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Comment Re:massive parallel processing=limited application (Score 1) 112

I would first start by making the main memory bus as wide as the L3/L4 cache line, and make *that* one as large as possible. But ultimately, all sharing works only to some extent, so thinking distributed wins big. There's still coherence in program executions. The mere ability to access a unit of data in a shared address space that is currently far away shouldn't mean that you'd be doing this at a high rate.

Comment Re:massive parallel processing=limited application (Score 1) 112

So, no. More cores sharing the same memory is not the answer. More cores with private memory is the answer but we don't have any operating system that can actually take advantage of that. A project that I am eyeing for next year is putting together a system that can effectively spread out the operating system over multiple physical memorys. While I do not think that this is feasible, it's actually not a bad hobby to tinker with :-)

I thought Plan 9 was actually doing this?

Comment Re:Lots of cores doesn't mean shit (Score 1) 112

There's absolutely nothing wrong with designing chips with a larger number of smaller cores, especially if it removes a lot of the core-overengineering pressure present in the legacy x86 chip market and improves power efficiency for smaller applications, which are going to be more numerous in the future. The ability to customize ISAs for specific applications such as modern mobile robotics would also significantly improve the odds when competing against using generic large CPUs.

Comment Re:Laissez Faire Capitalist Here... (Score 1) 203

Direct government control isn't required. The good capitalist solution is not that different to the socialist solution: make homeowners own the last mile (fibre from your house to the cabinet is yours, though you may jointly own some shared trunking with your neighbours). The connections from the cabinets should be owned by public interest companies, with the shares owned by the homeowners. Providing Internet connectivity to the network would be something that you'd open to tender by any companies (for-profit or non-profit) that wanted to provide it.

The situation in most of the USA is that it's been done using the worst possible mixture of laissez-fair capitalism and central planning. Vast amounts of taxpayer money have been poured into the infrastructure, yet that infrastructure is owned by a few companies and they have geographical monopolies and are now owned by their customers, so have no incentive to improve it. Oh, and regulator capture means that it's actually illegal to fix the problem in a lot of places. You can provide an incentive in several ways:

  • Tax penalties or fines for companies that don't improve their infrastructure. Big government hammer, and very difficult to enforce usefully.
  • Try to align the ownership of the companies with their customers. Companies have to do what their shareholders want and if their shareholders want them to upgrade the network because they're getting crap service then they will.
  • Ensure that there's real competition. This is difficult because it's hard to provide any useful differentiation between providers of a big dumb pipe and the cost for new entrants into the market is very high.

Comment Re:BS (Score 1) 166

Android and iOS have very different philosophies. Android devices aim to be general-purpose computer, iOS devices aim to be extensions to a general-purpose computer. I have an Android tablet and an iPad, and I find I get a lot more use from the iPad because it doesn't try to replace my computer. There's a bunch of stuff that I can do on the Android tablet that I can't do on the iPad, but all of it is stuff that I'd be better off doing on my laptop anyway (with the one exception of an IRC client that doesn't disconnect when I switch to a different window). I still use Android for my phone, because OSMAnd~ (offline maps, offline routing, open source, and good map data) is the killer app for a smartphone for me and the iOS port is far less good.

Comment Re: The anti-science sure is odd. (Score 1) 679

Alas, it's a shame that it doesn't mean anything. The point here is that the Earth has undergone many shifts in its climate, sometimes in a startlingly short period of time

Except that the difference in temperature between the peak of the Medieval Warm Period and the bottom of the Little Ice Age were significantly smaller than the difference between the current temperature and the bottom of the Little Ice Age. The last time we saw an increase in temperature equivalent to the last 200 years it was over a period of tens of thousands of years.

Go and read a news story about an area of science that you know about and compare it to what the original research actually claimed. Now realise that press reports about climate change are no more accurate than that and go and read some of the papers. The models have been consistently refined for the last century, but the predictions are refinements (typically about specific local conditions and timescales), not complete reversals. Each year, there are more measurements that provide more evidence to support the core parts of the models.

Oh, and I don't think the words objectivist or dualistic mean what you think they mean. You can't discard evidence simply by throwing random words into a discussion.

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