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Submission + - Cesarean births *possibly* affecting human evolution 1

CanadianRealist writes: Larger babies delivered by cesarean section may be affecting human evolution. Researchers estimate cases where the baby cannot fit down the birth canal have increased from 30 in 1,000 in the 1960s to 36 in 1,000 births today. (Science Alert and ( BBC "this is happening headline" version.)

More detailed studies would be required to actually confirm the link between C-sections and evolution, as all we have now is a hypothesis based on the birth data.

Agreed, more studies required part. Cesareans may simply be becoming more common with “too large” defined as cesarean seems like a better idea. It's reasonable to pose the question based simply on an understanding of evolution. Like it's reasonable to conjecture that length of human pregnancy is a compromise between further development in utero, and chance of mother and baby surviving the delivery.

Comment Re:meh, totally predictable plot lines (Score 1) 76

Yeah, I forgot a lot of good ones. Sharks, eels, piranhas, snakes, volcanoes, rising water on sinking ships, asteroids, robots, machines on the blink, doomsday devices, heat, cold, incompetent technicians, ghosts, time travellers, parties unknown, mad scientists, angry scientists, monsters created by mad/angry scientists, radiation monsters, diseases, ... It's kind of fun to think through the list.

And then there's the *real* villians: bad actors, bad directors, bad screenplays, bad ideas, ruining good books, bad soundtracks, theatres that set the sound too loud, people that talk during the movie, people that use electronics during the movie, people that talk to their electronics during the movie, spoilers, overpriced tickets, overpriced snacks, commercials, product placement deals, cameos by overrated actors, actors that are in too many movies, sequels, prequels, remakes, reboots, retcons.

Comment Re:meh, totally predictable plot lines (Score 4, Insightful) 76

If it's from Hollywood, post 1968, then:

1. The villain will be a US military agency, a US spy agency, a corporation/CEO, a gun company, a non-renewable energy company.

Wow, I must have misunderstood the plot on all those post-1968 movies where I thought the baddies were commies, nazis, drug lords, foreign terrorists, domestic terrorists, anarchists, poor people trying to get rich quick, rich people trying to get richer quick, crazy people trying to do incomprehensible things for incomprehensible reasons, wayward do-gooders, megalomoniacal supercrooks, pirates, pirate hunters, aliens, alien hunters, vampires, vampire hunters, zombies, orcs, dragons, ghosts, etc.

If you don't like the simulation you're living in, you can always rejoin us here in reality.

Submission + - Al Gore has "an extremely interesting conversation" with Trump (bbc.com)

tomhath writes: Mr Gore told reporters he met Ivanka before his meeting with her father.

"The bulk of the time was with the president-elect, Donald Trump. I found it an extremely interesting conversation, and to be continued," Mr Gore said.

Mr Trump has been stocking his administration with conservative ideologues, and many of the possible names for his environmental posts are sceptical of current policy. If Ms Trump pushes the issue and Mr Gore continues his "extremely interesting conversation" with the president, however, this could become a test of how willing President Trump is to cross party orthodoxy.

A free-agent president — beholden to neither party and willing to strike deals according to his own fancy — may be exactly what his voters wanted and what Washington insiders fear.

Submission + - What To Do If You Need To Learn To Code To Keep Your Job (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: Karen Wickre has survived the highs and lows of Silicon Valley’s kingmakers, working everywhere from Twitter to Google, and now, she's taking her years of workplace savvy and applying it to her new gig as Backchannel's advice columnist. In this edition of the Help Desk: what to do if you're being told you need to learn to code to keep your job; how to handle being leveled down; and what to do when your manager is taking all of the credit for your entire team's work.

Comment Re:Law works for wealthy people... (Score 1) 367

"BMW Assist" is basically a knock-off of GM's "OnStar". I wouldn't be too surprised if stories like this are happening all the time with less pricey cars. Anytime there is a stolen car with GPS and a communications link, police are going to make a serious attempt to find the car and grab the thief. Locking the scumbag inside the car is just an added bonus.

Comment Re:Init alternatives (Score 1) 329

In my experience, Slackware is a lot (very noticeably) faster than Fedora on the same HW. I don't know whether it is due to systemd or SELinux or something else entirely, but if you need raw speed, then you seriously should consider going back to basics.

Fedora would have been well served by following Debian's DashAsBinSh project back in the day. Post-kernel boot times might have been cut by up to a half or so, thus dulling the argument for systemd to begin with.

Comment Re:Init alternatives (Score 1) 329

It isn't so much that "old is bad" as that the new is more likely to have been designed with modern paradigms in mind. Despite your dismissal, parallelism in particular is important, especially as Linux has taken a role as the embedded OS of choice for smart devices and cheap laptops.

Linux was succeeding quite well in the non-RTOS embedded space and with cheap hardware long before systemd came around. And an embedded device (aka, an appliance) is precisely where you want the MOST deterministic functioning. You don't just randomly through a bunch of parallelized shit in there and hope systemd all figures it out for you.

The fact remains that the previous init harness was perfectly reasonable. People that needed service management, socket launching, and other functions had options in daemontools, inetd/xinetd, runit, and myriad other tools out there, while rc (on BSD) or the chkconfig-controlled symlinks in rc.d gave structured sanity to the set of deterministic instructions a machine needed at boot.

Systemd's writers forcefully shoved all that aside in favor of a one-size-fits-all strategy that people had to accept whether they liked it or not, and once it was in place, they did everything they could to burn the bridges back to other paradigms.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Where did member ~KGIII (973947) Go ??? (slashdot.org)

Bob_Who writes: KGIII (973947) last posted a comment on Slashdot on May 11, 2016.

Since that time, I have no clue whatsoever why KGIII (or the alias) has completely disappeared.

Does anyone have any idea if KGIII is alive??

Or in the big house? ....or looking down from the even bigger house ..... or has simply quit Slashdot and never looked back???

Its been a long while without a peep from profoundly lucid participant.

Anyone near Maine or Cuba or other place where KGIII may be lurking perhaps? I've been worried for months...

Comment Re:Based Gentoo (Score 1) 329

yay gentoo! Its very easy to avoid that systemd garbage. I'm not just bandwagoning here, I have to setup RHEL7 for a very large company because they wanted to stay with RedHat. It was hell on wheels. RHEL7.1 was a slight improvement but still not enough to ever consider it again.

I would kill for a systemd-free rebuild of RHEL, but it doesn't seem like there's enough of a push to be able to make it happen with some sort of plausible enterprise ability. It wouldn't be that hard -- basically take RHEL7 and stick RHEL6's initscripts and startup system onto it -- but it wouldn't be "EL7", which is important.

A systemd-free version of Fedora is tricker, if only because LP and friends have succeeded in burning as many bridges as possible within the base install away from any other init paradigm. Good job, guys. I hope you rot.

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