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Comment Windows is approaching usability (Score 5, Interesting) 376

I keep a Windows laptop around, to both keep up to date with how recent updates are coming along, as well as to play old games.

Windows is approaching the point where it might be workable for day to day use.

For work purposes, I don't need much, A bunch of terminal windows, a ssh client that can handle private keys stored on a Yubikey, and a web browser.
While the terminal emulation of the Bash prompt in the Ubuntu subsystem is still very poor, I could probably manage most of what I need for work from a windows box.

For my most common hobby, I need a few more things. Good NFS performance, a working automounter, an Xserver that supports hardware accelleration, and for the OS to not intercept any function keys for its own use.

The NFS performance of Windows 10 is decent, but alas if you install autofs into the Linux subsystem, it is unable to mount files. The few attempts I've made at mounting a NFS server from inside of the Linux subsystem have all failed. It appears that all mounts need to be done from Windows itself.

There are decent Xserver options for windows, but they (along with most other programs) suffer from Windows intercepting any press of F1 and using it to pop up a useless help screen, rather than passing it to the underlying application.

As far as I can tell, any program that doesn't make the right system call to indicate that it intends to use F1, will never see those keypresses as windows will intercept them.

If the automounter was working, and if there was a way to disable Window's interception of F1, I might actually be able to use it for hobby use as well.

Until then, I mainly use it for old games, and keep any productive work on Linux, BSD, and OSX.

Comment Re:I really don't understand this drone applicatio (Score 3, Insightful) 43

My believe is that they intend to fly hundreds of these. If you have 100 tethers from 0 to 60,000 ft or so, I believe that you would have many aircraft accidents. Recall that the British used tethered balloons to protect themselves from German air raids. There is no way that you could see those tethers while flying, until you were very close to them -- then it would be too late to avoid.

There are a dozen or so tethered balloons around the border of the US now, so far there have been no incidents that I know of -- but the border is a place where pilots are very observant. Also, the balloons are only at about 10,000 ft or so, so most planes are far higher.

Comment Re:That doesn't work because... (Score 1) 159

You can't change the angle at which the scene is rendered by interpolating between frames.

It's not the raw framerate. It's that the scene your viewing has to match where you're looking that quickly or you get motion sick.

While the parent is Anonymous coward, please rate him up, as that is correct.

Comment Article is bogus (Score 1) 205

This article is mostly bogus; counterfeits are a real problem, but this article isn't actually about counterfeits. The seller is upset with their much cheaper competition that isn't even violating their patents, or Amazons rules.

Also, I find it funny when articles like this imply patent violations but never include the patent number. Patents are very explicit and it can be very misleading to imply a product is violating a patent when in fact they aren't. Even violating a single clause in a patent doesn't mean the patent is violated; individual clauses may not be enforceable due to prior litigation.

Comment Re:Impressive but useful? (Score 4, Insightful) 95

Yeah, 100-600 hz means we aren't talking about any great amount of data at a time.

Pretty much the first thing I thought of. What baud rate would be possible using this? It couldn't be very high. Each 0-to-1 and 1-to-0 transition would have to wait for the fan speed to stabilize and that would take a variable amount of time depending on the fan size.

Interesting concept in the lab but would this really work in a real life situation? Many work environments have all sorts of ambient noise that might interfere with being able to detect the computer's fan noise.

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