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Comment Would you like some toast? (Score 1) 49

"Would you like some toast? Some nice hot crisp brown buttered toast. No? How about a muffin then? Nothing? You know the last time you had toast. 18 days ago, 11.36, Tuesday 3rd, two rounds. I mean, what's the point in buying a toaster with artificial intelligence if you don't like toast. I mean, this is my job. This is cruel, just cruel." I was surprised when I heard that they pushed an advertisement out, and shocked when they tried to defend it. Now they're saying it's not an ad because they didn't get money (note the weaseling) for it? That's Don Draper-esque level hubris.

Comment Weird (Score 1) 139

I think this is strange. I work in public procurement in Belgium and under European law all participating companies are notified and have a 15 day period to file a complain before the contract is closed. During that period the decision who receives the contract can still be changed. After this period a company could still file a complain, but can only obtain a financial restitution. I'm surprised this isn't used in US government law.

Submission + - Social media is getting young people drunk (vice.com)

Daniel_Stuckey writes: The Fear of Missing Out (FOMO) phenomenon is part of why people tend to get addicted to social networking and then depressed. And if you're a young, impressionable teenager, it could pressure you into making sure you, too, are happily intoxicated the next time someone snaps a group shot. That's the gist of the latest study to find that social media photos of people drinking and smoking can influence teens into partaking in the same degenerate behavior. The University of Southern California study was published online today in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Submission + - You thought BYOD was a thorny problem? BYO-PC will be even harder (citeworld.com)

mattydread23 writes: As BYOD ("bring your own device") becomes ubiquitous, it's natural to consider the possibilities of extending it to PCs, Macs, and other types of notebook computers. The problem is that legacy technology and approaches may make BYO-PC much more challenging than BYOD. In particular, companies already own a ton of PCs and Macs, so adding personal computers on top of that existing infrastructure can create all kinds of thorny political and technical issues. BYO-Mac, however, may not be quite so hard for many organizations.

Submission + - Feds Charge Wall Street Traders with Code Theft (informationweek.com)

CowboyRobot writes: Three men have been charged with stealing proprietary high-frequency trading algorithms from Amsterdam-based trading house Flow Traders. The accusations include that two of the three, while employees of Flow Traders, emailed strategies, algorithms, and source code to themselves before quitting the company. Theft of proprietary code and algorithms from financial firms is increasingly common, with at least six related U.S. prosecutions since November 2010. But while plaintiffs argue that the code is essential intellectual property, the defense can argue that such information is intrinsically linked to the environment in which it's being run, requires teams of programmers to maintain, and thus is of little use to another organization.

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