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Comment I can tell you about my experience. .. (Score 5, Interesting) 239

... training my replacement,  after I gave notice.

I am always looking for a new job,  anyone who isn't is a fool.

So, I was/am happily employed by a medium sized ,very high tech , company.  I'm a sys-integration guy, which means I used to be an very good developer, then got more interesting in the bigger picture.  Since I was never satisfied with my knowledge in any aspect of computing,  I became very good with OS fundamentals, networking,  file systems,  and all the other peripheral stuff associated with software development  (revision control,  ticketing, testing,  deployment, you name it,  I know about it )    So Integration came easy.

I  recently found a significantly better paying,  more interesting job, so gave notice.   My company hired an H1B to replace me.

He is useless.   After 3 weeks of fairly intensive OJT, he is still unable to even start to resolve the few minor problems that come up.

I have very,  very little faith that he will be able to take over for me.

I know for a fact that he is being paid less than half of what I am earning.  I  also know that totally qualified locals are available,  for about 85% of my rate.

So, I  have told him,  he shouldn't even have the job, he is taking a decent paying position from a properly qualified local,  and that he should be happy I'm not his boss, cause I'd fire his ass immediately.  I have a pretty good suspicion that he was hired because the project manager' wife (indian) has a H1B recruiting company in India.   She's a bitch and a half too.

Needless to say we're not really on speaking terms.

Fuck the H1B program.   It's just a way to abuse the labor market.  There's no skills shortage,  there's a corporate greed problem.

Comment Poor Techie, get a dose of reality (Score -1, Troll) 805

Seriously, I'm a developer, have been for nearly 30 years.  I've been very well paid throughout that time.

Sorry, poor young Techies , $3000 a month for a quality apartment in the nice parts of the city is absolutely nothing to complain about.   I  was paying that 6 years ago.

I could have lived somewhere cheaper but that would involve other tradeoffs that I am not willing to make.   There's a reason that  $3000 apartment costs that much, you're competing with me, and it sounds like you're losing.

Life's tough, deal with it!

Comment The auto companies are already... (Score 1) 250

...primarily financial services companies.

This ruling, which is totally obvious, will spell the end to auto insurance companies, they'll be swallowed up by the big auto companies, and will be just another part of their businesses.  I say that's a good thing, since the manufacturer carries *all* the risk for their product, instead of the current model, where they (implicitly) lay the risk off to the insurance company.

As long as consumer protection laws are enforced - and adjusted for this new business model - I see good things, not dead people.

Comment Re: send em to Hawaii (Score 2) 274

Ok, so that OP's idea won't work,  although it was creative.

How about a similar solution.

Encase the offending components in something  (glass?)  and position that in such a way that it gets folded into a subduction zone.  Then it gets melted into the earth - kind of like where it came from anyway.

Would something like that work ?

Comment It's kind of a - umm, no shit - statement, (Score 1) 361

totally obvious to any half-way observant person.

All innovation is simply a series of very small steps.  All "discoveries" or "inventions" are at their root, fairly minor enhancements to existing knowledge or craft.

Sure, sometimes those minor enhancements were not at all obvious to anyone except the exceptional person (or team) who made them, but, once the enhancement is announced, it's completely obvious, to anyone willing to analyse it, how it rests on all the past development.

I challenge anyone to find an example of any discovery, invention or other innovation which does not fall into this rule.

Nothing annoys me more (well, not many things anyway, dirty dishes, unmade beds, ....) than people wandering around talking about be "entrepreneurs" , and "creatives", with this shit-faced superiority that only ignorance and inexperience can produce..  Most (98%+) of end up failing, spectacularly, because they think all the value is in the idea, rather than the implementation of the idea.  Reality shows us, 99.999999% of the value is in the implementation of the idea, the idea is nearly worthless.

I think this is what Linus would say if he had conferred with me first.

Comment Clearly the problem is not pay (Score 3, Insightful) 95

Rather it is the overall work environment.

From what I've read, and from the very few first hand accounts from Google employees I've heard, the work environment at Google pretty much sucks unless you are running a successful project (i.e.  *THE* project leader).  This is little different from being CEO of your own company.

Maybe the issue Google - like very many other employers needs to understand - is that the vast majority of people really do work to live, not the other way around.  The idea that it's considered normal to do a 60+ hour week is just bullshit.  All the free ice cream in the world doesn't compensate for that.

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