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Comment Re: good luck with that one... (Score 1) 172

It remains the case that the law was brought down because of arguments about incompatibility with the current EU rules. Had those EU rules not applied, there would have been no basis for the issues raised in the judicial review. The legal technicalities of the judicial review process don't change that fundamental situation, nor does the lack (so far) of a CJEU reference.

Also yes, lots of other Member States have private copying exceptions, but most of them caved to industry pressure and introduced some sort of levy on their citizens in return. Those levies have been widely criticised, both for increasing prices of media and devices even where they would not subsequently be used for private copying purposes and for the manner in which the proceeds of those levies were distributed. If you read the EU resolution you linked yourself, you'll find it's extremely careful about the wording around that exception and it most certainly does not imply that the UK's private copying exception would be reinstated on the original basis or that similar levies should not be applied in the UK.

Comment Re:AV only helps if you are bad (Score 1) 193

Sure, but that trust only extends as far as whoever implemented those security measures and signed those binaries. We live in an era when your own OS may well be spying on you, your new laptop may be shipped with vendor-installed spyware right out of the factory, your new PC's CPU almost certainly has secondary functionality built-in that you can't examine or control, any of those things potentially lead to not just privacy but also system control vulnerabilities, and that's just the threats your chosen commercial partners openly-ish advertise before you get into criminals or state security services physically modifying something between the manufacturer's facility and yours.

Comment Re: AV only helps if you are bad (Score 4, Insightful) 193

Sometimes, but there are no guarantees these days. Once a system has been compromised, it is now almost impossible to make sure it's clean again no matter what you do to recover. In a world with the likes of UEFI and "hidden" secondary processors within CPUs, even wiping the hard drive and reinstalling from known good media isn't a reliable fix. It's all rather depressing, this so-called progress.

Comment Re: AV only helps if you are bad (Score 2) 193

The trouble is, all of that remains true if you have anti-virus software installed. Your odds might be slightly better overall, but AV software doesn't catch everything. In a few cases, AV software has even opened additional vulnerabilities itself.

It's surprisingly difficult to be sure that you're only running what you think you're running in 2016 and that your data is safe and private. That's a real and serious problem regardless of which if any AV tools you run.

Comment Re:Google's reply? (Score 1) 172

I agree it's unfortunate that so many people just rely on headlines, and that those headlines are sometimes less than perfect, but that's just the reality of what happens. Did you hear the one about the Slashdotter who actually read TFA before commenting?

So as long as that remains the reality, news organisations could plausibly be losing a significant amount of the value of their work if others are allowed to literally copy and paste the headlines and maybe some introductory snippets and republish them without doing any of the real leg work required to get the stories.

Comment Re:Given the reviews (Score 0) 453

Indeed, literally days before the release Sean was at Darmstadt telling a German interviewer that the game is just like in the trailers.

The trailers were, of course, all rigged. You can even find the models they used to rig it in the unpacked game files - lacking the articulations and animations needed for actual use in game.

And then let's not forget the "pretend that the lack of multiplayer is a bug because too many people are playing" aspect once players started discovering the ruse.

Comment Re:I'm having fun (Score 0) 453

Actually, no. It was very explicitly defined. Sean Murray, right up to days before the release, made explicit, yes-or-no responses to things contained in the game. Almost all of which were false. When things started turning out to not be in the game, such as multiplayer, he pretended it was a "bug" that people couldn't see each other - even though it was demonstrably not supported, including there being no real-time network traffic and no player models in the game files.

It's not a case of "buyers filling in the gaps". It's a case of the developer deliberately trying to deceive customers about what the game contained. Including putting a deliberately long painful grind to reach the center of the galaxy, and telling people that all sorts of neat stuff was near the center, to keep them playing for long periods of time. A cynical individual would view that as them deliberately trying to get people to play for too long to get a refund.

Comment Re:If your ads for "Titanic" say the ship sinks (Score 0) 453

Apparently you don't know the difference between a statement of opinion and a statement of fact.

Ad: "Ghostbusters is funny"
You: "It wasn't funny."

Liability: None. Because that's an opinion.

Vs.

Ad: "Ghostbusters stars Tom Hanks."
You: "No, it doesn't."

Liability: Yes. Because that's false advertising.

Understand the difference?

Comment Re:50 hours of crap. (Score 2) 453

You'd have as much luck "meeting up" in Super Mario Brothers. There is no real-time networking traffic and no player models in NMS. The "whoops, there must be a bug" reaction is a baldfaced lie.

And the claim that it's unrealistic to reach the same place are BS. There are not 2^64 stars in the starting galaxy (Euclid), only a few tens of billions. And everyone starts out roughly the same distance from the center, which means that they're all in a narrow spherical shell containing only a tiny fraction of those stars. It's rare in the game to not come across systems discovered by others, even when you're not trying.

(The 2^64 claim is valid, but only in that there are 2^32 galaxies)

As for day and night, the game is totally inconsistent about that. You can approach the "day" side of a planet and have it turn out to be night, and vice versa. Really it's hard to think of something in the game that's *not* totally glitched. Even keyboard support is glitched - punctuation in naming discoveries gets mixed up. I mean, how the heck do you even manage to mess up something like that? Oh god, let's not get into the naming filter that lets through names like "Cum Mountain" but bans words like "Cousin" and "Can't".

Comment Re:good luck with that one... (Score 2) 172

It's a complicated relationship, with pros and cons. Certainly a lot of things get blamed on the EU without any rational justification. On the other hand, plenty of things also get blamed on the EU with some rational justification. There is one particularly evil political technique where something that would never get passed back home gets punted to the EU where it's relatively out of sight, and then comes back usually via a Directive a couple of years later, at which time the government can not only claim they have no choice about implementing it but also say they have no way to influence the details... even while their own representatives and allies within the EU were the ones pushing for the new measures in the first place.

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