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Comment What a great idea! (Score 1) 151

Render the GPS on someone's cellphone useless if they're, unbeknownst to the poor phone user, near a location that the government has decided shouldn't be found via GPS. What happens to the poor soul who needs to call 9-1-1 after gettiing in a nasty car accident or to report a crime and the EMS service or police can't find them because GPS indicates they're miles away from the true location? Short: answer: there a good chance that, if they're seriously injured, they'll probably die. Jeebus, this is that damned stupidest thing I've heard in a while.

Comment Re:Aw come on (Score 1) 106

Yep. Want to bet that at least one of those profile views that you got that chose to check you out anonymously was actually someone in your current employers' HR department?

Back in the days when the Sunday paper was a decent (not great but far from the pretty much complete waste of time it is today) place to see job ads, you could apply to the blind ads -- who might very well be your current employer -- and request that your reply not be submitted should it be from a company that you didn't want to be submitted to (i.e., your current employer) or some other hellhole that you'd never want to work for. One used to hear horror stories, though, about newspapers that didn't see the job seeker's request -- or ignored it -- and wound up getting their resume submitted to the HR people down the hall. What's to stop this from happening at LinkedIn? Especially with all the anonymous profile browsing that LI seems to like getting paid to allow?

Comment Re:Control and management (Score 1) 279

``See if there's anything in the logs that's not what you were expecting, bearing in mind that they'll almost certainly be phoning home to "check for updates" and "backup your data to the cloud" (AKA "monetize your data").''

This could include almost every IP address you find in your logs. Do you know the IP address of every ancillary site that the web sites you visit make connections to while you're browsing their pages? The advertisement servers? Any image servers? The external sites for comments/discussions? Now multiply that by the number of people in your family that use the internet. I haven't seen a single network-aware device that included something in the manual -- or some sort of set of instructions -- that tells you what sites it'll be connecting to on a regular basis. IMHO, we pretty much lost this battle years ago.

Comment Re:200 Million Yahoo "Users" (Score 1) 169

Lately, Yahoo has been nagging me to not use anything but their official apps and web interface to access my email. I guess this news is why.

Screw that. I pay $20/yr for SMS/IMAP access to my email there. That means I get to use Thunderbird and iOS Mail, and they get to keep their servers secure.

I use Yahoo mail regularly, mostly for job search and other official biz. I joined years ago and was able to get [firstname].[lastname] for each member of my family when they started allowing the dot to be used left of the 'at.'

(For personal email and website registrations I use my earthlink address.)

Comment No risk to humans so everything's fine. (Score 5, Insightful) 244

It breaks down rapidly and, in the very low doses at which it is prescribed, should not pose a risk to humans.

Uh... did they test it on other, you know, non-mosquito insects? Have they had their fingers in their ears for the past decade and didn't hear about declining bee populations?

This insecticide might not have a direct effect on humans. But the secondary effect of not having any damned food just might turn out to be rather important.

Comment I saw a rig like this in 2005 (Score 1) 25

When I was shooting Fast and Furious: Tokyo Drift in Tokyo, in winter of 2005, I saw a rig a lot like this. I was walking down a street, and saw a van with four cameras, four LIDARs, and two GPS sensors on the top. I asked a man working on it what it was, and he said "Oh! Are you engineer?" and I confessed that I was just a movie-maker. But, nevertheless, they showed me everything in the van, and said that the point was developing 3D models of all the streets in Tokyo. At the time, it wasn't for self-driving cars though -- they wanted to build 3D in-car maps for navigation. The team of engineers was from a university in Tokyo; although I don't recall which one.

Comment Government? Is that really the issue? (Score 2) 55

While in the past, I agree that people were correct to hold the government accountable for this kind of surveillance, it isn't the biggest issue today. Huge amounts of information are gathered by companies about everybody on the 'net, and shared between them without any limitations. You don't want the government to see your email? Ok, fine -- but Google's incredibly powerful AI team doesn't just see your email -- it *understands* your email. Google can, and does, use that knowledge in any number of ways; and ways that will get more diverse (and perverse?) in the future.

In the not too distant future, I believe that companies like Google and Facebook will become more politically powerful than 99% of the governments in the world. Facebook was going to launch a satellite today to allow everybody in Africa to use Facebook; although somehow the rocket that was going to launch that satellite blew up. My belief is that Facebook wants to get information about everybody on the planet, and will do whatever it takes to do that.

Governments? Come on, that's not the threat.

Comment Windows is approaching usability (Score 5, Interesting) 376

I keep a Windows laptop around, to both keep up to date with how recent updates are coming along, as well as to play old games.

Windows is approaching the point where it might be workable for day to day use.

For work purposes, I don't need much, A bunch of terminal windows, a ssh client that can handle private keys stored on a Yubikey, and a web browser.
While the terminal emulation of the Bash prompt in the Ubuntu subsystem is still very poor, I could probably manage most of what I need for work from a windows box.

For my most common hobby, I need a few more things. Good NFS performance, a working automounter, an Xserver that supports hardware accelleration, and for the OS to not intercept any function keys for its own use.

The NFS performance of Windows 10 is decent, but alas if you install autofs into the Linux subsystem, it is unable to mount files. The few attempts I've made at mounting a NFS server from inside of the Linux subsystem have all failed. It appears that all mounts need to be done from Windows itself.

There are decent Xserver options for windows, but they (along with most other programs) suffer from Windows intercepting any press of F1 and using it to pop up a useless help screen, rather than passing it to the underlying application.

As far as I can tell, any program that doesn't make the right system call to indicate that it intends to use F1, will never see those keypresses as windows will intercept them.

If the automounter was working, and if there was a way to disable Window's interception of F1, I might actually be able to use it for hobby use as well.

Until then, I mainly use it for old games, and keep any productive work on Linux, BSD, and OSX.

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