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Comment Re:Now I know how the rest of the world feels... (Score 1) 227

Next time I'm going to be more clear about what I'm trying to convey.

I wasn't criticizing the summary, I was amused by it, and then reflected that most non-US visitor probably feel like this all the time.

Clearly I need to use more smiley faces next time. :) :) :) :)

Comment Re:Look it up already! (Score 1) 143

Note that this is audience-specific--if you're writing for /., you shouldn't have to say...

Agreed - that's exactly what I'm pushing. Here on /. we should be expected to know about technology, or have enough interest to go look it up (or be mature enough to ignore it). One of the ways that /. can differentiate itself from other websites is by attracting a more technically proficient audience, and part of that is to implicitly establish the 'floor' of knowledge expected of participants.

Personally, I find this to be a good way to figure out what I ought to know - if something comes up and I don't know what it is I might ignore it the first time. And the second time. By the third time it's clear that I need to know more about it because clearly it's important.

Also - I love your technology examples :)

Comment Look it up already! (Score 1) 143

If you have to ask, you should first look it up, then ask an informed question

One of the reasons why I come here is to be exposed to tech that I haven't seen before. See something that you're not familiar with? Look it up!
Especially for this topic - "Xamarin", just by itself, is an extremely unique search term thus enabling you to self-educate with almost no effort. And today the whole Xamarin+VS is at the top of any search results for either.

Slashdot is "news for nerds", not "news for people who kinda like plunking around on their computers in between their online first-person shooter games but don't really want to have to, y'know, think about this stuff"

Comment Human story-selectors is a good idea (Score 1) 1839

I want to support the idea of having actual humans choosing the stories.

My understanding of the firehose is that it's supposed to automate/crowd-source the stories we see, but when you've got valid accounts used by spammers to place their stories/comments then it no longer works. Even if the firehose is used to make something more noticeable to the editors we still need actual humans preventing stealth slashvertisements, etc.

Comment Display controversial posts - yes! (Score 1) 1839

I just wanted to support the idea of detecting & displaying controversial posts - it's a really good idea!

I could imagine an implementation wherein readers might have a checkbox available to them (perhaps right next to the 'what level do you want to browse at?' slider) to turn the display of controversial posts on / off.
But having a checkbox vs. always showing them vs. something else is just details - the main thing is that this is a really good idea.

Comment Trolls ok, Slashvertisements bad (Score 1) 1839

I agree that the moderation system largely takes care of the trolls.

I think that 'Slashvertisements' are much, much worse. You'll see a string of articles for some product/service/etc over a couple of weeks or so that are clearly being paid for by somebody, and then their budget is spent and the articles stop. Bitcoin had a run like this, as did solar power, and a couple of others.

Comment Awww, c'mon guys - I know that we hate MS here... (Score 1) 133

...but isn't this the equivalent of going over to a bunch of kids on the playground and saying "That new kid over there said he could beat up each and every one of you! With one hand tied behind his back!"

What I'm wondering is: who paid to have this on /.'s front page so that armies of geekdom are mobilized to find all the new, Edgy exploits?

Comment Is this why they always fix things in Star Trek? (Score 0) 49

I always wondered why 'Star Trek' characters seemed to spend a good fraction of the episodes rebuilding critical parts of their spaceship/gun/etc on the fly, under duress, and with a limited amount of time. I mean yes, obviously, some of it was just good (suspenseful) TV, but it's interesting to hear that there was actually an era when the person doing the engineering work would later be the one to actually go on the mission. Maybe they modeled Star Trek off people like this guy.

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