpful suggestion was that I could buy the e-book again—he even offered to give me the link. Is it any wonder Barnes & Noble is having such a hard time competing with Amazon?

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