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Submission + - 'Star Trek' actor Anton Yelchin dies in freak car accident (cnn.com) 1

walterbyrd writes: Actor Anton Yelchin, 27, who played Chekov in recent "Star Trek" movies, was killed in a freak accident early Sunday morning, police told CNN.

Yelchin stepped out of his car in the driveway of his Studio City home at around 1:10 a.m. PT when the car slid backwards and pinned him against a brick pillar and a security fence, causing trauma that led to his death, said Jennifer Houser with the Los Angeles Police Department.

Submission + - Court upholds 'net neutrality' rules for equal internet access (chicagotribune.com)

walterbyrd writes: In a big win for the Obama administration, a federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the government's "net neutrality" rules that require internet providers to treat all web traffic equally.

The 2-1 ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit is a victory for consumer groups and content companies such as Netflix that want to prevent online content from being blocked or channeled into fast and slow lanes.

Submission + - Systemd now kills processes when you sign out (pcworld.com) 4

walterbyrd writes: The initialization software systemd has now been integrated into most popular Linux distributions, including the latest versions of Ubuntu. But a change in systemd 230 alters the way Linux and other UNIX-like operating systems have worked for decades, and some Linux users aren’t pleased.

Systemd now kills processes when you sign out Thanks to a new change, systemd will automatically kill a user’s processes when that user logs out. Previously, it was possible to start long-running processes that remained running, even when you signed out. You could use the tmux, screen, or nohup commands to ensure that a process remained running. Systemd will now kill all those leftover processes to clean things up.

This change is being debated in Debian’s bug tracker, and on Fedora’s mailing list. On Fedora’s mailing list, systemd’s Lennart Poettering explained that systemd is designed to be “a process babysitter.” Red Hat’s DJ Delorie expressed why he and some other Linux users are frustrated: “It’s becoming a user nanny instead. I wish it would stop trying to enforce its ‘my way or the highway’ approach to system rules. I’ve been playing whack-a-mole trying to keep up with all the tweaks I need (assuming I can find them) to let me do what I want to do with my own machine.”

There’s a new secret handshake Of course, systemd provides a way to disable this behavior and keep processes running, if that’s what you want. To do this, a system administrator can set the “KillUserProcesses=no” option in systemd’s configuration file at /etc/systemd/logind.conf. Linux distributions could also choose to disable this systemd feature for all their users, which is what some Debian and Fedora users are asking for. In both cases, the feature would be disabled systemwide.

If just a specific user wants to run processes that are left alone by systemd, that user has to enable “lingering” for their account, with the systemd-run command preceding the tmux, screen, or nohup commands. So, if you end up using a Linux distribution with systemd 230 or newer that has this option enabled, you’ll need to run tmux, screen, and nohup commands in a systemd-specific way. It would make sense for these tools to become systemd-aware to negate this new secret handshake, but they aren’t, and users will therefore need to use this new workaround.

Comment Is it worth all the fuss? (Score 1) 321

Seems to be that most movies make almost all of revenue within the first year. By that time, there may be a tiny trickle of income from DVD rentals, or online streaming services, but that is about it.

By the time a movie, or a song, or a book, is over eight years old; I doubt it's bringing in anything.

Actually, I think about the revenue, from a movie, may come from the opening weekend.

So why the huge hissy fit about old movies on youtube?

Submission + - Google beats Oracle: Android makes "fair use" of Java APIs (arstechnica.com)

walterbyrd writes: Following a two-week trial, a federal jury concluded Thursday that Google's Android operating system does not infringe Oracle-owned copyrights because its re-implementation of 37 Java APIs is protected by "fair use." The verdict was reached after three days of deliberations.
Oracle, however, vowed to appeal.

Comment From: Oxford Journal: Clinical Infectious Diseases (Score 1) 203

> "Some people argue that antibiotic-resistant strains that develop in food animals are largely irrelevant to human health because E. coli strains are relatively species-specific and so will not cause disease in people. This current study [5] shows that argument is flawed."

http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/49/2/202.full

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