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Comment Or the other reason.... (Score 1) 76

The fact the whole state is a river flood plain and only stupid people build homes in a river flood plain?

Global warming may have cause the weather pattern changes, but it does not change the fact that if you build in the low lands, you have to expect flooding because it will absolutely happen with a 100% guarantee.

Comment Next up... (Score 1) 129

Coming next: Facebook tests out modal popup windows as a means of delivering the content - aka ads - people really want to see, rather than wasting their time taking them directly to things like profiles, pictures, or their wall.

And as a bonus, pop-under porn ads, so you can enjoy one last bit of joy from Facebook while desperately trying to close out of your browser as the boss approaches.

Comment Re:Here's one example (Score 1) 187

I can think of a few more: the A-10 Thunderbolt II ("Warthog"), and a couple of WWII bombers. Not to mention various other airplanes made during the 50s-60s which are now retired. Back then, it seems they were able to go from a vague idea to an excellent military aircraft design in full production in 4 years, back when design had to be done on paper/vellum rather than CAD. These days it takes 15 years and the final product has all kinds of problems.

Comment Re:The US gov tried their best (Score 1) 187

I think another factor is that in private industry, you can jump around pretty easily if you're any good at all. Tired of the horrible upper management at your company? No problem, just start interviewing and get a new job. Your company drives itself into the ground (or just your division)? No problem, just go find a new job. Your pay is stagnant, and/or you're tired of the incompetence or the IT infrastructure at your job? Start looking. Of course, getting a new job isn't *that* easy, but in a tech hub with lots of openings for your skillset it's not that hard. But when you work for the government, there is no jumping around, not that easily, and you won't get a big pay raise for doing so (unless you defect to the private sector of course).

Submission + - Nearest Star Has Earth-sized Planet in its Habitable Zone (discovermagazine.com)

Flash Modin writes: In a shocking find, astronomers Wednesday announced their discovery of an Earth-sized planet orbiting the nearest star, Proxima Centauri, just 4.2 light-years away. This warm world, cataloged as Proxima b, sits smack in the middle of its habitable zone — the sweetest of sweet spots — where liquid surface water could exist. But Proxima Centauri is not like our sun. It’s a cool, low-mass star known as a red dwarf. So the planet only qualifies as potentially habitable because it circles its sun in an orbit tighter than Mercury’s.

Submission + - Initial results of CO pot legalization "tax for schools" pre-legislation hype

ofprimes writes: I live in Aurora, a suburb of Denver where we have a highly-rated school district (http://cherrycreekschools.org/Pages/default.aspx), and where recreational pot has been legalized. We live on the "outskirts" of Aurora and nearly next to farmland. Not long ago we had a murder at a pot shop less than a mile away from us (http://denver.cbslocal.com/2016/06/20/dispensary-owner-says-guards-murder-was-caught-on-video/), and that opened our eyes to unwanted effects of legalized marijuana, but now we received this email from the *Superintendant* the school district yesterday as we have two kids attending Cherry Creek schools. To add to the frustration of our rural-life completely changing (crime has increased in the Denver area — http://www.americanthinker.com...), but my wife works — as a volunteer — nearly full-time on the PTO doing fundraiser after fundraiser bringing in whatever cash they can to keep the schools current and bring in essential technology needed in these times of hi-tech. The schools are always strapped and if they want "modern" technology, they have to raise funds for it through various means.

Receiving this letter was infuriating because the only positive side (other than convenience) for legalizing marijuana was that this legalization would be a godsend for the schools and PTO teams who commit so much of their time for free, for the kids. I guess not.

---------------------------------------------------------------
August 23, 2016

From the Desk of the Superintendent
There’s no easy fix for the shortcomings in Colorado’s school financing system.

Since 2009, the state Legislature has taken liberties with the school funding formula mandated by the voter-approved Amendment 23, using the so-called “negative factor” to cut funding every year. The Legislature has relied on circuitous reasoning and intricate formulas to withhold crucial money from school districts across the state.

We’ve felt the impact of those cuts in the Cherry Creek School District. We’ve been underfunded by about $50 million annually. Since 2012, $380 million has been withheld from Cherry Creek. We’re facing a shortfall of more than $20 million for the 2017-2018 school year. These cuts have the potential to impact every facet of district operations, from recruiting new teachers to maintaining a reasonable class size.

It’s a crisis that’s tied to our fundamental priorities as Coloradans, one that won’t find an easy remedy from the state’s nascent marijuana industry. People keep asking me, ‘Where’s the pot money?’ The short answer is that the Cherry Creek School District hasn’t received any. The longer answer is about how the money actually is allocated.

The lead-up to the legalization of marijuana in 2012 brought plenty of rhetoric regarding the positive impact on public schools in Colorado. Voters were told that taxes on legal marijuana would prove to be a windfall for cash-strapped school districts; millions of dollars’ worth of education cuts from the state would be offset by new income from a new vice tax.

That’s not what happened. In the fiscal year 2014-15, for example, taxes from the sale of recreational marijuana in Colorado totaled $77.9 million, $66.1 million of which came from special sales and excise taxes.

For context, the state’s general fund is about $9.7 billion, and the total state budget is $26 billion. By state law, the first $40 million of the excise taxes from marijuana sales went toward capital improvements for poor and rural school districts, and the remainder went toward marijuana education, treatment and regulation and enforcement programs across the state.

The Cherry Creek School District saw none of that money, nor did most of the other large school districts in the Denver metro area.

Similarly, the Building Excellent Schools Today (BEST) grants allotted for the 2016-17 year by the State Board of Education will have no impact on Cherry Creek Schools. Funding for projects in Aurora Public Schools, Adams 14 and Westminster all carry the contingent of matching funds from the school districts, and the vast majority of the 31 awarded grants will go to rural districts far outside of the metro area.

But to be eligible for the grants, those school districts must pass a local bond issue first, or already have matching capital funds available.

So far, the only thing that the legalization of marijuana has brought to our schools has been marijuana.

This isn’t a new story. Taxes on alcohol and tobacco haven’t fixed the state’s quandary when it comes to funding public education, nor have revenues from lotteries or casinos.

The reality is that any fix will have to come from a much more complex and overarching effort. To offer our students the resources they need to learn, we need a much more profound change at the state level, one that comes down to real and lasting change. It comes down to spelling out our collective priorities as Coloradans, to urging our elected representatives to do the hard work and make sure that students in Colorado receive the funding spelled out by a voter-approved constitutional amendment.

That effort is much more complex than any easy fixes offered by legal marijuana.

Harry C. Bull, Jr.
Office of the Superintendent

Cherry Creek School District #5
4700 S. Yosemite Street, Greenwood Village, CO 80111
303-773-1184 | cherrycreekschools.org

Comment I wish Excel had custom data types (Score 1) 302

And not just data formatting.

It would be nice to be able to define a data type and some rules and limits of progression.

I could see the value in defining an arbitrary data type that was comprised of a fixed set ("Apples", "Pears", "Oranges", "Bananas") with no progression (ie, no set member has precedence or rank) or perhaps some with progression or rank (fetus, infant, toddler, child, adolescent, adult, senior). Cells formatted as belonging to a data type would only accept those values as valid entries, and sorting would apply the set's rules of simple progression if there were any.

It might help for other numeric-based data types, such as IP addresses, where it would be helpful to define rules of progression around some kind of delimiter. If they could only add one new data type, I wish it was IP addresses.

There's probably complex ways of doing this with macro/scripting, but, they end up being complex and one of the main reasons so many people use Excel because it makes it trivial to manage lists. Trivial tasks that get made complex end up being done sloppy.

Submission + - ReactOS 0.4.2 Officially Released (with introduced dot.NET 2.0/4.0 support) (reactos.org)

jeditobe writes: Version 0.4.2 of ReactOS, the open-source binary-compatible Windows re-implementation, is now officially available.

What’s more appealing in ReactOS 0.4.2 is it includes the ability to read and write various file systems for Linux/Unix namely ext family and Btrfs and ability to read such file systems as ReiserFS and UFS.

ReactOS 0.4.2 also features Cygwin support, .NET 2.0 (https://jira.reactos.org/browse/CORE-6382) and 4.0 (https://jira.reactos.org/browse/CORE-11266) application support, among other updated packages and revised external dependencies such as Wine and UniATA. The team also worked to improve overall user experience.

ReactOS support has improved to the point that games like Elder Scrolls: Skyrim (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJTL8srScQI) and Doom 3 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rluGgjcXtEY) should even be playable on this "open-source Windows" OS along with applications like Thunderbird and 7-Zip.

ReactOS is free. You can boot your desktop or laptop from it. It looks like Windows (a 10-year-old version, anyway), so you already know how to use it. And it'll run some Windows and DOS applications, maybe including DOS games that regular 64-bit Windows can no longer touch.

Comment Re:The game needs more stuff to do (Score 1) 185

That's exactly what would NOT work here as you're supposed to play in a setting that's recognizably your own town/city/island.

Taking things a biiit too literal here, friend. Who says "your own town/country/planet" doesn't belong to "Dainisekai zone"? Or if it offends you that much, call them "leagues" - Up to CP500, you will only see and battle "shojo" league players.

However they frame it, Niantic has a really, really simple way to segregate players by skill, thereby keeping it fun for noobs and old-timers, fun for casuals and hardcore grinders. Hell, under that model, they could even allow "cheaters" (or even rurals) to play in their own league, rather than outright banning them.

Submission + - Why Past Was Better Than The Present For Half The Americans? (primepost.in)

An anonymous reader writes: Trump thinks present America is far worse a place than it was in the past. So, his slogan for the election, “Make America great again.” He lashes his opponent’s policies as a continuation of the present. Hence his tweet: A vote for Hillary is a vote for another generation of poverty, high crime, and lost opportunities.

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