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Comment Scott Adams disagrees (Score 2) 140

Scott Adams would like a word with you:

Kahan found that increased scientific literacy actually had a small negative effect: The conservative-leaning respondents who knew the most about science thought climate change posed the least risk. Scientific literacy, it seemed, increased polarization. In a later study, Kahan added a twist: He asked respondents what climate scientists believed. Respondents who knew more about science generally, regardless of political leaning, were better able to identify the scientific consensus—in other words, the polarization disappeared. Yet, when the same people were asked for their own opinions about climate change, the polarization returned. It showed that even when people understand the scientific consensus, they may not accept it.”

Notice how the author slips in his unsupported interpretation of the data: Greater knowledge about science causes more polarization.

Well, maybe. That’s a reasonable hypothesis, but it seems incomplete. Here’s another hypothesis that fits the same observed data: The people who know the most about science don’t think complex climate prediction models are credible science, and they are right.

In fact, there's more incentive to lie about climate science than cancer research: More immediate funding is at stake, more groupthink applies, it will be decades before others can prove you wrong, and unlike falsified cancer research, people won't die because you misdirected searcher.

And as for saying "the fraud was in the review process, not the work itself," that's like saying "Well, Anthony Weiner was only caught sexting. He never actually cheated." The odds that the fraud we've caught is the only fraud committed by those willing to commit fraud would seem pretty low...

Comment sigh (Score 1) 129

The Fsck'n companies can't even expand manage and compete in their terrestrial areas, there is no way they should be allowed access to orbit. The lag associated with satellite internet access is awful. Why should we let them have access and compete with Hughes net when they won't compete with their land bound opposition. Screw AT&T, Spectrum, Rogers, and Shaw.

Comment Re:Was going to buy one (Score 1) 47

Nah I lucked into a wonderful women who had a great kid by a deadbeat loser Dad. I really enjoy having the kid around and I did not have to go through the terrible 2's with him. He's old enough that he appreciates me, and I can like him as a person. The best part is his mother likes Hockey and drinks beer as well. I met her at a Sharks game, we both have season tickets...

Comment personalize the trigger words/name ? (Score 1) 606

I would think the next step is to voice print yourself and train google/alexa to respond to only a specific voice or group of voices. It would seem to make sense to change the name google/alexa responded to, to something personalized as well, say Oscar, like the system developed by a character in the following books...

http://www.goodreads.com/serie...

Comment Re:Was going to buy one (Score 1) 47

It is more an issue of dead pixels than of potential scratches or such in the future. I doubt that I would use the device as a portable much anyways, I was mainly looking to play the new Zelda game and would very likely use it most of the time hooked to my big screen. I do very little portable gaming even on my laptop. But I do enjoy a good session of FPS shooter, and I love old school RPG's, almost as much as I like table top pen and paper role playing. The GF's kid and I have a blast teaming up in Battlefield as pilot and gunner, he's a really good pilot and it is not unheard of us to go an entire game in one vehicle. I will probably still get one but more toward the end of the year for a Christmas present or for a birthday gift for him in November.

http://www.pcmag.com/news/3522...

Comment Was going to buy one (Score 1) 47

I was going to buy one but after the bad press about screen quality I asked the store to allow me to see the screen before I purchased it and they (Best Buy) refused to allow me to open one prior to purchase, so I deferred. Not that it hurt their sales at all, some lady took the one I had from my hands and bought it.

AI

AI Programs Exhibit Racial and Gender Biases, Research Reveals (theguardian.com) 384

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: An artificial intelligence tool that has revolutionized the ability of computers to interpret everyday language has been shown to exhibit striking gender and racial biases. The findings raise the specter of existing social inequalities and prejudices being reinforced in new and unpredictable ways as an increasing number of decisions affecting our everyday lives are ceded to automatons. In the past few years, the ability of programs such as Google Translate to interpret language has improved dramatically. These gains have been thanks to new machine learning techniques and the availability of vast amounts of online text data, on which the algorithms can be trained. However, as machines are getting closer to acquiring human-like language abilities, they are also absorbing the deeply ingrained biases concealed within the patterns of language use, the latest research reveals. Joanna Bryson, a computer scientist at the University of Bath and a co-author, warned that AI has the potential to reinforce existing biases because, unlike humans, algorithms may be unequipped to consciously counteract learned biases. The research, published in the journal Science, focuses on a machine learning tool known as "word embedding," which is already transforming the way computers interpret speech and text.

Comment Then maybe Democrats should change policies (Score 1, Insightful) 341

Maybe if Democrats weren't relentlessly pushing for bigger government and SJW victimhood identity politics they could compete with Republicans.

But they chose a relentless drive for power and pushing the culture war over policies Americans actually want. Democrats deliberately pushed "blue dogs" out of the party so progressives could control it to-to-bottom. Democrats backed Bloomberg on civilian disarmament, backed Soros and Steyer on funding #BlackLivesmatter, insisted a man changing his name magically made him a woman, and then wonder why ordinary Americans no longer vote for them.

And really, where are Republicans stopping Democrats in such paradisaical deep blue enclaves like Chicago and Detroit?

The Internet

Tennessee Could Give Taxpayers America's Fastest Internet For Free, But It Gave Comcast and AT&T $45 Million Instead (vice.com) 341

Chattanooga, Tennessee is home to some of the fastest internet speeds in the United States, offering city dwellers Gbps and 10 Gpbs connections. Instead of voting to expand those connections to the rural areas surrounding the city, which have dial up, satellite, or no internet whatsoever, Tennessee's legislature voted to give Comcast and AT&T a $45 million taxpayer handout. Motherboard reports: The situation is slightly convoluted and thoroughly infuriating. EPB -- a power and communications company owned by the Chattanooga government -- offers 100 Mbps, 1 Gbps, and 10 Gpbs internet connections. A Tennessee law that was lobbied for by the telecom industry makes it illegal for EPB to expand out into surrounding areas, which are unserved or underserved by current broadband providers. For the last several years, EPB has been fighting to repeal that state law, and even petitioned the Federal Communications Commission to try to get the law overturned. This year, the Tennessee state legislature was finally considering a bill that would have let EPB expand its coverage (without providing it any special tax breaks or grants; EPB is profitable and doesn't rely on taxpayer money). Rather than pass that bill, Tennessee has just passed the "Broadband Accessibility Act of 2017," which gives private telecom companies -- in this case, probably AT&T and Comcast -- $45 million of taxpayer money over the next three years to build internet infrastructure to rural areas.

Comment Of course (Score 1) 903

The point is we don't get much for our tax dollars, at least at the federal level. No health care, no say in the election process
I'd pay more federal taxes if I received tangible benefits for my contribution. What our federal taxes do go for is personal protection for the petrochemical industries overseas interests, travel benefits for national reps and senators.
My state/local taxes get me part of my health care benefits, pays for the roads in my area. /rant

Comment Re:More Amusing than that... (Score 1) 169

Actually I just used hoodie from the person I responded to. I wear a plush warm microfiber pull over. No zipper to lay on, and as a bonus I slide across the raised tiles like a curling stone on ice. The lab is a normal 68F(20C) regardless of outside temp so in the summer in California you run the real risk of getting sick from the drastic temperature change. I could wear a hoodie if I wanted to, but security would make me pull the hood down at the lobby, upon access to the equipment floor where the lab is located and at the lab access door, for some reason they object to letting the Unabomber in the secured areas :)

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