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Comment Re:67% is not that good (Score 1) 69

It's good for the NAO. When you're pushing the boundaries, anything over 50% is good.

For long-term climate models, things like the NAO average out across many years. For short-term weather forecasting, you have a week or more before the system diverges enough to cease to be useful. But it's tougher working on those in-between scales.

Comment Re:No it can't (Score 1) 69

Should be well worth it in terms of things like planning for agricultural products, natural gas supplies, etc.

The real issue however is that they've validated it with hindcasting. Which is certainly something, but isn't as ideal as you'd want. It's trivially easy to fit any arbitrary past dataset to a statistical model if you have enough parameters that can be tweaked, but that doesn't mean that you're actually capturing the underlying dynamics. That said, from the sound of it it's built around a physical model, so that increases the odds that it actually is, rather than just fitting to some arbitrary curve.

Comment Heh, haven't heard that name in a while. (Score 1) 113

I used to follow some of what The Jester wrote. There are a number of people out there who think he's overrated, more brag than anything else. Still, I saw some pretty clever things out of him. For example, at one point he was going after some other hacking collective (I don't recall which one), and he announced a successful attack against them and posted a list of all of their names and real IP addresses. Only, the list wasn't real. Instead, anyone who tried to download the list had their connection logged and probed, an exploit used to trigger the computer to make a (real) TCP connection back to one of his computers, and a number of automated attacks launched against targets it considered particularly suspect (for example, if there was evidence of being logged into a known member twitter account). I.e., it wasn't actually a list of suspects, it was bait to build a list of suspects. I think he did the same trick with QR codes later.

Comment Re:Halfway There (Score 1) 326

Apparently I missed the part of this story where these manufacturers are trying to take your guns.

And on that subject, how many people have you guys turned out to the polls every time warning that the Democrats were with some imminent plan to take all your guns the second they take office? How did that turn out? Apparently I missed the massive seizure of privately owned weapons that you guys are constantly talking about.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 1) 245

A less-contrived example would be when the person cutting the lock is legally authorized to do so. For example, someone leaves the lock (with or without a bicycle) locked to the rail of a handicap-access ramp, or some other place that it isn't allowed to be, and at some point a city employee is tasked to remove the lock. When (s)he does so, (s)he gets gassed. I don't think that would play well from a legal standpoint.

Comment Re:Competing theories (Score 3) 310

Here's some past examples of True Pundit "journalism" for you.

  * Clinton secretly wearing mini stealth earbud to receive answers from her team during the debate

  * Clinton was using secret hand signals to tell Lester Holt what to say

  * Claims Clinton had a medical issue during the debate and Trump mouthed the word "Seizure"

  * Offers a $1m reward (as if a website like True Pundit has $1m) for Clinton's medical records, suggesting that she has "dementia, post-concussion syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, brain tumor, brain injury, complex partial seizures, and/or many more alleged ailments" and is followed by a doctor disguised as a Secret Service agent carrying an autoinjector of diazepam.

Comment Re: Wikileaks is a toxic organisation. (Score 3, Insightful) 310

Um, have you seen their Twitter feed lately? It's a nonstop feed of anti-Clinton propaganda, half of it retweets, a lot of the claims so bad that even Wikileaks supporters on the Wikileaks Reddit sub have been calling them out on it. It's morphed into Breitbart.

They're even repeating Trump's "rigged election" lines:

There is no US election. There is power consolidation. Rigged primary, rigged media and rigged 'pied piper' candidate drive consolidation.

Comment Re:easily made up in peripherals. (Score 1) 485

Speaking as an admin, the number of mac users that request elegant peripherals is not trivial.

No doubt, but a business is allowed to say 'no' to those requests, if it feels it's not worth the money to buy the elegant peripherals.

I imagine a lot of businesses probably don't care though, since compared to their ongoing salary costs, the cost of an occasional frou-frou trackpad is rounding error. If a one-time $80 purchase makes a $3000/week employee happier and/or more productive, why not?

Comment Re:Were the users randomized? (Score 1) 485

Tried that. It didn't work because the technically inept parent still had just as much problem with the Apple product. It turns out that you can't idiot proof something.

Sometimes you gotta up the dose. If a Mac isn't simple enough, switch them to an iPad. If they can't handle the iPad, then there's no hope, you'll need to migrate them back to pen-and-paper.

Comment Re:Were the users randomized? (Score 1) 485

it's a hidden cost that is virtually impossible to tally on a spreadsheet: your productivity is lost while you fix that problem. Did it take you an hour, where a tech might have taken 10 minutes?

Not really an issue at my employer, where the IT department will always take at least 48 hours to respond, followed by an additional 8 hours to diagnose, only to conclude that my Mac "must have come down with a virus" and recommend that I reinstall Windows on it.

(only mostly kidding)

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