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Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 333

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 279

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Comment Re:First lesson (Score 4, Interesting) 135

I have two major beefs with IPV6. The first is that the end-point 2^48 switch address space wasn't well thought-through. Hey, wouldn't it be great if we didn't have to use NAT and give all of those IOT devices their own IPV6 address? Well... no actually, NAT does a pretty good job of obscuring the internal topology of the end-point network. Just having a statefull firewall and no NAT exposes the internal topology. Not such a good idea.

The second is that all the discovery protocols were left unencrypted and made complex enough to virtually guarantee a plethora of possible exploits. Some have been discovered and fixed, I guarantee there are many more in the wings. IPV4 security is a well known problem with well known solutions. IPV6 security is a different beast entirely.

Other problems including the excessively flexible protocol layering allowing for all sorts of encapsulation tricks (some of which have already been demonstrated), pasting on a 'mandatory' IPSEC without integration with a mandatory secure validation framework (making it worthless w/regards to generic applications being able to assert a packet-level secure connection), assumptions that the address space would be too big to scan (yah right... the hackers didn't get that memo my tcpdump tells me), not making use of MAC-layer features that would have improved local LAN security, if only a little. Also idiotically and arbitrarily blocking off a switch subspace, eating 48 bits for no good reason and trying to disallow routing within that space (which will soon have to be changed considering that number of people who want to have stateful *routers* to break up their sub-48-bit traffic and who have no desire whatsoever to treat those 48 bits as one big switched sub-space).

The list goes on. But now we are saddled with this pile, so we have to deal with it.


Comment Flood defenses? (Score 5, Informative) 135

There is no flood defense possible for most businesses at the tail-end of the pipe. When an attacker pushes a terrabit/s at you and at all the routers in the path leading to you as well as other leafs that terminate at those routers, from 3 million different IP addresses from compromised IOT devices, your internet pipes are dead, no matter how much redundancy you have.

Only the biggest companies out there can handle these kinds of attacks. The backbone providers have some defenses, but it isn't as simple as just blocking a few IPs.


Comment Re:Interesting, Dave Chappelle. (Score 1) 552

So, smokers yes, races no.


In your fallacious example, you attempt to conflate an activity with a state of being. You cannot ban a black person for being black. Likewise, you cannot ban a smoker for being a smoker. However, you can ban the activity of smoking in your venue.

Comment Re:No, it's not time. (Score 1) 183

You just use the scroll-wheel. The scroll bar is always a last resort. I prefer the scroll-wheel myself, but if the system doesn't have a mouse -- that is, one only has the trackpad, then either two-finger scrolling (Apple style) or one-finger-right-side-of-pad scrolling is a pretty good substitute.


Comment Primary problem is the touchpad hardware (Score 1) 183

The real problem is the touchpad hardware. The touchpad device itself may not be able to accurately track three or four fingers, and there isn't a thing the operating system can do to fix it. I've noticed this on chromebooks, in particular when I ported the touchpad driver for the Acer C720. The hardware gets very confused if you put more than two fingers down on the pad horizontally (or you cross them horizontally while you slide your fingers around).

It basically makes using more than two fingers very unreliable. My presumption is that a lot of laptops out there with these pads probably have the same hardware limitations.


Comment Re:So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 1) 207

Like Boost, too much simple sugar.

Water, Corn Maltodextrin, Sugar, Blend of Vegetable Oils (Canola, Corn), Milk Protein Concentrate, Soy Protein Isolate, Cocoa Powder (Processed with Alkali). Less than 0.5% of: Nonfat Milk, Magnesium Phosphate, Sodium Citrate, Soy Lecithin, Natural & Artificial Flavor, Calcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Cellulose Gum, Potassium Citrate, Choline Chloride, Ascorbic Acid, Cellulose Gel, Carrageenan, Salt, Ferric Phosphate, dl-Alpha-Tocopheryl Acetate, Zinc Sulfate, Niacinamide, Manganese Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Copper Sulfate, Thiamine Chloride Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Palmitate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Biotin, Chromium Chloride, Sodium Molybdate, Sodium Selenate, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin B12, Phylloquinone, and Vitamin D3.

Comment Re:So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 1) 207

The closest would be Boost Plus, which still comes in short on calories and way too much simple sugar. Look at the ingredients!

Water, Corn Syrup, Sugar, Vegetable Oil (Canola, High Oleic Sunflower, Corn), Milk, Protein Concentrate, Cocoa Processed with Alkali, and Less than 1% of: Calcium Caseinate, Soy Protein Isolate, Sodium Caseinate, Gum Acacia, Fructooligosaccharides, Potassium Citrate, Inulin (from Chicory), Soy Lecithin, ...

Comment Re:So, what's Soylent really about? (Score 1) 207

First, you're not realizing what I bill those customers. I don't want to wave money around on Slashdot but I assure you, you too would drink an unoffensive bottle of Soylent for that much. The main thing it buys me is freedom, and there is no shortage of pleasure coming from that. I can work on what I want most of the time, or not work, if I just keep a few of those customers.

Second, you can't have any of the real pleasures in life without your health. You are evolved to be attracted to foods that would have been infrequent windfalls throughout most of the evolution of human beings. Now, you can have them for every meal, and your body is sending you the signals to do so despite the fact that those foods will ultimately be detrimental to you. If you are still compelled to eat them, there's a pretty good chance that's the addiction talking.

Comment Re:He was never really honored the first time arou (Score 5, Interesting) 91

This is what makes Sundar Pichai's tweet especially puzzling. When Steve Jobs passed away, Google gave over its home page to a memorial, with a link to a page on Apple's Web site. There wasn't even a discussion on whether this was appropriate; it was simply done, because of course it should be done.

A week later, DMR passes, who was arguably a greater contributor than Jobs, yet no memorial appeared on Google's home page. One of the excuses given was that potential destinations for a memorial link wouldn't be able to handle the traffic. Even after being called on it during a company meeting, Google management remained unswayed.

I thought their handling of the affair was rather ad-hoc and sloppy -- not in line with the company's image at all.

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