Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Submission + - FCC proposes 5G cybersecurity requirements, asks for industry advice

Presto Vivace writes: “Cybersecurity issues must be addressed during the design phase for the entire 5G ecosystem," FCC chairman Thomas Wheeler previously said.

The FCC published a request Wednesday for comment on a new set of proposed 5G rules to the Federal Register focused on adding specific “performance requirements” for developers of example internet-connected devices. ... If a company hopes to secure a license to access higher-frequency 5G spectrum in the future then they will need to adhere to these specific requirements — in other words, compliance is non-negotiable. Notably, these FCC “performance requirements” now include the submission of a network security plan.

Submission + - Hoping FCC Regulations Can Stop Unjust Police Spying

Presto Vivace writes: Civil rights organizations are pursuing a novel strategy to stop the Baltimore Police Department's dragnet surveillance.

Color Of Change, Center for Media Justice and New America’s Open Technology Institute filed a complaint this week with the Federal Communications Commission, charging that the BDP’s use of mass cell phone surveillance devices known as Stingrays violates regulations of radio waves and cellular networks

Submission + - Internet Voting Leaves Out a Cornerstone of Democracy: The Secret Ballot

Presto Vivace writes: Maintaining the secrecy of ballots returned via the Internet is “technologically impossible,” according to a new report.

That’s according to a new report from Verified Voting, a group that advocates for transparency and accuracy in elections. ... A cornerstone of democracy, the secret ballot guards against voter coercion. But “because of current technical challenges and the unique challenge of running public elections, it is impossible to maintain the separation of voters’ identities from their votes when Internet voting is used,” concludes the report, which was written in collaboration with the Electronic Privacy Information Center and the anticorruption advocacy group Common Cause.

Submission + - Whitehouse, Google cozied up over Anti-trust suit (theintercept.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Intercept reports new emails uncovered by the Oracle-backed Campaign for Accountability show the White House met top Google lobbyists twice in the weeks before the FTC announcement. Controversially, FTC commissioners took the unusual step of overriding their staff’s recommendation to sue Google, and voted to settle the case instead, with the White House official asking Google for talking points.

Submission + - Every Month This Year Has Been the Hottest in Recorded History (vice.com)

iONiUM writes: From the article:

On Wednesday, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced that July was the hottest month ever recorded on our planet, since modern record-keeping began in 1880. NASA has reached the same conclusion. July smashed all previous records.

“We should be absolutely concerned,” Sanchez-Lugo said. “We need to look at ways to adapt and mitigate. If we don’t, temperatures will continue to increase.”

Next year is expected to be slightly less intense, with the fierce El Niño we’ve been experiencing now abating. But the truth is that record-breaking temperatures, month after month, year after year, are starting to look less like an exception, more like the norm.

Submission + - NASA Research publicly available

Presto Vivace writes: From Now On You'll Be Able to Access NASA Research for Free

Any scientists publishing NASA-funded work will be required to upload their papers to a free, online database called PubSpace within a year of publication.

PubSpace is managed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) PubMed Central, which archives biomedical research. You can see NASA-funded studies here, with recent examples including a paper on cardiovascular disease in Apollo astronauts and one on Martian tsunamis caused by meteor impacts.

Submission + - Maker of web monitoring software can be sued

Presto Vivace writes: The WebWatcher lawsuit may have broader implications for employee monitoring and software as a service

The appeals court, in a 2-1 decision Tuesday, rejected Awareness' claims that WebWatcher does not intercept communications in real time, in violation of the U.S. wiretap act, but instead allows users to review targets' communications. While plaintiff Javier Luis' lawsuit doesn't address real-time interception of communications, his allegations "give rise to a reasonable inference" of that happening, Judge Ronald Lee Gilman wrote.

Submission + - The coral die-off crisis is a climate crime and Exxon fired the gun (theguardian.com) 1

mspohr writes: An article published by Bill McKibben in The Guardian points the finger at Exxon for spreading climate change denial which led to lack of action to prevent widespread coral die-off.
"We know the biggest culprits now, because great detective work by investigative journalists has uncovered key facts in the past year. The world’s biggest oil company, Exxon, knew everything there was to know about climate change by the late 1970s and early 1980s. Its scientists understood how much and how fast it was going to warm, and how much damage that was going to do. And the company knew the scientists were right: that’s why they started “climate-proofing” their own installations, for instance building their drilling rigs to accommodate the sea level rise they knew was coming.

What they didn’t do was tell the rest of us. Instead, they – and many other players in the fossil fuel industry – bankrolled the rise of the climate denial industry, helping fund the “thinktanks” and front groups that spent the last generation propagating the phoney idea that there was a deep debate about the reality of global warming. As a result, we’ve wasted a quarter century in a phoney argument about whether the climate was changing."

Submission + - 'Consumer Reports' for software vulnerabilities

Presto Vivace writes: Karen Epper Hoffman reporting for Government Computer News:

During a presentation at last week’s Black Hat conference in Las Vegas, computer scientists Peiter Zatko (better known as Mudge) and Sarah Zatko discussed the independent organization they are building to impartially benchmark commercial software security flaws.



“All the certifications and evaluations that come out, they’re not about security,” said Sarah Zatko, who is chief scientist for the Cyber Independent Testing Lab and a member of the Army's Order of Thor, which recognizes contributions of cybersecurity professionals.

Submission + - The Modernization and Migration Management (M3) Framework

Presto Vivace writes: GSA, OMB release shared-services framework

The Modernization and Migration Management (M3) Framework, posted on GSA's Unified Shared Services Management (USSM) office webpage, breaks system and service modernization projects into six phases: assessment, readiness, selection, engagement, migration and operations.

Those phases are held against four work streams: program management; workforce, organization and stakeholders; technology; and process and service delivery.

Submission + - Older Workers Adapt To New Technology Just Fine, Survey Finds (cio.com)

itwbennett writes: Those older workers in your office, you know, the one ones you think can't handle dealing with new technology? Turns out, they struggle less with technology than their millennial colleagues. A survey by London-based market research firm Ipsos Mori, sponsored by Dropbox, found that older workers are less likely to find using technology in the workplace stressful and experience less trouble working with multiple devices than the younger cohort. The reason for this might lie in all the clunky old technologies older workers have had to master over the decades. Digital Natives don't know how good they've got it.

Slashdot Top Deals

"Paul Lynde to block..." -- a contestant on "Hollywood Squares"

Working...