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Submission Summary: 1 pending, 247 declined, 63 accepted (311 total, 20.26% accepted)

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Submission + - The 265 members of Congress who sold you out to ISPs

Presto Vivace writes: They betrayed you for chump change

Republicans in Congress just voted to reverse a landmark FCC privacy rule that opens the door for ISPs to sell customer data. Lawmakers provided no credible reason for this being in the interest of Americans, except for vague platitudes about “consumer choice” and “free markets,” as if consumers at the mercy of their local internet monopoly are craving to have their web history quietly sold to marketers and any other 3rd party willing to pay. ... The only people who seem to want this are the people who are going to make lots of money from it. (Hint: they work for companies like Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T.) Incidentally, these people and their companies routinely give lots of money to members of Congress.

Submission + - The CFPB is asking for public comments on Lending w alternative data:

Presto Vivace writes: Request for Information Regarding Use of Alternative Data and Modeling Techniques in the Credit Process (PDF)

SUMMARY: The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB or Bureau) seeks information about the use or potential use of alternative data and modeling techniques in the credit process. Alternative data and modeling techniques are ch anging the way that some financial service providers conduct business. These changes hold the promise of pot entially significant benefits for some consumers but also present certain potentially significant risks. The Bureau seeks to learn more about current and future market developments, including existing and emerging consumer benefits and risks, and how these developments could alter the marketplace and the consumer experience. The Bureau also seeks to learn how market participants are or could be mitigating certain risks to consumers, and about consumer preferences, views, and concerns. DATES: Comments must be received on or before May 19, 2017.

Submission + - Uber, Volkswagen and Zenefits all used hidden code to break

Presto Vivace writes: What do Uber, Volkswagen and Zenefits have in common? They all used hidden code to break the law.

The world is increasingly dependent on the code that developers create. As such, developers are quickly becoming some of the most powerful people in the world. ... Coding is a superpower. With it, you can bend reality to your will. You can make the world a better place. Or you can destroy it. ... You may be able to fool the regulators, the police, the judges. You may be able to fool the general public. And you may be able to go on doing this indefinitely without being caught. ... But that doesn’t make it right.

Of course the existence of such code is evidence of conspiracy to break the law and would expose the company in question to risk of RICO charges for any jurisdiction with the political will to prosecute such charges.

Submission + - NIST: Cybersecurity Framework Webinars

Presto Vivace writes: Cybersecurity Framework Webinars

This webinar introduces the audience to the Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity (“The Framework”). NIST will provide a brief history about why and how the Framework was developed, and an understanding of each of the three primary Framework components (the Core, Implementation Tiers, and Profiles). Participants will gain an understanding of potential benefits of Framework, and how the Framework can be used. NIST will highlight industry resources, progress in Roadmap areas, and future direction of the Framework program. A Q&A session with participants will follow. ... Cybersecurity Framework Update Webinar On January 10, 2017 NIST released proposed updates to the Cybersecurity Framework. This draft Version 1.1 of the Cybersecurity Framework seeks to clarify, refine, and enhance the Framework. Updates were derived from feedback NIST received since publication of Cybersecurity Framework Version 1.0.

Submission + - SPAM: Social Media And The 2017 Elections

Presto Vivace writes: DownWithTyranny

Create news alerts on the names of every local politician you wish to track, and then share those links on social media whenever you think appropriate. If you are on your neighborhood or civic association's email list, that is a good place to share news articles. You could share press releases of your favorite politician on such lists, but I would advise caution in that regard. The same people who might be interested in a news article might not be receptive to a politician's press release. ... Don't worry if your link doesn't receive any clicks or shares. The power of precinct work is in its cumulative effect. It is sufficient to make your point, it is not necessary to “win the internet.” What you are attempting here is to draw the connection between your elected official's actions and what is happening in your community.

Submission + - Signal, spies and the cult of crypto

Presto Vivace writes: Surveillance Valley

Signal (like Tor and other related "grassroots" crypto Internet Freedom projects) are creations of America's spooky military-corporate machine. They are regime change weapons, designed to project American imperial power in the age of the Internet. Signal might work if you're chatting with your local neighborhood dealer to score a few grams of coke, but don’t expect it to protect you if you decide to do anything really transgressive — like organizing against concentrated corporate political power in the United States. ... And that's what makes Signal's successful marketing to activists in America so disturbing.

Submission + - How to Use Social Media at a Protest Without Big Brother Snooping

Presto Vivace writes: Timothy Fadek for WIRED

Your smartphone can reveal essentially your entire digital life, so part of protecting your privacy while protesting is making sure that data doesn’t fall into the wrong hands. Should an altercation with police take place, they could seize your phone and may have cause to search it. Leaving it at home and packing only a standalone camera, or bringing a burner phone, are two ways to ensure that the device you have on you isn’t tied to your online identity. ... ... If you do bring your everyday device, encrypting it with a passcode, using the camera while the phone is still locked, and using end-to-end encrypted messaging services are all ways to protect yourself from proactive government surveillance at marches and rallies. And make sure you have a backup of the data on the device. That way if you want to ditch it, you won’t lose everything.

Submission + - Vapour Voting in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

Presto Vivace writes: Jill Stein has done the nation a tremendous public service

Pennsylvania has the worst voting system of all. The vast majority of voters use machines with no paper ballot to verify the vote. According to leading computer scientists, these direct recording electronic machines, or DREs, are unreliable, antiquated and easy to hack. ... ... The machines claim, for example, that more than 4,000 voters in Montgomery County , Pa., took the trouble to go to the polls, then supposedly voted for no one in any election. In reality, when these voters in Montgomery selected candidates on the machine, a “no vote” box popped up, meaning thousands of votes were lost inside those machines.

Submission + - How Internet Service Providers Promote Poverty

Presto Vivace writes: Digital Redlining: How Internet Service Providers Promote Poverty

A study by the Center for Digital Democracy published in March found that internet service providers, including Comcast, Cox Communications, Time Warner Cable and Verizon reap income, education level and purchase behavior data points to sell to the likes of financial marketers, fast food companies and health care businesses. Advertisers may buy financial data, for example, to market high-interest credit card or loan offers to consumers in debt. The report also asserted that, in conjunction with its data partners, Verizon offers advertisers "targeting packages" directed toward low-income communities that specifically push gambling, cigarette smoking and soda consumption.

Submission + - Orwell's toys

Presto Vivace writes: These Toys Don’t Just Listen To Your Kid; They Send What They Hear To A Defense Contractor

According to a coalition of consumer-interest organizations, the makers of two “smart” kids toys — the My Friend Cayla doll and the i-Que Intelligent Robot — are allegedly violating laws in the U.S. and overseas by collecting this sort of voice data without obtaining consent. ... ... In a complaint [PDF] filed this morning with the Federal Trade Commission, the coalition — made up of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC), the Center for Digital Democracy (CDD), and our colleagues at Consumers Union — argue that Genesis Toys, a company that manufactures interactive and robotic toys, and Nuance Communications, which supplies the voice-parsing services for these toys, are running afoul of rules that protect children’s privacy and prohibiting unfair and deceptive practices.

Submission + - EU Data Regulations Will Disrupt Online Advertising Business Model

Presto Vivace writes: New EU Data Regulations Will 'Rip Global Digital Ecosystem Apart'

The European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) doesn't come into force until May 2018, but when it does it will have a profound effect on businesses. The regulation will apply to data about every one of the EU's 500 million citizens, wherever in the world it is processed or stored. ... ... Put simply, targeting and tracking companies will need to get user consent somehow. Everything that invisibly follows a user across the internet will, from May 2018, have to pop up and make itself known in order to seek express permission from individuals.

Submission + - Social media is not your friend

Presto Vivace writes: Of 8 Tech Companies, Only Twitter Says It Would Refuse to Help Build Muslim Registry for Trump

The Intercept contacted nine of the most prominent such firms, from Facebook to Booz Allen Hamilton, to ask if they would sell their services to help create a national Muslim registry, an idea recently resurfaced by Donald Trump’s transition team. Only Twitter said no.

Submission + - SPAM: Audit the ballots

Presto Vivace writes: Want to Know if the Election was Hacked? Look at the Ballots

The only way to know whether a cyberattack changed the result is to closely examine the available physical evidence—paper ballots and voting equipment in critical states like Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania. Unfortunately, nobody is ever going to examine that evidence unless candidates in those states act now, in the next several days, to petition for recounts.

Submission + - Google on the Trump Transition Team

Presto Vivace writes: Google is among the many major corporations whose surrogates are getting key roles on Donald Trump’s transition team.

Joshua Wright has been put in charge of transition efforts at the influential Federal Trade Commission after pulling off the rare revolving-door quadruple-play, moving from Google-supported academic work to government – as an FTC commissioner – back to the Google gravy train and now back to the government. ... The Intercept has documented how Wright, as a law professor at George Mason University, received Google funding for at least four academic papers, all of which supported Google’s position that it did not violate antitrust laws when it favored its own sites in search engine requests and restricted advertisers from running ads on competitors. George Mason received $762,000 in funding from Google from 2011 to 2013.

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