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Comment Change the name to "Crash Supersonic"? (Score 2) 44

"... marketing geniuses..."

Apparently a lot of technically-knowledgeable people don't have social ability. Boom Supersonic!!! "Boom" is what you hear when there is a crash.

There are many more like that. For example, Malwarebytes is software named after the problem it is supposed to cure. Doesn't anyone at BOOM have a mother?

Son: Mom, what do you think of the name BOOM for our company?

Mom: No, son, that's not a good name.

Son: Why not?

Mom: You're only 3 years old. You'll understand when you are 4.

Submission + - An Unexpected New Lung Function Has Been Found - They Make Blood (sciencealert.com)

schwit1 writes: Researchers have discovered that the lungs play a far more complex role in mammalian bodies than we thought, with new evidence revealing that they don't just facilitate respiration — they also play a key role in blood production.

In experiments involving mice, the team found that they produce more than 10 million platelets (tiny blood cells) per hour, equating to the majority of platelets in the animals' circulation. This goes against the decades-long assumption that bone marrow produces all of our blood components.

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco also discovered a previously unknown pool of blood stem cells that makes this happen inside the lung tissue — cells that were incorrectly assumed to mainly reside in bone marrow.

"This finding definitely suggests a more sophisticated view of the lungs — that they're not just for respiration, but also a key partner in formation of crucial aspects of the blood," says one of the researchers, Mark R. Looney.

Submission + - Call for the security of the Electronic Voting Machine (EVM) to be tested

An anonymous reader writes: The IT minister of the Indian state of Karnataka has called for a hackathon for testing the electronic voting machines (EVMs) used in the recent elections in India.

In the elections in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, BJP, the party which is presently in power in the centre, won with a huge majority. Some from the opposition parties have argued that the EVMs may have been tampered with.

Narendra Modi, the present Prime Minister of India, was accused of using non-authoirzed EVMs in 2010 during the local elections in the state of Gujarat while he was a chief minister there. The EVMs were shown to be giving incorrect results.

In an earlier research done in 2010 by researchers from NetIndia, University of Michigan and a non-profit in Netherlands specializing in electronic voting related issues, the security of the electronic voting machines was found to be inadequate.

Submission + - Windows 10 forced upgrades spark legal action

AmiMoJo writes: Three people in Illinois have filed a lawsuit against Microsoft, claiming that its Windows 10 update destroyed their data and damaged their computers. The complaint, filed in Chicago's US District Court on Thursday, charges that Microsoft Windows 10 is a defective product and that its maker failed to provide adequate warning about the potential risks posed by Windows 10 installation – specifically system stability and data loss. The attorneys representing the trio are seeking to have the case certified as a class action that includes every person in the US who upgraded to Windows 10 from Windows 7 and suffered data loss or damage to software or hardware within 30 days of installation. They claim there are hundreds or thousands of affected individuals. Last June, a California woman won $10,000 after a Windows 10 update disabled her PC.

Comment Re:Not hard to fix... (Score 2) 437

The problem is that it requires a Republican Congress to vote in favor of something that lets corporations get away with being stingy. Trump might decide to support it because he doesn't like Silicon Valley, but I can't imagine a Republican Congress siding with the little guy when it comes to money.

Submission + - Microsoft Posts 'No Boys Allowed' Signs at State of RI High School CS Event 4

theodp writes: "Girls and women are half of the world's population," Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo told hundreds of high school girls gathered behind doors with signs that read "[Microsoft] DigiGirlz: No Boys Allowed". "They are half of the world’s brains, problem-solvers, leaders. This world cannot solve problems unless they are at the table. That’s why I started programs like CS4RI, partnering with Microsoft and other leaders [including Microsoft-backed Code.org] to offer computer science in every Rhode Island school." Raimondo also noted she was dismayed to learn that only 12 of Rhode Island's 42 students who took the AP Computer Science test were girls (RI has 43,000+ enrolled HS students). The best way to make girls feel welcome in K-12 CS education, some influence-wielding tech giants, politicians, and educators seem to agree, is by making boys even more unwelcome via things like gender-based federal K-12 CS education funding; girls-only learn-to-code initiatives, STEM schools and summer computer camps; and gender-weighted teacher incentive programs from Google and tech-backed Code.org (Google and the U.S. Government even sought to exclude boys from programming White House Christmas tree lights in 2014).

Submission + - Why You Should Care About The Supreme Court Case On Toner Cartridges (consumerist.com)

rmdingler writes: A corporate squabble over printer toner cartridges doesn’t sound particularly glamorous, and the phrase “patent exhaustion” is probably already causing your eyes to glaze over. However, these otherwise boring topics are the crux of a Supreme Court case that will answer a question with far-reaching impact for all consumers: Can a company that sold you something use its patent on that product to control how you choose to use after you buy it?

Here’s the background: Lexmark makes printers. Printers need toner in order to print, and Lexmark also happens to sell toner.

Then there’s Impression Products, a third-party company makes and refills toner cartridges for use in printers, including Lexmark’s.

Comment Re:This! (Score 1) 126

Not going to lie, I miss keepass and its autotype function. I tried to mock something up with xdotool but never really worked right.

That is mostly what I did, though instead of a thumb drive I just used git to keep some copies around...though, on windows I just used scp because I had trouble with git-annex. I never trusted thumb drives that much. I have lost data from them and if a backup procedure is too manual, I know I wont follow it.

Then I bought a yubikey, and the more I looked at it, the more attractive the password-store model was. Worst case scenario, the only tools I really need are ssh, git, and opengpg. The only backup data, aside from my multiply-replicated repo is my restoration keyring, which can be copied to several USB sticks and is valid for potentially a decade or more. I can toss one in a bank safe deposit box (and some day I will get around to doing that!)

You CAN setup a yubikey in OTP mode with keepass via a plugin, but, OTP mode is suboptimal and could be very problematic if you have sync/backup issues.

Comment Re:This! (Score 1) 126

1. Yes but, you can have many git servers. Each repo is a full copy so central repos are basically throwaway. Lose one, make a new one, push to it.

2. The amount of available resources is amazing but, still, nobody cracks gpg encrypted files, nobody is dumb enough to try. Keeping up with the tool chain and updating keys every few years as the recomendations and capabilities change should do you fine.

generally the weak point anyone would assault a gpg based setup is either key storage or end point usage.

Nothing will stop a malware you don't know about from scraping the decrypted passwords as you decrypt them. If you store keys locally in an exportable form and type the decryption passphrase, then it can all be stolen by maleware as well.

However, if you store subkeys on hardware that can't export them, and requires a touch, so it can't be used as an oracle easily.... then the best they can do is that.

In this scheme each password has its own decryption session key, and that key is the only sensitive data that the hardware key works with. At best they get one message at a time, as you use them; and that requires that they own your endpoint in some way.

Comment Re:This! (Score 1) 126

In a twisted way it makes sense. File loss is more common a problem than actual compromise. This absolves them of needing to offer a solution.

Personally I ditched even keepass for password store because it solves this by supporting git for sync.

Its cross platform, uses gnupg in the back end, meaning no custom encryption code and a well known, trusted code base. Plus, because it is gpg based, all but a couple of special snowflake implementations natively get the benefit of hardware keys that gpg supports.

Since the gpg keys can be used as ssh keys, the whole process becomes seamless.

Submission + - EFF needs your help to stop Congress dismantling Internet privacy protections! (eff.org)

Peter Eckersley writes: Last year the FCC passed rules forbidding ISPs (both mobile and landline) from using your personal data without your consent for purposes other than providing you Internet access. In other words, the rules prevent ISPs from turning your browsing history into a revenue stream to sell to marketers and advertisers. Unfortunately, members of Congress are scheming to dismantle those protections as early as this week. If they succeed, ISPs would be free to resume selling users' browsing histories, pre-loading phones with spyware, and generally doing all sorts of creepy things to your traffic.

The good news is, we can stop them. We especially need folks in the key states of Alaska, Colorado, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, and Pennsylvania to call their senators this week and tell them not to kill the FCC's Broadband Privacy Rules.

Together, we can stop Congress from undermining these crucial privacy protections.

Comment Operational inertia (Score 1) 301

Companies that inspire turnover but are otherwise stable collect cruft from employees who are competent enough to not be fired, through whatever means, but not talented or crafty enough to have options.

Short term this bloats the organization, as more people are required to accomplish the same tasks, but long term, limits the ability of the company to do anything or change tactics - gaining more and more inertial mass.

This is just a perturbation that moves IBM along that chain.

I accepted a job offer from IBM in the 90's after going through their lengthy and involved interview process.I didn't make it to my first day as the reams of paperwork I had to fill out before ever setting foot in the door were terrifying.

You can fight change or embrace it. IBM's competitors will be more agile. It's pretty clear that the future will be dominated by distributed teams with the absolute best people for the problem set working on it, almost certainly in a remote fashion. I'm writing on a computer's who's operating system was done in just sort of a fashion...

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