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Submission + - Scott Adams and "The Non-Expert Problem" (blogspot.ca) 8

Layzej writes: It is easy for a non-expert to be swayed by a credible sounding narrative that claims to overthrow a scientific consensus. For a scientist it is generally clear which arguments are valid, but the general public can’t independently evaluate scientific evidence. Scientist Victor Venema provides answers to a number of concerns about climate science raised by cartoonist Scott Adams. His answers are accessible and illuminating, and hopefully helpful to the non-expert who would like to understand the truth behind certain contrarian talking points.

Comment Re:A perfect Christmas gift... (Score 1) 180

Nordstrom is late to the party.

The De Beers propoganda slave-labor cartel has been scamming suckers for years selling overpriced rocks when in 1939 they kicked their marketing campaign in high gear. i.e. Only an idiot would pay $100 million for a De Beers Centenary Diamond

You know what they say: A fool and his money are soon parted.

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Region Locking IS Price Fixing

Submission + - FOIA confirms existence of real-life X-Files that FBI previously denied existed (muckrock.com)

v3rgEz writes: A Freedom of Information Act request for FBI files on a figure at the center of dozens of 20th century conspiracy theories reveals a rare glimpse into the Bureau's real-life "X-Files" — which the agency had long maintained don't exist. And while there's no evidence yet of Mulder or Scully, the files do include a story of flying saucers and secret assassins stranger than anything on the show.

Comment Re:Provide this at the state level (Score 0) 276

Here's my homework, teacher: Article 1, section 8: Congress may lay and collect taxes for the "common defense" or "general welfare" of the United States.

This does not equate to a power to spend tax money on (or regulate) anything "for the 'common defense' or 'general welfare'". If Congress's enumerated powers included getting involved in education, this clause would grant them the power to raise money toward that end. It does not grant that power by itself. If it did, the remainder of the section (and the entire concept of enumerated powers) would be rendered meaningless, which was obviously not the authors' or signers' intent.

Don't worry, this is a very common mistake. Your reading comprehension will improve with practice. In the meantime, perhaps you would care to read what Thomas Jefferson and James Madison had to say on the subject.

Comment Re:Not Fed (Score 1) 276

Financially, Congress has the power to tax, borrow, pay debt and provide for the common defense and the general welfare.

You skipped some critical words and punctuation:

The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; ...

Notice the comma after "Excises"—these are two separate lists, not a single broad power. The power described here is simply "To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises". That's it: to collect money, not to spend it. The purpose of that power is described by the next phrase, "to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States". That is merely clarifying language, tacked on to explain why the money is being collected and not intended to grant any additional powers. In other words, the nature of this power is merely to fund the enumerated powers given by the remainder of the section. If this sentence alone were intended to authorize absolutely anything which might be argued to "provide for the common Defense and general Welfare" then the remainder of the section would be superfluous. That (false) interpretation does away with the entire concept of enumerated powers. The authors and signers obviously did not intend for the enumeration of powers granted to Congress to be superfluous, or Section 8 would have ended immediately after the words "general Welfare".

Don't just take my word for it, though. Consider instead the writings of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison on the subject.

Comment Re:It was a joke to begin with (Score 1) 276

When the time comes to start specializing in something (i.e. choosing a major in college), they will have a good idea of what subjects they enjoy and have an aptitude for. That's where they'll pick up the math and analytical skills and other foundational stuff.

Math and analytical skills are foundational skills for far more than just computer programming, and ought to be taught long before the student enters college. It is undeniably true that not every student needs to be trained as a large-system software developer, but everyone should learn at least the most basic fundamentals of computer design, both practical and theoretical, and more importantly the problem-solving skills such as abstract thinking, divide-and-conquer, proofs, etc. which are necessary to understand how complex systems function, including—but not limited to—software. Introductory computer coding is one context in which these skills can be taught, so long as it is recognized as a means to an end and not the end itself.

Comment Re:too much segmentation (Score 1) 158

1. Agreed that this greed over licensing only harms consumers.

/Oblg. Clueless exec is clueless:

"If you were passionate (about a movie), you've already seen it," he said.

Gee, isn't that precisely the problem in the first place !!! Netflix is so late to the party that they are becoming so irrelevant due to lack of content that they are having a hard time get new subscribers.

This artificial time-delayed release (movie theater first, cable second, streaming third) IS precisely the problem caused by greed over licensing.

2. The study is flawed. How about letting users TAG _which_ content they WANT To see but can't. Then you would actually have relevant data. The study is akin to asking "Which numbers do you like?"

* 2
* 4
* 8

And then going "See, no one likes odd numbers!"

WTF.

You're only sampling PART of the data!

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Region Locking IS price fixing.

Comment Re: Unfortunately no and I have a reason (Score 1) 376

Yes, he should go back and update his book with _actual_, popular, assembly languages. Using _practical_ languages means a student doesn't learn some obscure language that no one gives a fuck about but can _apply_ their skills immediately.

Also, by learning _multiple_ assembly languages the student doesn't pigeon-holed into myopic thinking. By being exposed to multiple languages they see how different design and implementation trade-offs were made.

The day of professors inventing yet-another-language are over. You can teach Theory AND Application, not just "my pet theory".

Comment Re:Maybe, I should sue KDE? (Score 1) 121

> KDE3's tech had reached a dead-end, there was no way forward there, to keep building a new base was needed. KDE4 had to happen,

WIMP (Windows, Icons, Menu, Pointer) has been around since 1980 .. yeah, the 80's -- over 30 years.

Design and Implementation a GUI isn't rocket science -- WTF are people doing that they are constantly hacking SO much SHIT into it that they need to throw the whole thing away and start again from scratch?!?!

Comment Re:Unfortunately no and I have a reason (Score 1) 376

> More like pseudo-assembly than high-level pseudo-code.

It is actually worse then that. You learn some bullshit imaginary assembly language MMIX, instead of a pragmatic real assembly language like 6502, x86, or ARM which you could have immediately tried out. And while an assembler and debugger exist for MMIX this is yet more time you need to waste on some obscure, niche, proprietary language and toolchain.

That said, what The Art of Computer Programming lacks in quality it makes up in quantity.

> and understood it right away from CLR

100% agree that Introduction to Algorithms is a fantastic book! It definitely is on the "short list" of every books a computer programmer should own.

Submission + - How Windows 10's data collection trades your privacy for Microsoft's security (pcworld.com)

jader3rd writes: PCworld has an article on how Microsoft uses Windows 10 telemetry to improve the security of the end user:



But the telemetry data is used for more than how to improve or evolve Windows. There is an actual security impact, too. Knowledge is power, and in the case of Windows 10, that usage data lets Microsoft beef up threat protection, says Rob Lefferts, Microsoft’s director of program management for Windows Enterprise and Security.

The information collected is used to improve various components in Windows Defender, such as Application Guard and Advanced Threat Detection (these two features are available only to customers with Windows 10 Enterprise with Anniversary Update and Enterprise E5 subscriptions). As Windows 10’s built-in security tool, Windows Defender uses real-time protection to scan everything downloaded or run on the PC. The information from these scans is sent back to Microsoft and used to improve protection for everyone else.


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