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Comment Re:Android? (Score 2) 63

That is the GUI. A launcher completely replaces your homescreen and apps drawer, which is just an app. The default launcher has no special privlidges or permissions over a third party, so implementing it there is no more technically valuable than doing so in a 3rd party. So find a 3rd party you like and use it instead. That's one of the benefits of Android- swap out the parts you don't like.

Comment Re:This Means Very Little. (Score 1) 179

The fact that the app shames you into force ride tipping means they care less about the customers. I paid for a service, unless you went above and beyond I shouldn't have to deal with begging for more afterwards. If you do something exceptional, like carry my groceries in, I'll tip you in cash. Otherwise I don't want to be asked. Not having a tip is my main reason for using uber over cabs.

Comment Re:MozColonSlashSlashA is at it again! (Score 2) 82

No, it isn't. Or at least it shouldn't be. When their entire goal was to make a browser, they did good work. Everything since then has watered down their effort and caused them to lose focus on the one thing they absolutely needed to have win in order to achieve their goals. They should be completely shut down other than Seamonkey/Firefox.

Comment Re:Effective solution (Score 1) 142

I know the government wants to make coding the next blue collar job but it takes a lot of knowledge and practice to perfect the craft.

In the decades I've worked as a software developer, I've almost never had a boss who cared at all for "perfect". OTOH, I can think of many times when I was explicitly ordered to not implement something correctly. Normally, their only concern is getting deliveries to customers, which involves satisfying sales people and customer people who usually have no clue at all about software quality, and are primarily concerned with money issues.

Granted, I have had a few cases where, years after my job was terminated, I received some nice messages saying that nobody had ever found a bug in any of the sofware that I wrote. But this is after the fact; while working they were never particularly interested in high-quality code. And they had no way of judging it except by waiting for years and counting the reported bugs.

So I'd predict that most educators and employers will be pleased by the "hour of code" concept, and will push for its adoption. Then they'll work out the bugs in the approach in the future, as the bugs make themselves known.

Comment Nope (Score 1, Insightful) 165

Unless you're in a position where you absolutely need a certain expert (such as a research project) or a few other special circumstances (if its quit or go remote situation, say someone moving for non-job related reasons).

First off, that whole 15 minutes thing is absolute bullshit. Maybe its a worst case if you were in truly deep thought over one of the hardest problems of the year. But most of the time you aren't, and it will be a few minutes Like around 1.

Secondly- your productivity doesn't matter. The team's does. Those interruptions- it means a team member needs help. They're blocked. Their productivity is at or near 0 until unblocked. If interrupting you costs 15 minutes from you but saves an hour for him, that interruption is worth it for the team. There are almost 0 of those interruptions that aren't a net gain. Now if you have a problem with particular people being too disruptive, that's a management/personnel issue you should bring up to your manager.

Thirdly- not everyone works well in remote situations. Especially not long term (working remote for a day while you wait for a package/your maid/etc is a different matter). Very few people actually end up working as well as they do in an office- there are MORE distractions at home. And communications do not work as well- video conferences do not work as well as talking to someone in person. Even if you're one of those who do work well from home, you won't be as efficient as you would sitting near the rest of the team.

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