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Comment Re:Morons (Score 1) 202

you don't think having substantial female characters is important?

There are very few substantial characters of ANY gender or race in Hollywood movies. You fix that with better writers, not some silly software. Leave it to Silicon Valley idiots to think software is the solution for EVERYTHING.

"We need to build a house. Grab that hammer and let's get started."

"Um....can't I just build an app for it?"

"No idiot, an app won't build a house."

"But what if it's a REALLY GOOD app?"

Comment Re:Worst part... (Score 1) 90

As part of the strict scientific nature of this rigorous experiment to get us closer to a manned mission to Mars, participants were limited to only ordering pizza no more than once a day, and only allowed to leave the facility when they couldn't find a sitter and on family movie night. They were also under strict orders to pretend the gravity was two-thirds lower.

Comment Re:It's Sony - duh (Score 1) 371

Bullshit as from all reports it would take quite a bit of time to get towards the center (where the devs said in interview after interview was where all the faction system and battles would be taking place) only to find...its not there, its all been ripped out or was straight up vaporware.

At the end of the day? No Man's Sky is fraud, plain and simple. in interview after interview, some being given mere DAYS before release they touted features that did not exist and showed content that simply did not exist in game. Since the game has procedurally generated worlds? Its quite possible you get started on some shit world where it takes dozens of hours to gather the resources required to get really up and running just to find out all those features, the faction system, big space battles, planets where you have day/night cycles and weather based on its place in the system, an economy where you can be a trader or miner or make runs for various factions....they just do not exist.

A the end of the day I see NO difference between this and Aliens:Colonial Marines. In both cases you had devs showing content that didn't exist, hyped features that didn't exist, and the footage shown turned out to be bullshit. Sorry but they deserve a refund if they ask for it because at the end of the day what was shown and what they got? Couldn't be more opposite.

Comment CAD licence (Score 1) 223

The funny thing about humans is that different humans care about different things. (Perhaps this signal becomes harder to detect as an Act III BDFL of a sprawling monoculture.)

If you regard your code as a means to an end (e.g. authoring a great web site) then perhaps it's a perfectly reasonable stance not to "care" about your code the way Linus cares about his code.

Licence of the day: Craftspeople with Attachment Disorder. Be there, or be square.

Submission + - Obamacare exchange sign-ups fall FAR SHORT of forecasts... (washingtonpost.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Enrollment in the insurance exchanges for President Obama’s signature health-care law is at less than half the initial forecast, pushing several major insurance companies to stop offering health plans in certain markets because of significant financial losses.

In other Obamacare news ...
Obamacare insurance market near collapse in Tennessee, state official says
one-third of U.S will have no health insurance choices
Aetna, the nation’s third largest health insurer and faced with $300 million in loses, has decided against expanding its participation in the Obamacare exchanges. They also announced that they are re-evaluating their entire participation in the remaining exchanges.

Obamacare rates are likely to go up from 23% to 45% in Illinois, and 17.3% in Michigan.
Humana, one of the nation’s largest heathcare companies, has decided to leave almost half of its Obamacare markets next year.
Health insurance rates on the Obamacare exchange in California will rise 13% next year.
Presbyterian Health Plan, a major insurer in the New Mexico marketplace, has announced that it will be dropping out of the Obamacare exchange next year.
Oregon’s Health CO-OP in folded July
Within three months of signing up for Obamacare more than 13%, or 1.6 million people, in 2016 have dropped coverage by not paying their premiums.
Blue Cross Blue Shield is losing money in states across the nation, forcing them to request rate increases of more than 50 to 65 percent.
Almost a hundred thousand Coloradans are about to lose their health insurance because of Obamacare.
Ohio’s Obamacare co-op announced in June that it is shutting down, making it the 13 of 23 co-ops to fail.

Submission + - Retailers bending refund policies for unhappy No Man's Sky players. (tweaktown.com)

thegarbz writes: As was covered previously on Slashdot the very hyped up game No Man's Sky was released with to a lot of negative reviews about game crashing bugs and poor interface choices. Now that plays have had more time to play the game it has become clear that many of the features hyped by developers are not present in the game, and users quickly started describing the game as "boring".

Now, likely due to misleading advertising, Steam has begun allowing refunds for No Man's Sky regardless of playtime, and there are reports of players getting refunds on the Play Station Network as well despite Sony's strict no refund policy.

Comment Re:Logic Says It Should Be Legal (Score 2) 363

There's also no reason that autoinjectors could not be modified to have some of the useful properties of regular syringes. For example, if part of the case of the autoinjector were transparent, users would be able to see how much of the drug remained just as with a syringe and thereby avoid partial doses.

Submission + - Sheriff's Raid to Find Blogger Who Criticized Him Ruled Unconstitutional (theintercept.com)

schwit1 writes: An appellate court in Baton Rouge ruled Thursday that a raid on a police officer’s house in search of the blogger who had accused the sheriff of corruption was unconstitutional.

The Louisiana First Circuit Court of Appeals argued that Sheriff Jerry Larpenter’s investigation into the blog ExposeDAT had flawed rationale: the alleged defamation was not actually a crime as applied to a public official.

The unanimous ruling from the three-judge panel comes after police officer Wayne Anderson and his wife Jennifer Anderson were denied assistance in local and federal court.

Submission + - VA Invests in Failed Solar Projects, Veterans Linger on Wait List (heartland.org)

An anonymous reader writes: The Department of Veteran's Affairs Inspector General has found the VA wasted millions on solar panel installations that don't work.

Evidently, the Veteran's Administration (VA), does not have enough money to hire new doctors or take other actions to reduce wait times and improve treatment for our nation's military veterans, but it does have money to spend installing solar panels at its facilities, according by the VA's Inspector General (IG) detailed by the Washington Free Beacon.

While the VA has been under fire for wasting federal dollars as veterans’ wait times and other failings have persisted at VA medical facilities nationwide, the IG report reveals the VA spent more than $408 million to install solar panels on its medical facilities, yet many of the projects have experienced significant delays and cost overruns with some solar projects failing to function at all.

In a report issued August 3, 2016, the VA IG reported the VA had consistently failed to effectively plan and manage its solar panel projects, resulting in significant delays and additional costs. An audit of 11 of the 15 solar projects awarded between fiscal years 2010 and 2013, found only two of the 11 solar panel projects were fully completed.

Comment Re:More political redirection (Score 2) 535

Let's be pragmatic here. She didn't decide the logistics of her email server and how to secure it or delete emails. Her IT intern did this.

Let's be realistic here. She didn't tell her IT guy what tools to use. She didn't have to. Someone -- and it doesn't take too much intelligence to guess who -- gave a directive to make that server and all its contents disappear Jimmy Hoffa style. That directive was given only after the existence of the server became public knowledge and its contents were requested. Can guilt be proven by such an action? No. But can anyone make any remotely plausible, intelligent, cohesive argument as to why someone running for POTUS would knowingly put themselves in such an awkward, damaging position?

Clinton is no fool. She knew wiping the server after it was discovered would leave her open to charges of hiding things. The most plausible explanation of why she'd do this was because there were things on the server that were even more awkward and damaging.

Comment Re:More political redirection (Score 2) 535

Whether the secure wipe was used as a simple matter of Best Practice, or was done for Nefarious reasons, is not known. So when the article makes judgements such as "When you're using BleachBit, it is something you really do not want the world to see." it becomes a political mudslinging story.

What exactly is the purpose of BleachBit? As described on its own web page, BleachBit "tirelessly guards your privacy." It doesn't matter if it was wiped because of "best practices" (something rather laughable given that Sec. Clinton was violating the "best practices" of the very department she was head of according to the head of IT at SecState) or to hide nefarious activities. The main purpose of BleachBit is to preserve privacy by "obfuscating forensic evidence." The OP's statement was completely correct and made no judgments whatsoever about the guilt or innocence of Sec. Clinton. You're calling it mudslinging because you don't like the idea of people questioning her motives and wish to deflect attention.

Comment Re:massive parallel processing=limited application (Score 1) 112

On a 8-core machine, a processor will be placed into a wait queue roughly 7 out of 8 times that it needs access.

You just snuck into your analysis the assumption that every core is memory saturated, and I don't think that all the memory path aggregates in many designs until the L3 cache (usually L1 not shared, L2 perhaps shared a bit). The real bottleneck ends up being the cache coherency protocol, and cache snoop events, handled on a separate bus, which might even have concurrent request channels.

I think in Intel's Xeon E5 line-up there are single-ring and bridged double-ring SKUs for forwarding dirty cache lines from one cache to another (and perhaps all memory requests). This resource can also drown for many workloads.

In many systems, you have all these cores running tasks which are fairly well isolated (not much cache conflict), except they all want to be able to allocate as much memory as they need from a giant memory space (e.g. a TB of DRAM) so they fundamentally have to fall through to a shared memory allocation framework.

You can learn a lot about the challenges involved by following the winding path of something like jemalloc as increasing concurrency levels expose yet another degeneracy.

The real problem with this field is that there isn't a single, simple story like the one you tried to tell. There are usually dozens of ways to skin the cat, each with completely different scaling stories, with different sets of engineers who are good as tweaking or debugging those stories.

At this point, what you have is a fragile coordination problem between your solution space, your architecture, and the engineers you employ, forcing ambitious ventures to crack out the golden recipe: pour in seven cement mixers full of head hunters, one 55-gallon oil drum of exclamation marks, a metric butter tonne of job perks, and agitate appropriately.

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