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Comment Re:Only viable if all planes land themselves (Score 1) 311

The runway is banked, and the angle of the bank is proportional to the radius. Anything moving along the runway, at any speed, should naturally stay on the runway. Slower objects will roll towards the inner, flatter area, and faster objects will zip around the high rim.

The word you want is not banked, it is curved. Unless you say it is progressively banked, but that's solely an unnecessarily loquacious means of stating the same precise thing. But that's just another undesirable added complexity. Now if you don't touch down at the correct lateral position for your airspeed, you're going to have to deal with the runway trying to either dump you off the bottom, or squirt you off the top.

Comment Re: Internet Rape (Score 1) 374

I am just happy that none of the hot topic governmental decisions or actions do not effect me.

Of course they do. Trump is sure to expand visa programs after claiming that he would diminish them, for example. He's stepped up programs that cause people to hate us, which creates more terrorists. Under his watch, congress is selling out our data. I don't know how you imagine these things don't affect you, but get ready. You'll soon see that they do.

Comment Re:Austin 16 minute commute? (Score 1) 235

the 35

Nobody local calls it that except the immigrants from out-of-state.

I started calling it that after I heard locals calling it that. It was over ten years ago, though. I haven't been to Texas in ages. The only thing I miss there are some exes. Not all my exes live in Texas, but some of them do.

Anyhow, you do point out the only way to get such a short commute in Austin: move to the corner of town near where your work is.

And that's precisely what I did when I lived there. And people shit themselves because I paid $1/sqft. Hilarity.

Comment Re:So what? Nothing really has changed... (Score 1) 374

Who follows the rules now? How many of you actually have read the TOS for your ISP? It's privacy policy?

Who gives a shit? If every corporation in America has my data, big deal. It's the government I fear, and they can already demand a full log of all your packets from your ISP under NSL.

There is only one ISP I can realistically use where I live, so it doesn't really matter what their TOS, AUP, PP or anything else says.

Comment Re:What precentage caused by man? (Score 1) 325

I don't think what you said and what I said are different. You can't tell people what they want to hear if you are trying to be accurate.

Some people would like to hear the truth. You can reach those people. You can also reach a percentage of people who would like to hear lies, but it's a pretty small one. It's a variation of the saying about it being difficult to teach a man something if his paycheck depends on him not learning it.

Comment Re:"such an Orwellian model" (Score 1) 63

That's illegal, generally classified as "peeping Tom/voyeurism/invasion of privacy/intrusion of solitude." So let's restrict drone operation in the same manner instead of simply letting them broadcast an ID.

It's already illegal to operate the drone in a manner which violates your privacy. If they're looking in your windows, they're not supposed to be.

I'm not really against drones having transponder signals; I'm against people being able to look up my identity from the signal information. You (or the DA) should have to file a lawsuit to get that information.

Comment Re:Austin 16 minute commute? (Score 2) 235

A good friend of mine lives in Austin and his commute is less than 10

When I worked for Tivoli it took me five minutes just to walk across the Arboretum (at which point I was at work, because I was in the nearest possible apartment complex.) I call shenanigans. Even then it was unusual to have less than a fifteen minute commute. All my friends say the 35 is now a parking lot any time it's vaguely near commute time. If you live in Austin, and you actually have a commute worthy of the name, you're not making it in ten minutes.

Comment Re:Where's the news? (Score 4, Informative) 246

Seriously though, how can a golf ball have 11 patents on it?

Read Costco's reply to the court, in which each patent is listed along with Acushnet's claims and Costco's rebuttal. You can look the patents up online at the USPTO web site. Let's look at a few, shall we?

Patent# 6,994,638 - Golf balls comprising highly-neutralized acid polymers.
Abstract
A golf ball comprising a core comprised of a polymer containing an acid group fully-neutralized by an organic acid or a salt, a cation source, or a suitable base thereof, the core having a first Shore D hardness, a compression of no greater than about 90, and a diameter of between about 1.00 inches and about 1.64 inches; and a cover layer comprising ionomeric copolymers and terpolymers, ionomer precursors, thermoplastics, thermoplastic elastomers, polybutadiene rubber, balata, grafted metallocene-catalyzed polymers, non-grafted metallocene-catalyzed polymers, single-site polymers, high-crystalline acid polymers and their ionomers, or cationic ionomers.

What is claimed is:

1. A golf ball comprising: a core comprising a center and an outer core layer, the center comprising a thermoset polybutadiene rubber composition having a first hardness; and the outer core layer comprising a polymer comprised of an acid group fully-neutralized by an organic acid or a salt of the organic acid, and a cation source or a suitable base of the cation source; and having a second hardness; and an inner cover layer and an outer cover layer comprising ionomeric copolymers and terpolymers, ionomer precursors, thermoplastics, thermoplastic elastomers, polybutadiene rubber, balata, grafted metallocene-catalyzed polymers, non-grafted metallocene-catalyzed polymers, single-site polymers, high-crystalline acid polymers and their ionomers, polyurethnnes, polyureas, polyurethane-ureas; polyurea-urethanes; or cationic ionomers; wherein the first hardness is from about 50 Shore A to about 55 Shore D and first hardness is less than the second Shore D hardness by at least about 10 points.

Here's Costco's rebuttal:

11. Costco is not infringing any valid claims of U.S. Patent No. 6,994,638 (“the ’638patent”). Acushnet has accused Costco of infringing claim 1 of the 638 patent. Costco’s sales of the KS golf ball do not constitute infringement of claim 1 of the 638 patent, however, because, among other things, the Shore D hardness of the center core of the KS ball is not “at least about 10 points” less than the Shore D hardness of the outer core.
12. The 638 patent is invalid under 35 U.S.C. 102, 103 and/or 112. The claims are invalid under 35 U.S.C. 102 and/or 103, for example, in light of U.S. Patent No. 6,468,169 and other prior art publications and activities

Clearly, a lot of chemistry work went into this patent to make the balls have a certain elasticity. Costco says that their balls do not have the same properties, therefore they did not infringe upon this claim.

Here's another:

Patent# 8,123,632 - Multi-layer golf ball
Abstract
Golf balls consisting of a dual core and a dual cover are disclosed. The dual core consists of an inner core layer formed from a rubber composition and an outer core layer formed from a highly neutralized polymer composition.

Here's the claim in question:

"17. A golf ball consisting essentially of: an inner core layer formed from a rubber composition and having a diameter of from 1.100 inches to 1.400 inches, a center hardness (H.sub.center) of 50 Shore C or greater, and an outer surface hardness of 65 Shore C or greater; an outer core layer formed from a highly neutralized polymer composition and having an outer surface hardness (H.sub.outer core) of 75 Shore C or greater; an inner cover layer formed from a thermoplastic composition and having a material hardness (H.sub.inner cover) of from 80 Shore C to 95 Shore C; and an outer cover layer formed from a composition selected from the group consisting of polyurethanes, polyureas, and copolymers and blends thereof. "

While a multi-layer golf ball is nothing new, this patent builds on an older patent for a multi-layer ball. Acushnet claims this is a new innovation that Costco violated. Costco claims otherwise:

15. Costco is not infringing any valid claims of U.S. Patent No. 8,123,632 (“the ’632 patent”). Acushnet has accused Costco of infringing claim 17 of the ’632 patent. Costco’s sales of the KS ball do not constitute infringement of claim 17, however, because, at the least, the surface hardness of the outer core of the KS ball is not 75 Shore C or greater.
16. The 632 patent is invalid under 35 U.S.C. 102, 103 and/or 112. The claims are invalid under 35 U.S.C. 102 and/or 103, for example, in light of U.S. Publication No. 2007/0281802 and other prior art publications and activities.

So Costco again says that because their balls don't have the same properties, they aren't violating this patent. This is all pretty standard legal wrangling.

Comment Re:Where's the news? (Score 1) 246

Just another reason to SHORTEN the length of patents for none drug inventions. There is NO reason on earth that a patent on a golf ball needs to be 20 years

Why not? Is the research into the aerodynamic characteristics of a golf ball more or less worthy than the research into the hydrodynamic characteristics of a blood vessel stent? For that matter, someone who keeps active as a golfer is likely to be healthier longer than someone who is sedentary and requires drugs and other medical interventions to live. Certainly you'd agree that the sporting goods companies have done more good for public health than Martin Shkreli ever did as CEO of a drug company.

Research is research, and the law says that inventors can profit from their inventions. I'm sorry you don't like that.

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