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Comment Re:What do you mean 'could be'? (Score 1) 167

I'm posting this as another message, as it's a more constructive idea even though I think it's a bit silly:

You've hit upon something. Let's say e-mail is the solution. But folks won't like the lack of the features they've become used to on Facebook: the timeline constructed from other folks status updates, the picture gallery cascade, videos, links, discovering new groups, the real time chat, simple urls.

Then... is the solution to write a wrapper over e-mail that presents a Facebook-like interface?

Folks don't honestly give a shit about how Facebook works. They care about what it looks like and what it does. To them, Facebook is its interface. So if e-mail is better: is there a way to make e-mail more Facebook-like for them? This is just me thinking aloud.

Comment Re:What do you mean 'could be'? (Score 2) 167

What's the alternative?

Let's take three people, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Brown. They want to share pictures of cakes, share lighthearted gossip about Mrs. X's wedding, see pictures of other peoples cakes. Then you come in and make a reasoned case against Facebook, it doesn't matter what that case is: let's assume that you convinced all three, at once, to never touch Facebook again save to inform their contacts that they're leaving. They delete whatever accounts they can, and trust FB (wisely or not) to deactivate the rest and dispose of it however.

Now, Smith, Jones and Brown all turn to you and say 'Alright, no Facebook, no FB app, it's all gone. Where do I go to do all the stuff that I would have done on Facebook? Real time chat, picture hosting, messaging, silly stuff, groups. It's not the 90s so we're not using "Yahoo!" but what do we do now?'

What do you suggest to them?

Comment Re:Experience before starting a game project (Score 1) 419

You've gone mad, my friend. Nobody mentioned 3D, substantial, or "verifiable experience (to qualify for a console devkit)".

They could do it all in text: write some interactive fiction in some adventure editor (or make a lumpy but functional parser in freebasic). They could accompany it with still pictures; they could use still photographs from the place where they went if they felt like.

But even if they wanted something more realtime in 3D and not write an engine, they could use OGRE and all the rest. Or they could make levels in the Build engine or Quake engine in Worldcraft. Or they could just put together some crazy crap with blocks in Minecraft and overlay some text captions over the top.

Comment MS-DOS EDIT (Score 1) 402

Is there a Linux text editor for the console that has an interface similar to MS-DOS Edit?

It really helps in those situations where you're trapped in the shell trying to fix xorg.conf, among other times.

MS-DOS Edit does pretty much all I could want from an editor, runs on thin air, and it has common GUI elements like the status bar, scroll bars and the menu bar which helps me greatly. (I suffer from option amnesia, and a general lack of giving a shit about learning the not-shown shortcuts of other editors.)

Comment Re:Work visa (Score 1) 255

You keep asking it and you keep getting the same answer because you're not supplying any constraints. It's quite disingenuous that you don't seem to be doing any of the research yourself. This kind of thing is not a secret; why would it be? Countries that have an immigration policy more inclusive than 'nobody ever' are going to make their requirements well-known to attract immigration of skilled talent. (Or, if they lack unskilled talent, visas may be available in that category instead.)

That's really the most vague wording of that question you've tried yet, and I answered it fully in another one of your comments, but just for you here's the UK's details.

Let's take a typical case. A skilled worker defined is by the UK in the folowing document:
https://www.gov.uk/tier-2-gene...

The list of occupations with exceptionally desirable skills is given:
https://www.gov.uk/government/...

On page 6, you'll find:

2136 Programmers and software development professionals:
The following jobs in visual effects and 2d/3d computer animation for the film, television or video games sectors:
- software developer
- shader writer
- games designer

The following jobs in the electronics systems industry:
- driver developer
- embedded communications engineer

Eligibility is described in this document:
https://www.gov.uk/tier-2-gene...

- certificate of sponsorship reference number
- an ‘appropriate’ salary
- meet the English requirement
- £900 in savings (£945 from 1 July) - this is to prove you can support yourself and you must have had this in your bank account for 90 days before you apply. You don’t need to have £900 in savings (£945 from 1 July) if your sponsor is fully approved (‘A-rated) and they have stated on your certificate of sponsorship that you won’t claim benefits during your stay.

If you are a graduate with a credible business idea, you would look here instead:
https://www.gov.uk/tier-1-grad...

There are other pages for industry captains, exemplar scientists, artists, sportspeople and so on.

So, for the last time: Find a list of countries that meet your own personal requirements (common language, firstly). Discover their requirements by searching online, or telephone them (information can be found from your local library). If you don't have a library, or a phone, or a workplace, or an internet connection, you are poorly equipped to attempt this. Contact their immigration offices to get a definite list with some solid crunchy numbers and facts for you to use as milestones for your application. Determine what businesses are located in your target country that would be hiring peoples with your (verifiable, i.e. certificated) skill set. You will have to search online, or in electronic or paper trade directories/journals, or speak to acquaintances, friends or colleagues. Contact the necessary businesses for information, and eventually interviews, this may cost money; get a part time job. No, this won't be easy if you're too young to work at an adult level, but if you're too young to work you probably don't have the certifications either (there will possibly be age restrictions for minors too) so it's a non-issue. If and when you are conditionally hired and sponsored (if required) by the company in the target country, organise necessary paperwork, double check all prerequisites (housing, medical registration, for example), and execute the plan.

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