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Comment Retail Hell, More Proof Cats Are Better Than Dogs! (Score 1) 117

There's a reason people that own one cat go crazy and have brain damage and end up owning more of those things.

The Toxoplasma Gondii requires cats to multiply, so it alters the behavior of its host rodents in order to steer them towards a cat's digestive system.

Now, humans and cats have lived together for millenia; it makes perfect sense that the Toxoplasma Gondii might also have steered us into giving their furry brothels a comfortable place in our homes and our beds... And for the cats, they have two species directly feeding them: Mice and Men. Perfect case of symbiotic evolution.

You'll never see Lassie do anything that smart.

Now, back to the parent post about working at PetSmart:

I've seen coworkers that were normal before become irritable and irrational after getting a cat.

Are you sure that's not just caused by working retail for long enough?

And then there was me, working at Home Depot, wearing the trademark Orange Apron. We had a cat in the store; it ate the mice that lived on the birdseed in the Seasonal Department. As I walked into the lunchroom, about 30 people eating lunch, big shift change time of day...

"Hey Lawrence! I hear you found the store cat!"

"Well, I found part of the store cat..."

Comment Re:Other way? (Score 1) 117

Does mental illness lead to owning a cat, though?

Being a crack dealer seems to lead to owning a pit bull, so why not?

Given the above, I'm proud to be a cat person. We must be nuts... why else would we put up with an egotistical, narcissistic, impatient, violent, snobby creature in our homes?

Better to have such a creature in my home than in the White House.

Comment Misty Water-Colored Memories... Slashdot Oldtimers (Score 1) 74

Great printer, those old Panasonics. Fast, clean, quiet, durable. Also loved the Epson MX-80 and the Okidata ML320.

I had a DEC LA-36 teletype (nb. not a TeleType) attached to my TI-99/4A back in the day... its 7 pin printhead lacked true descenders, so the print matched the text on the TI-99/4A's screen!

By the time I got to the Amiga 1000 and 500, I had a hand-me-down HP LaserJet I. What a tank. A Canon photocopier with HP's modifications, and doubled as a great ozone generator. The printer was connected to the Amiga by a 300 or 1200 baud RS-232 link. Annoyingly, I couldn't print anything from the BBSes while I was online - the Amiga's single serial port was needed for the modem. :)

Nowadays, there's a Unix mainframe in my right front pocket. And I can wirelessly print to a Samsung color laser printer that's 10x faster and 1/4 the weight. Don't even get me started on that Chromecast thing that's smaller than a videocassette and faster than a drive to Blockbuster.

But I do miss the quality of the old stuff. The old HP LaserJet just happened to be the very first (shared with the Apple LaserWriter) of its kind. Cost-reduction was not a goal; quality was. And it showed.

I miss HP.

Nice to meet another Slashdot old-timer...

Comment Re:Unix-like directories and Go whining? Stop it. (Score 1) 53

Well Brian, to wrap your head around things you can relate to, better toss that MacBook you authored your article on (BSD-variant and Unix-like directory structure), stop watching Netflix (hosted on Linux and some distributed POSIX-friendly Unix-like filesystem), don't put anything on Dropbox anymore (hosted on Linux and some distributed POSIX-friendly Unix-like filesystem). Get my point? Stop whining. Just because it's over your head, doesn't mean it's not over anyone elses.

Also, try using the web with URLs like http:\\backslashdot.org\ to avoid the Unixy feel.

Comment Re:The usual 2 Windows10 questions: (Score 1) 74

Telemetry is not spyware.

I beg to differ. In fact, places that deal with HIPAA and PCI compliance rules have to be crazy-OCD about this sort of stuff. On paper, it would seem that the mandatory telemetry could easily violate these regulations, and Microsoft refuses to give assurance or proof otherwise.

Windows is racing Apple to see which can become wholly unsuitable in an enterprise environment first.

What a load of bullshit. I have hundreds of HIPAA and PCI systems in my enterprise and Windows 10 never even comes up in the discussions with the compliance people. Stop making shit up just to fucking hate on Windows 10.

Comment Re:Too many cores. (Score 1) 72

They've taken a crappy, underpowered chip that was trimmed to the bone to try and make something that competes with Arm, and are hacking on extras to make it sound more like a Xeon.

So it's like taking Pentium 3 and hacking on extras from Pentium 4 (the actual innovations around the core, not the GHz race) to make Pentium M, then putting several of these on a single die to make the Core series? Not a bad idea.

Or could this be Intel's trick, that they've taken a Core 2 Mobile CPU, scraped off the Penryn label, reprinted it as Atom++, and are shipping those?

I think this already happened a while ago, in a way. For instance, the original Atoms didn't have out-of-order execution, but the later ones do: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... It looks a bit like the Pentium brand that lives on as the low end of Cores.

BTW, I have one of the earlier in-order Atoms running happily in a server-ish machine where GPUs do all the heavy lifting. It's perfect for the job, and I guess more Atom cores would be great for a lot of server tasks, at least given enough I/O. Ideally, something like ARM or MIPS would probably be even better, but good luck finding (a) a suitable mobo with all the PCIe slots and (b) AMD/Nvidia binary drivers.

Comment Re:Some hints (Score 1) 118

(1) If you are near sighted (which I am), have your the prescription *slightlt* detuned, so it isn't perfect. Mine is detuned by I think around 0.25. This reduces eye strain by a HUGE amount. You won't be able to read highway signs from far away but who needs to do that any more with gps nav?

Ah, I was just posting about this below, so let me ask: why not have separate glasses for computer work?

Comment What about optical power? (Score 3, Informative) 118

I'm myopic, and I often read books without glasses, but the computer screen is a little too far for that. So I sometimes find it easier to use my old glasses for computing, compared to my regular glasses with a stronger correction. Around here, "computer glasses"* refer to glasses with the optical power optimized for screen distances. It's something you can get from your employer as a health benefit if you work at a screen all day.

I also use redshift on Linux to tone down the blues (the colour component) during the night, but it's a completely orthogonal issue. Plus if you're worried about computing ruining your sleep, there's also the psychological buzz, so I'm not sure which one dominates in practice.

*(One common term is "päätelasit" meaning "terminal glasses", not necessarily because you're so old they're the last glasses you'll ever need, but because our computing term-inology is ancient and we still think in terms of terminals.)

Comment Re:Agile! (Score 1) 74

When agile is done correctly you are right. But agile, like socialism, is always "perfect world" scenario stuff.

To be fair Capitalism is also a "perfect world" scenario. You can paint it red (communism) or blue (capitalism), but what we have in reality is the very same modernized Feudalism.

No, capitalism is self correcting. Capitalism acknowledges flaws but allows for markets to fix them. Socialism does not, can not and will not do so. What you're talking about is crony capitalism which is a mix of capitalism and socialism where government picks winners and losers.

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