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Comment Re:Wish they'd looked into this sooner (Score 1) 75

I listened to Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Motorhead and pretty much anything loud. Including concerts. And I play electric guitar.
Yet I lie awake at night because a neighbor snores, or the aquarium fish flips its fin at the other side of the house, or the blood coursing through my veins, or the hum of a lamp, or even cats walking across the carpet in the room above mine.
If anything, listening to so much loud music has made me overly sensitive, and I have to sleep with ear plugs. Not that it helps when the birds start chirping outside early in the morning.

Comment Re:Good start (Score 1) 278

Please describe this arena that code competes in and the rules of said competition. I don't recall any job I've done where we created more than one chunk of code to perform the same task and set them into competition.

Others create code that your code competes with. Unless you've cornered the market, you are always in a deadly competition, whether you realize it or not.

Comment Re:Provide this at the state level (Score 1) 278

Since the ability to pursue happiness isn't mentioned at all in the Constitution, I think it's pretty safe to say that it's irrelevant to federal issues.

It is part of the Declaration of Independence, without which the Constitution has no base and is null and void.

Comment Re:Good start (Score 1) 278

When I refactor code it's similar to reorganizing a warehouse. This is not evolution. It's simple management.

The evolutionary aspect is what happens after you refactor your code. It tallies the score on whether you made good or bad decisions. Spend too much time on something that doesn't give your code a competitive advantage, and it fails when competing.
Understanding evolution doesn't mean direct evolution. That's a big clue that you don't understand evolution.
Understanding how evolution works is by always keeping in mind that the least fit are culled, and how to reduce the risks of it being you. You don't have to be best; you just have to not be worse than the competition in any aspect that could cause a survival advantage for them over you.

Comment Re:Provide this at the state level (Score 1) 278

A federal system relies on the assumption that the federal government is smart enough to know what's best for everyone

No, it only relies on the assumption that the federal government is smarter than the dumbest state government in order to raise the floor.

Comment Re:Let's Face It (Score 1) 278

That's funny, I'm using a touch keyboard now, and I can still spell correctly.

Not at any appreciable speed, I am fairly certain. Touch typing is fast, while swiping is slow. So slow that auto-completion becomes an important and integral part of swiping.

Some companies tried that with word processing for touch typists too (long before swiping was invented), and almost all typists turned it off. With touch typing, you could finish a word much quicker than it took to look at the suggestion and accept it.

Comment Re:Provide this at the state level (Score 1) 278

Since education isn't mentioned at all in the Constitution, I think it's pretty safe to say that the 10th means it's not something the Feds have any business doing....

Anything that directly affects an individuals ability to pursue happiness is very much a federal issue.

Comment Re:Good start (Score 2) 278

In very few fields, even science and technology, is an accurate understanding of evolution even remotely helpful.

Au contraire, an understanding of evolution gives a strong advantage in pretty much any field. Whether it's programming or economics, understanding how successful models gain a survival advantage, while the weakest are more subject to predation is more than remotely helpful.
Competition and death is inevitable, and you become more successful by embracing it than fighting or ignoring it.

When deciding what programmers do, evolution plays a part on a daily basis. You want to refactor code? Unless something is detrimental, leave it in. You have two different ways of doing things? Use both if you can, and let time decide which one is best; you may be surprised that it's not always the fastest or most elegant code. You have some spare time? Have individuals compete instead of collaborate. Let the worst projects fail - don't spend a major effort rescuing them.

Similar for any other science. Use your knowledge of evolution. It is a scorekeeper and happens whether you like it or not. So use it to your advantage. Embrace the principles; don't fight them.

Comment Re:Provide this at the state level (Score 4, Interesting) 278

These sorts of programs should not be Federal.

Now I'd like to hear some logic behind that claim.

I can only see detriments. When states pick, the result will differ between them. That leads to unequal opportunities depending on where you were born, and as many gaps between haves and have-nots that divide further as gaps that close. Or more, because there seems to be a strong correlation between the overall poverty of a state and how reluctant it is to support science.

Now if there were evolution for states, I'd be all for it. Every year, force a random poor state to dissolve and be amalgamated with its neighbors, and a random rich state to split in two. Then, doing the right thing would be rewarded by survival over time.
But alas, the competition isn't between the states, which survive no matter what, but between humans, who too often lose because of their state not giving them as good opportunities as other states.

Comment Re:Bad Idea, but that's what Germany is up to now. (Score 1) 64

No, that's 2D, not 3D. It knows the direction your eyes are facing, but not how far away they are, which is needed to project an overlay correctly.
Google glasses can do it because you're always the same distance from the screen, but when driving you aren't, unless someone straps your head to the headrest.
So you need 3D head monitoring, not just 2D. And that's not here yet.

Comment Re:No possible problem with this at all. (Score 1) 64

Perform this thought experiment. You are in a large lecture hall. There is a computer projector displaying a circle on the screen at the front of the room. The projector electronics have taken the angles into account and distorted the incoming video signal so that the displayed image is a circle on the screen. Now move about the room so your perspective of the screen changes. The image on your retina will change based on your angle to the screen, but your brain will still see a circle.

Counter-example: Walk along a school road, and look for the SCHOOL marking in the street. From the side, it's so distorted that it's very hard to make out what it says.

Comment Re:Just what people need, more distractions (Score 1) 64

I'm piloting over a tonne of metal moving at speeds capable of inflicting instantaneous death upon anything in my way; don't fucking distract me by putting on a pretty light show on the road ahead!

Indeed. And this includes strobo lights on bicycles, which are banned in some more civilized countries precisely because they cause accidents for others than the selfish bastard using them for their own protection, fuck everybody else.

Cooperate, and don't distract people who try to control heavy objects at high speed.

Comment Re:Bad Idea, but that's what Germany is up to now. (Score 1) 64

The correct way to do this is with a heads-up display.

That works great if it's calibrated to your head position, and you don't move your head a lot. Not so much for Wayne and Garth.
Head tracking and a fast computer might help, once it not only tracks a 2D head position, but also distance from the windshield.

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