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Comment Re:No brainer (Score 2) 170

But arguable robots.txt should not be a way to retroactively mark previously archived content as inaccessible.

Exactly. The policy where someone with no interest in a site (i.e. takeovers, lapsed domains, etc) can retroactive wipe all archives with just a couple lines in a config is flat-out wrong.

Ignoring robots.txt entirely, though, is a bad idea. Some sites use it to block archiving, sure, but some others use it to tell robots to avoid places where they'll never return from. There's a case for ignoring "Disallow: /", or anything that's significantly different from what, say, the Google search indexer is allowed to see.

Comment Well, yes (Score 2) 380

I can definitely understand that sort of reaction for developers, especially if you're talking about small open source projects... those are projects which usually scratch the itch of the developer, so feature requests are definitely going to be an uphill battle if they aren't interesting to the developer (for some definition of "interesting" which might mean "actually useful", "fun to code/play with", "that code is shit and needs refactoring anyways", "suggestion in the form of a patch/pull request", etc).

I think users see software development effort as zero sum; if someone is working on a feature they aren't interested in, then someone isn't working on other stuff they think is important. It's a well-known phenomenon that often comes up when someone talks about the complexity of Microsoft Excel (in the form of the 90-10 rule)... users don't see the bigger picture and only care about their own workflow and how changes impact them.

The easy solution is to simply not give a crap about the opinions of other users of whatever software you use. They don't have your best interests in mind either.

Comment Re:To do list (Score 2) 58

Could be worse. Step 3 could be "get paid to write some pointless crap for Office 365 while a completely different team writes a shittier version of pointless App that doesn't do half the stuff that pointless App did in the first place."

Microsoft has shown an amazing ability lately to take the Golden Goose, kill it, throw it in the oven and then render it into a greasy pile of charcoal. Granted, they're no Yahoo! or Oracle, but they've got the touch.

Comment Re:Seriously? (Score 1) 352

How did so many people think this was a bright idea?

There's a lot of people out there who seem to think that the more money they spend on a "health product", the healthier they'll be.

I... honestly don't know how these people seem to have the disposable income to pay for this stuff. You'd think they'd have been fleeced and left in a cycle of poverty shortly after moving out of their parents home...

Comment Re:It already bears fruit (Score 1, Informative) 619

Only hours after the announcement, corporations all over America started hiring lawyers to find new loopholes in the law.

Given the "swamp draining" skills Trump's shown so far, I'm expecting that he's going to outsource the implementation and enforcement of the H1B program to an Indian corporation...

Comment Re: Macintosh doesn't have apps! (Score 1) 66

The first version of the Macintosh System software had folders, just not folders within folders (due to a file system limitation that was swiftly fixed).

DAs were kind of like TSRs. But I don't remember stickies being among them until well into System 7, at which point they were ordinary applications.

Comment Re:Meh (Score 1) 80

Yeah, I/O isn't blazing, but the Neo's are quite adequate for the workloads I use it for (some of which I've migrated from wifi routers using optware+USB keys, so the bar is quite low). OctoPrint works decently. YMMV, of course, but that's why it's nice to have a broad ecosystem of Pi-like devices rather than just a bunch of pin-for-pin clones.

I wouldn't use the FriendlyElec products for something like a media server; get a proper Pi for that stuff.

Comment Meh (Score 1) 80

A Pi clone is just a cheaper Pi. Nothing we really haven't seen before.

Now, FriendlyElec's Neo series is a bit more interesting... 40mm x 40mm, no GPU... sort of a riff on the Pi Zero, but not a slavish clone and with more port options (ethernet/full-USB on one, WiFi/camera on another, etc). I've got a couple of them running around the house in places a Pi would be overkill, but a Pi Zero would require extra components.

Comment Re:Shocking. (Score 1) 104

Dear Slashdot: I'd be far more interested in commentary by people who don't have a conflict of interest with the topic.

That's kinda what the comments section is for, don't you think?

I mean, we know that most tech articles on Slashdot are bullshit. The comments are where the bullshit gets composted.

Comment Re:One step ahead of Windows but sucking all the s (Score 1) 386

Having a desktop that's identical to a phone has some good points. Sounds good on paper. It's not like it doesn't have any merit at all. But it's a bloody terrible idea.

Unity was introduced as a lightweight out-of-the-way window manager for Ubuntu Netbook Remix version, and on a small screen netbook it was actually quite brilliant compared to the alternatives. The concept of maximizing the menu into the title bar and merging it with the status bar *really* saved a lot of space on a small screen, and auto-maximizing windows is somewhat necessary too.

The concept just doesn't scale so well to dual 24" monitors, although I think most people have kind of gotten used to it.

The main problem I find is that behind Unity, there's a lot of useless Gnome shit still burning cycles...

Comment Re:Such insight! (Score 2) 180

... it makes absolutely no sense for Microsoft to keep trying to exist in a space in which they have proven that they cannot compete. It's just costing them money.

Maybe there's some sort of weird tax loophole... you know, stuff like claiming all their profits in Ireland and keeping a bunch of R&D money sinks in the US so they can transfer profits back without incurring US taxes...

At this point, operating mobile at a loss can't be accidental...

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