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Comment Re:"Shitposting" is fraud, not speech (Score 1) 637

As ridiculous as it is, I don't think anyone really cares. People have largely made their decisions long ago and there's little opinion to sway. There was a study pretty much demonstrating this just recently.

However, I'm just a Canadian eating my popcorn, watching the shit show ensue.

Submission + - SPAM: No More Readers? New Implant May Help Aging Eyes

Mr.Intel writes: Fading, close-up vision is one of the more vexing and ubiquitous consequences of growing older. Presbyopia happens to everyone when the lenses in the eyes lose their flexibility. "It's just a part of getting older," says Dr. Ralph Chu, an ophthalmologist in private practice in Bloomington, Minnesota. But that may be changing. In a little over a year, the FDA approved two new devices to help with age-related vision loss. The most recent to receive approval, the "Raindrop", is made mostly from water and works by reshaping the cornea helping the eye to focus better on close-up objects.

Both of the new implants, Raindrop and KAMRA, go into only one eye. The other eye will be for seeing distance, explains Dr. D. Rex Hamilton, director of the Laser Refractive Center at the Stein Eye Institute at UCLA, and a clinical professor of ophthalmology at the David Geffen School of Medicine. "So the other eye needs to have good distance vision without glasses," Hamilton says, adding that sometimes people have laser surgery to improve the distance vision in the eye that won't be getting an implant to improve vision close-up. Also, Hamilton notes, the implants aren't a "be all end all. They may work quite well for a period of time but a person's lenses will continue to change with age and, ultimately, the patient may need cataract surgery, which replaces the lens, improving both near and far vision, and lasts for the rest of the patient's life.

Link to Original Source

Comment Re: Old school reflective lcd (Score 1) 294

I got rid of the offending lights some time ago (the problem was mainly from a laptop which I now simply slide under some furniture). My question was one of getting to the bottom of why they bothered her and not me. It appears that I am be the odd one out here in apparently having the ability to snore right through the problem.

Comment Re: Old school reflective lcd (Score 1) 294

Can I just ask for some clarification? Are we here discussing LEDs which are so bright that you can see them at night even with your eyes closed or ones you can only see with them open?

The reason I ask is that my wife often complains about LEDs shining at night and in every case, no matter how much I let my eyes accustom to the dark, I can't see them with my eyes closed and since I don't sleep with my eyes open I don't find them a problem. My wife admits that she also can't see them with her eyes closed but still says that they make it hard for her to sleep but she can't explain why.

If someone can provide some sort of convincing explanation of why lights which you can only see with your eyes open make sleeping difficult I would be most appreciative.

Comment Re:Two groups already debunked the myth (Score 1) 248

> powering from the outside with the magnetic field of earth

nah quite certain it's just the presence of the electric field from the magnetron source screwing up all their readings. Once you start messing around with >100W magnetron sources the presence of electric fields will show a voltage reading on just about any voltmeter or any sort of voltage measurement device. You need to spend considerable effort to shield all these potential false signal sources.

If you want a simple example, by pass the interlock on a microwave oven and turn it on while you have someone observe a multimeter set to DC volts from across the room. Quite certain they'll get a non-zero reading, even with no electrical leads connected. Just imagine trying to do this while splitting hairs over milli or micro newtons of thrust with an asymmetric microwave oven.

Years ago while working on my bachelor's degree I was messing around with wireless power transmission experiments with a bunch of employed engineers who had not a fucking clue what they were doing. We wasted countless hours taking measurements of supposed RF-to-DC conversion while all we were observing was the electric field strength increasing around us. It took me on my own reverting to the basics of the entire subject and repeating experiment work from William C. Brown's papers to demonstrate to them how to make it actually work right. The whole experience was extremely frustrating while immensely eye opening - a lot of additional letters after a person's name means almost nothing to me now.

Trying to do real science with a bunch of cargo cult true believers is a fool's errand.

Comment Re:The whole idea is stupid (Score 1) 220

Hey if it improved my application for a work permit I'd have no problem sharing my professional account profiles, like my LinkedIn account. If I had a personal website that I maintained as my CV and hobbies I'd totally provide that - particularly in the case if I had a very common name (I personally don't) and needed to distinguish myself from the bajillion other Mohammed/Muhammed/Mohamed. I'd especially do it if I knew it would expedite the application process. Nothing to hide, etc etc

Submission + - Utahns launch mission to give Earth's moon a proper name (deseretnews.com)

Mr.Intel writes: The Earth's moon is named after its astronomical classification, unlike other planets' moons, which have names. Tawni Henderson of Fruit Heights, Utah wants to change that and has setup a website which has received more than 1,500 suggested names from 30 countries, totaling 4,100 responses.

“Other moons in the solar system have names like Ganymede, Titan, Bianca and Belinda, and they’re the same names in every language. The most beautiful moon in the solar system, our moon — which is currently named after its classification — also deserves one unique name," she said.

Submission + - How Wikipedia manages mental illness and suicide threats among its volunteers (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: Wikipedia has some 68,000 active editors, and as with any given population, some of those people experience mental illnesses or disorders. The online encyclopedia is adamant that "Wikipedia is not therapy!", a statement that some find alienating, and despite that disclaimer, the site has had to come up with ways to respond when a volunteer is in crisis. In this longform narrative, we hear the stories of volunteers who've undergone crises either directly or tangentially related to Wikipedia, and we learn how the website handles—or attempts to handle—those situations.

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