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Comment Re:The problem is depth perception (Score 1) 49

Your eyes are far better at matching light frequencies between both eyes to get the depth mapping correct. Your standard camera can only distinguish 24 bits of light frequency. At that level you get somewhat of a depth map but not a very good one.

Waymo uses LIDAR, not visual light cameras. It gets an extremely accurate depth map, far more accurate than any human could, because LIDAR measures the time it takes light to reach the "seen" object and bounce back to the receptor.

In a 3D mapped world, all the depth information is 100% accurate.

Which is only slightly better than LIDAR-derived depth information.

Comment Re: The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 302

If you look in the FEMA site, they say that they provide gramts to perform repairs not covered by insurance. And no, they don't do a needs test. Now, the typical rich person does not let their insurance lapse just so that they can get a FEMA grant. Because such a grant is no sure thing. They also point out that SBA loans are the main source of assistance following a disaster. You get a break on interest, but you have to pay them back.

Comment Re: I think I speak for all of us here (Score 1) 73

So, not for moral reasons at all

RTFS:

they saw hacking as a "moral crusade", said Paul Hoare, senior manager at the NCA's cybercrime unit, who led the research. Others were motivated by a desire to tackle technical problems and prove themselves to friends

I realize that reading the article is too much to ask, but reading the summary really isn't.

Comment I think I speak for all of us here (Score 1) 73

I think I speak for all of us here when I say: Duh?

I mean, I'm glad they've realized this, but rather disappointed they didn't figure it out, oh, 30 years ago, back when kids were hacking the phone system. I mean, even back then some of them "stole" quite a bit of value in the form of hours-long international telephone calls (which used to be really expensive, not like now), but clearly the monetary value was irrelevant, except perhaps as a way to keep score.

Some of those kids grow up and turn their skills to deliberate crime for profit, sure. But I think it's always been clear that basically none of them start that way. Honestly, I don't think it's even possible. There has to be an overpowering love of and fascination with the technology at the beginning, that almost certainly overshadows any interest in material gain. Later, the glamor of the tech fades a bit, but that takes years.

Comment Re:Yeah, Climate Change isn't real /sarcasm (Score 1) 302

And the Republicans insist climate change isn't real . . . well maybe when half the red leaning states are under water they'll open their eyes. Probably be way too late by that point though.

I wouldn't count on that. A lot of red-leaning states are inland, while the coasts are 2/3 blue.

Comment Re: The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 302

I understand your point about view land being desirable even though it's a flood risk. I live a mile or so from the Hayward fault. But I have California's risk pool earthquake insurance. The government wouldn't be paying me except from a fund that I've already paid into. I imagine that the government does pay some rich people in similar situations, but as far as I'm aware disaster funds go to the States from the federal government and should not in general become a form of rich people's welfare. Maybe you can find some direct evidence to show me that would make the situation more clear.

Comment Re:The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 302

What you are observing is economics. As a city or town population grows, the best land becomes unavailable and those who arrive later or have less funds available must settle for less desirable land. Thus many cities have been extended using landfill which liquifies as the San Francisco Marina District did in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, or floods. Risks may not be disclosed by developers, or may be discounted by authorities as the risks of global warming are today.

Efforts to protect people who might otherwise buy such land or to mitigate the risks are often labeled as government over-reach or nanny state.

Comment Re:One day they'll discover the folly.... (Score 1) 84

If it is used as a password (IE: no other authenticating properties), it's a password.

Only if you conflate all authentication with password authentication.

In short, if someone obtains that representation and is able to utilize it, the user is toast

That statement is correct, but note that it contains two parts: (a) if someone is able to obtain the representation and (b) if someone is able to utilize it. This, in a nutshell is the difference between password and biometric authentication. With passwords, the hard part is (a), and (b) is easy. With biometrics, the hard part is (b), and (a) is easy. Exactly how hard (b) is depends on the details of the system.

Comment Re:The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 302

Oh, of course they were caused by misguided engineering efforts. Everything from the Army Corps of Engineers to Smoky Bear goes under that heading. The most basic problem is the fact that we locate cities next to resources and transportation, which means water, without realizing where the 400-year flood plane is. Etc. We have learned something since then.

Our problem, today, is fixing these things. Which is blocked by folks who don't believe in anthropogenic climate change, or even cause and effect at all. They don't, for the most part, register Democratic.

Comment The problem with your explanation (Score 5, Insightful) 302

The problem with your explanation is that it's fact-based, and stands on good science. This is the post-truth era. Thus, the counter to your argument will be:

  • Evidence for a human cause of erosion is thin and controversial, and is being pushed by loony liberals.
  • We need those oil and shipping jobs, and jobs building and maintaining levees, not more regulation that stifles them!
  • Cause and effect is not a real thing, except for one cause, God is behind everything.
  • This is part of God's plan for us. The end time is coming, and when the Rapture arrives it will not matter that Louisiana's coast has eroded. Cease your pursuit of unholy science and pray to save your soul!

Comment Re:One day they'll discover the folly.... (Score 1) 84

It looks like you don't understand yourself. Otherwise you would not claim that biometric authentication is not comparable to password authentication, and then conclude it is better than PIN authentication.

You need to re-read the post you responded to. Nowhere did I say that biometric authentication cannot be compared to password authentication. I said a biometric is not a password. The security models are different, but that does not mean they cannot be compared. Also, I did not say that biometric authentication is unambiguously better than PIN authentication. I said it's better in some ways and not as good in others, and overall, for this application, this threat models, it's "on par". That means "about as good".

Comment Re:So... (Score 1) 323

so far hasn't done anything irreversible.

I think the first victims have been farmers who can't bring in their crops. Just the people who voted for him in California's central valley and wherever else we depend on guest workers. I don't see citizens lining up to pick those crops. The small family farmers, what's left of them, will feel this worse, the large corporate ones have the lawyers necessary to help them break the rules and truck people in from South of the border.

The second group of victims will be the ones who need health care that doesn't come from a big company. It's a lot more difficult to start a small business when there is no affordable way to get health care. And that is the case for my own small business - I'd be in bad shape if my wife left the University. I think that's the real goal - to keep people from leaving employment in larger companies and going off on their own.

Comment Re:One day they'll discover the folly.... (Score 1) 84

Don't trust any organization that doesn't understand that the fingerprint is the user name not the password.

Fingerprints are not passwords, but they're even worse usernames. Fingerprints come with no uniqueness guarantees and don't consistently identify the same person. Fingerprints are useful authenticators, but you have to understand the security model of biometric authentication, and it is not the same as password authentication. You can't just slot biometrics in as either usernames or passwords. They're different, with different strengths and weaknesses.

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